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jay
08-29-2011, 09:50 AM
Hey all, wanting to get some input on how one can lessen chances of altitude sickness and dehydration while hunting the high country, other than the obvious drinking plenty of water and adjusting to altitude slowly...ideas of what you all have done to try and minimize symptoms while being back 10 miles on foot or horseback from society.

Bitterroot Bulls
08-29-2011, 10:13 AM
Acclimatizing by sleeping at progressively higher altitudes is the best way. Your body produces more red blood cells while sleeping at high altitude. I live at 4000 feet. I spend a night at 8000, followed by 10000, before working hard at 12000 plus.

If you live at a lower altitude, you will need to start lower.

If you start to have symptoms, make sure to get to lower elevations as soon as you can.

MT backcountry hunter
08-29-2011, 03:42 PM
I have been using a product from hammer nutrition called HEED and Perpetuem Solids. I take the HEED to keep me plenty hydrated (its gatorade on crack! without all the sugars) and I use the Perpetuem to replenish lost fats and give you energy. The Perpetuem is great, I keep it in my hip belt pocket and eat 1 every 30 minutes or so. Those 2 products will definitely help. Bitterroot's advice will definitely help as well. Just go slow and if you get a headache or feel nauseous take a break or set up camp.

jay
08-29-2011, 04:00 PM
MT, where can you buy that stuff? Thank you both for the info...

xtreme
08-29-2011, 08:03 PM
My house is at 8700ft and sometimes visitors have altitude sickness. To get to a lower altitude is a long drive. I was thinking a small container of oxygen might help. Any ideas on this? My sister-in-law is quick to get altitude sickness and now she takes something that is preventing it. I will find out what she is taking

thinkin6X6
08-29-2011, 08:12 PM
Take it easy the first day. I definately feel it (little lightheaded and slightly winded) once I get out of the truck after driving from about 1500 feet at my home to the mountains out west.

We usually set up a tent at the trailhead and get a good night sleep before doing anything remotely physical. After a good nights sleep with minimal stress on the body I have had no issues hunting in the 9000-10500 foot range after that. Good Luck.

Bitterroot Bulls
08-29-2011, 09:21 PM
My house is at 8700ft and sometimes visitors have altitude sickness. To get to a lower altitude is a long drive. I was thinking a small container of oxygen might help. Any ideas on this? My sister-in-law is quick to get altitude sickness and now she takes something that is preventing it. I will find out what she is taking

It is probably Diamox.

fatrooster
09-01-2011, 09:59 PM
I cannot comment on altitude sickness but I can on dehydration. Before your hunt quit drinking coffee, soda and tea a week or two before your hunt. You already know that you need to drink water all day long but another thing that helps me is drinking a full bottle of water as soon as I get up in the morning. Drink extra water with your meal and drink another bottle of water before you go to bed even though it might make you get up in the middle of the night to relieve yourself. Don't over do it with gatorade and electrolytes because too much can be harmful. But electrolytes are needed and water alone can not be enough to sustain you at times. You must balance out your water and electrolyte intake. Listen to your body, it is always talking to you. If you feel rundown and are getting a headache then its past time to hydrate. Eat snacks all day as well as drinking all day. I'm the kind of person that gets leg cramps easily but I've found that lots of water intake with the proper foods will prevent this problem. Hope this was helpful. fatrooster.

Wyoflightmedic
09-04-2011, 11:32 AM
Here is a link that will help. http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2012/chapter-2-the-pre-travel-consultation/altitude-illness.htm

kineticnrg
09-24-2011, 04:38 PM
Try Altitude Advantage from www.wildernessathlete.com

A3dhunter
11-29-2011, 01:04 PM
It is probably Diamox.

I have used diamox after suffering from altitude sickness for two years, it has worked great but one side effect is carbonated drinks taste awful!

Treekiller

Drhorsepower
11-29-2011, 03:29 PM
I have used diamox after suffering from altitude sickness for two years, it has worked great but one side effect is carbonated drinks taste awful!

Treekiller

Lol. Shouldn't e drinking those while hunting anyways!

fatkid
11-29-2011, 06:13 PM
It kinda makes sense not to eat salty foods but are there any foods you would try to eat while hunting in the high country and having to carry all your food?

pcc2b
12-02-2011, 07:00 AM
Diamox or (Acetazolamide) is wonderful. I live in TN and hunt in CO at 13k ft every year. no time to aclimatize. Just take Diamox about 2 days before you are going on your trip. I usually stop taking it after 2-3 days. It does have a few side effects like mentioned before, but to ensure that my trip isn't ruined by altitude sickness is totally worth it. It is available as a generic prescription from your Dr.

CoBackcountry
12-05-2011, 08:35 PM
i have never had a problem i live at 7000ft and camp at 10,300 and hunt around 11,400
but my dad is coming out from wisconsin so im gonna get him some altitude advantage from wilderness athlete to try
never used it but i am happy with there hydrate and recover and energy and focus drink mixes

A3dhunter
12-05-2011, 08:39 PM
Lol. Shouldn't e drinking those while hunting anyways!

LOL
You're right, but it is a sore reminder when traveling and you don't think about it grabbing some fast food, then throw away the whole coke.

MSUcat61
12-07-2011, 01:51 AM
I've also heard Viagra can help reduce symptoms because it is a vasodialator and will reduce systemic blood pressure since the increased pressure in your capillaries is what causes the the edema... but try explaining yourself to your hunting buddies when that bottle rolls out of your pack on a week long backcountry trip. Ha ha.

Drhorsepower
12-07-2011, 09:41 AM
I've also heard Viagra can help reduce symptoms because it is a vasodialator and will reduce systemic blood pressure since the increased pressure in your capillaries is what causes the the edema... but try explaining yourself to your hunting buddies when that bottle rolls out of your pack on a week long backcountry trip. Ha ha.

Yes Viagra will work. Do I want to take a pde5 inhibitor? Not really! Like most stated, diamox is the best. Also one can use meclizine which is Dramamine but less drowsy. The side effects might be outweigh benefits though. You will be really really thirsty. The problem with all of these meds is they get rid of water which is why they work. Now you are dehydrated which is no bueno. You can treat hace or hape with a drug called decadron which is dexamethasone. It doesn't prevent it but can treat signs and symptoms after the fact. I think the best thing you can do is get acclimated and sleep low while hunting high. Also breathing techniques like taking 10 or so large deep breaths rapidly every 5-10 min or so which will force water out of lungs. Also doing this while creating back pressure with your mouth

buckykm1
12-08-2011, 05:43 PM
The biggest thing i do, being a flat lander, is i start taking one aspirin a day, 3 to 4 weeks before i go out west, i have been doing it for about 10 years now, totally eliminates the headaches, and i drink plenty of fluids, i like Gatorade. and i take it easy the first day or two.

Kevin

pcc2b
12-08-2011, 06:33 PM
I've also heard Viagra can help reduce symptoms because it is a vasodialator and will reduce systemic blood pressure since the increased pressure in your capillaries is what causes the the edema... but try explaining yourself to your hunting buddies when that bottle rolls out of your pack on a week long backcountry trip. Ha ha.

Forget having to explain when the bottle rolls out. I would be worried about explaining the unintended side effect the drug is really prescribed for! Boy you must REALLY love the mountains!

Kickingmonkey
01-10-2012, 02:16 PM
I found this stuff called Acli-Mate, and used it before I went backpacking. This stuff works great! I live at around 1,800 ft, and in three days we had driven and were camping at 11,500 ft. Here is the site:

http://www.acli-mate.com/