PDA

View Full Version : Snowshoes



Elkoholic307
09-16-2011, 09:15 AM
Any snowshoe gurus on here? The wife and I have been thinking it would be a fun thing to do this winter, but I don't know anything about them. Can anybody point me in the right direction?

sjsmallfield
09-16-2011, 10:43 AM
Check out MSR and Red Feather. They have some good quality kits that come with the shoes, poles and a carry bag. I am no expert but we sold the Red Feather kits last year in the shop I work at. Every one we have talked to has been very happy with them. This year we are going to carry some kits by MSR and have heard nothing but good about them as well. I hope this helps. I you have any more questions PM me and I will try my best to answer them. Good luck!

Reflex
09-16-2011, 07:07 PM
My wife and I used some MSR snowshoes. They worked great and it was a lot of fun.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u165/martyhamel/100_0924.jpg

6mm Remington
09-17-2011, 06:14 PM
I have had a pair of Tubb's snowshoes for a long time and have been happy with them, but last year I got a set of the MSR Lightning Ascent shoes and I love them. They are solid and well built and have great traction and flotation. The bindings are also simple and secure and foolproof. I was looking at either Tubbs or MSR, and it finally came down to MSR as they are made in the USA. Tubb's is a great company and make a nice shoe, but the final determination was where they are being built! Even at that I think I got the best shoe I could.
I'm 603 and weigh about 220. The Ascents as stated already have a kit you can get for them and they have a tail that can be added if the snow conditions are such that you need more flotation. They slip on quickly and easily and you can carry them in a small daypack. I use the Ascents for elk hunting, coyote hunting, and just being out there. They are great! They are a little spendy, but if you purchase really good shoes with really good bindings you won't regret it and you won't be going back later to upgrade. I think you could find a Tubbs or Redfeather shoe that would also work very well. I believe that Red Feather is made in USA as well. Good luck and I hope this helps.
David

http://i857.photobucket.com/albums/ab134/davidwalrod/028.jpg

http://i857.photobucket.com/albums/ab134/davidwalrod/020-2.jpg

Elkoholic307
09-18-2011, 09:58 AM
Thanks guys, I really appreciate the info!

Bitterroot Bulls
09-18-2011, 10:02 AM
I have a set of Tubbs that I really like. Be sure to get a pair rated for the weight of you, your hunting gear, and a load of meat!

MT backcountry hunter
09-18-2011, 10:45 AM
Can't agree more with Bitterroot. Say you weight 150 lbs but plan on carrying a pack for hunting, make sure you up the size to ones rated for 200 lbs. That will ensure you get great float out of them even in powder.

elktracker
09-18-2011, 07:05 PM
I have used Tubbs, Atlas and MSR shoes, I prefer Atlas myself. I think the MSRs are nice but a little over priced, especially after you buy the tails which you will need in powder. My Atlas shoes also have a bar under your heel that you can flip up for going up really steep hills that makes it a little easier on your calf muscles. I also think Atlas has the best suspension and binding system. I don't use poles but I have before and they are pretty nice. As has been said the most important thing is getting a set that is rated for your body weight plus the gear you will be carrying. One other thing to consider is how you are going to use them, if you plan on carrying them in a pack until you hit deep snow I would go with MSR because they are the most compact and lightweight.

6mm Remington
09-19-2011, 01:44 PM
Elktracker I agree with the fip-up bar. The MSR has that also and it sure works! I actually purchased the Atlas poles at first, but took them back after one use of about a 2 mile trek. The darn basket is removeable which can be nice so you can take it off and use them for hunting or hiking also. Only problem was the basket kept coming off of one or the other. Good idea, bad design. There was not enough of a lip to keep them on the pole. I would plant one and sometimes it would go deep into the snow and I would lift the pole up and the basket would stay buried in about 4' of snow. That would mean me getting on my belly in the snow and reaching and digging until I would come up with the basket and could put it on again. About 100 yards up the hill and it would do it all over again. I took them back and spent $10.00 more for the MSR pole that also have the removeable basket. It flat out stays on yet is removeable. Problem solved. I do really like using poles with mine. It helps the whole body do the work and not just your legs.
David

Elkoholic307
09-21-2011, 09:40 PM
You guys make some great points; ones that I had never thought of. Thanks a bunch!

WYrider
12-22-2011, 07:53 PM
Not trying to jack this thread or anything, but elkohlic got me thinking. Are using snowshoes during hunting practical? The snow was really bad this year (the kind of snow that you think you might stay on top of but end up falling through 95% of the time). I got home and thought snowshoes would have been nice. Never done it before so I wouldn't have a clue if it would be good for hunting or not. Just sounded good. Can you walk in them without the poles? Thoughts?

Bitterroot Bulls
12-22-2011, 08:28 PM
Not trying to jack this thread or anything, but elkohlic got me thinking. Are using snowshoes during hunting practical? The snow was really bad this year (the kind of snow that you think you might stay on top of but end up falling through 95% of the time). I got home and thought snowshoes would have been nice. Never done it before so I wouldn't have a clue if it would be good for hunting or not. Just sounded good. Can you walk in them without the poles? Thoughts?

Poles are a must. They are absolutely practical. It is amazing where you can get on them. I did about 14 miles (tracked it out on Google Earth) in one day this year on mine. I have also packed out bulls in ridiculous conditions with them. I use them all the time.

Kevin Root
12-22-2011, 08:56 PM
Elkoholic307, just thought I'd add that there is a good write up on the REI site below on snowshoes. A good option might be to rent so you can see if it is something you might want to get into or not and perhaps try some out that the folks here recommended. I have a pair of modified bear paw Sherpas with crampon grips that I use winter backpacking here in the Sierras. There are a lot of cool different brands out there depending out what you want to use them for.

http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/articles/snowshoeing+first+steps.html

WYrider, I've used snowshoes without poles and on level ground it's ok to cruise on. For me like Bitterroot Bulls notes I think they are a must as well. If I have a pack and I'm going up any kind of uphill grade the poles sure help a lot in balance and foot placement on the hills. Falling over and getting back up while on snowshoes with a pack on is not the most graceful of things.