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Ikeepitcold
11-14-2011, 03:40 PM
A friend of mine told me of a hunt he was on in Alaska were he was cutting a rope off of his pack and stuck the knife into his chest! The guide had a sewing kit and was able to stitch up the wound until they could get back to civilization. Lucky for him he didn't puncture a lung or anything real serious.
I have Been fortunate enough not to have had anything happen to me while hunting, I havent broke anything or cut myself. Maybe my friend wouldn't have hurt himself if he was using the knife properly.
Have any of you had a life threatening experience while hunting?

sjsmallfield
11-14-2011, 04:22 PM
Great Thread IKIC.
About ten years ago my dad and I where hunting about an hour and a half from home. We had dropped down into a canyon and walked up the other side. We were about 2-1/2 miles from the truck when we decided to head back. I headed down throug the timber while my dad walked straight down through a big clear cut to my left. We hadn't gone 100yds when I could hear him yelling for me. When I made it to him I found out he had completly blown his knee out. It took me several hours to get him and all of our gear out. He had to lean on me the whole way. Not a major incident in the end but it could have been pretty serious if he had been out there alone. (Always let someone know where you are going and when you should be back!!!)

ffd061
11-14-2011, 05:52 PM
A couple of incidents come to mind for me.
While hunting deer this year in Wy, we saw a group of mule deer crest a ridgeline and go down into another canyon. We proceeded up the "hill" to get a better look at the herd. About halfway up, it felt like some took a knife and sliced my calf muscle. Down I went, rolling around on the ground, thinking it may have been a charlie horse. After some recovery period, I hobled back to the trail, which luckily wasnt too far. Went back to camp and took it easy the rest of the day. Went out that hunting that evening and was still not able to walk. Managed to hike about a 1/4 mile, and it took about an hour-literally baby steps. We ended up cutting the hunt short and to this day have not fully recovered. Certainly not a life threatening injury, but was enough to cost me a great hunt.
The other incident, I was hunting whitetails from a treestand in South Dakota. We were going to reset the stand in a different location, and stupid me, I didnt have my safety belt attached and down I went, striking the tree and catching several metal tree steps on the way down. Went unconscious after hitting the ground, my bro in law ran over to check on me. As I slowly woke up, felt my abdominal area and noticed lots of blood. Thinking I had eviserated myself, my bro in law opened my clothes, luckily just a deep laceration, scraped and black and blue face, I came out ok. To this day, always wear a safety harness.

jenbickel
11-14-2011, 08:53 PM
This is a great thread! I have never had a life threatening injury while I was out hunting but I am a HUGE klutz so I am just waiting for the day.. I go out shed hunting and hunting a lot alone and so I am seriously considering getting a "SPOT." Anyone use one?

Ikeepitcold
11-14-2011, 09:27 PM
This is a great thread! I have never had a life threatening injury while I was out hunting but I am a HUGE klutz so I am just waiting for the day.. I go out shed hunting and hunting a lot alone and so I am seriously considering getting a "SPOT." Anyone use one?

I don't have one but have considered it. I also do alot on my own, scouting, hiking,hunting and so on. I know I've been in some places that if I was to get hurt I know I would be in deep shizz. I always tell my wife were I am and usually one of my hunting buddy's. I started to send my location to my wife with my iPhone through GPS just in case. It does seem that cell service is getting better in the hills, but my luck I will be in the bottom of a canyon with no way of contact. I always try to bring someone along so I'm not solo but I seem to be out with just me and my dog.

Leveller
11-14-2011, 09:41 PM
Not life threatening but could have been if circumstances had been different. Was hunting a tough canyon in Eastern Oregon last year - big windfalls, wet algae covered rocks, maple vine - I slipped, twisted and fell and blew out my knee. My leg was the size of my upper thigh all way down to my ankle. Had to have major knee surgery and intensive PT, but got it all back together and was back out in the same unit this season and downed a nice 4-point muley. Didn't think I could pull it off, but sheer determination, blood, sweat and tears got me through, and we hiked up in to the wilderness this year!

Drhorsepower
11-15-2011, 12:14 AM
While duck hunting a few years back, we drag our layout bouts through knee deep mud 1/4-1/2 mile out in these floods, well we made the half hour drag and the three of us set up our decoys and it wasnt 15 minutes when one of my pals said, hey I'm going to head back to the truck, I think I'm having a heart attack! We stopped him, threw him in his layout boat and drug his heavy butt back to the truck. Of course we didn't have our cell phone so the tall legged one out of his high tailed it to the truck to call 911 then came back out to help us drag him out. Talk about being sore for a week. Didn't compare to what he went through. He ended up have a 3rd degree heart block. And they gave him an expensive helicopter ride back to Reno. That's the one and only medical emergency I have had while hunting. When we went back out later that day to get our boats, the two of us ended up killing 12 ducks with one shotgun. (mine was in the my buddies boat back at truck) oops. Always have your phone and stay in shape.

sethkuhl
11-15-2011, 03:48 PM
Not my experience but my wifes grandfather.
My wife and I were out hunting last fall, we got a call that her grandfather (65) had been hospitalized, lined it up and headed down for the ten hour drive. Arrived there and found out that he was bow hunting and had come across a tree stand and decided to get in it. It broke out, and he broke his back in the fall not being able to move. After a while his brother came along and found him, leaving for help, left him with a .40 s and W to protect himself from the bears. Life flight and lots of recovery, he was back out bow hunting this year! tough bird!

ssliger
11-15-2011, 06:18 PM
Not life threatening, but was out deer hunting probably 7 years ago. I was walking around camp at night and stepped in a hole and wrenched my ankle real bad, so the first thing i did was change into a taller pair of boots and put them on snug to keep the swelling down. Then i proceeded to sleep with the boot on and went out hunting for the rest of the weekend. Every step hurt like heck, but who really wants to go to the Dr if they can still attempt to hunt. It was not till i got back i went to the Dr and found out that i had actually broke my ankle.

Drhorsepower
11-15-2011, 07:40 PM
Not life threatening, but was out deer hunting probably 7 years ago. I was walking around camp at night and stepped in a hole and wrenched my ankle real bad, so the first thing i did was change into a taller pair of boots and put them on snug to keep the swelling down. Then i proceeded to sleep with the boot on and went out hunting for the rest of the weekend. Every step hurt like heck, but who really wants to go to the Dr if they can still attempt to hunt. It was not till i got back i went to the Dr and found out that i had actually broke my ankle.

Did you kill a buck?

A3dhunter
11-15-2011, 08:26 PM
While hiking along a steep slope in ColoradoI was crossing a slide when I lost my footing, next thing I know I was sliding downhill and the going was getting rough. I managed to get on my back and had my feet out in front of me, I saw one tree to my left that might stop me before a sheer drop. I was able to get slowed down a little and lean over and plant my foot down. I pushed some dirt/rock up right before the tree and then hit the tree hard!
It held and I was able to get stopped and move to the left and away from the slide. I had slid about 40 feet.
I ended up jamming one finger, my hands were shredded and a couple fingernails were ripped loose, but other than that I walked away. Another 10 feet and it would have been a 30 foot drop to the bottom of a creek bed.
That jammed finger hurt for two years after that.

ssliger
11-15-2011, 08:46 PM
Did you kill a buck?

No a friend mine shot a decent 3 point, it was his first ever.

Ikeepitcold
11-15-2011, 10:07 PM
While hiking along a steep slope in ColoradoI was crossing a slide when I lost my footing, next thing I know I was sliding downhill and the going was getting rough. I managed to get on my back and had my feet out in front of me, I saw one tree to my left that might stop me before a sheer drop. I was able to get slowed down a little and lean over and plant my foot down. I pushed some dirt/rock up right before the tree and then hit the tree hard!
It held and I was able to get stopped and move to the left and away from the slide. I had slid about 40 feet.
I ended up jamming one finger, my hands were shredded and a couple fingernails were ripped loose, but other than that I walked away. Another 10 feet and it would have been a 30 foot drop to the bottom of a creek bed.
That jammed finger hurt for two years after that.

Holy crap! How freaking scary that had to be!

RUTTIN
11-16-2011, 08:11 PM
A friend, my father, and I were setting up tree stands the week before the hunt, when my dad said he didn't feel good. I knew what was happening, he was having a heart attack. I raced up the steep hill about a mile and half to the four wheeler and bushwhacked it down to him to get him out so he didn't have to over exert climbing out. Got him to his four wheeler and headed out for help.(no cell service) I had him go first, when I came around the first corner he was on the ground off his wheeler. I went for help, while my friend stayed with him. When I left I knew I would probably never see my dad alive again. An hour later I got cell service, called 911 and met medical help to show them where to get to him(13 miles back on a dirt road). Life flight was called and landed as we got back to him with the GPS cordinates for them. My dad never made it out of the mountains that night. Never in my life did I think I would help put my dad in a body bag. Hunting has never been the same for me, to loose my mentor who taught me everything I know about hunting. I know he is with me on every hunt though. Worst day of my life.

Jerry
11-16-2011, 09:54 PM
A friend, my father, and I were setting up tree stands the week before the hunt, when my dad said he didn't feel good. I knew what was happening, he was having a heart attack. I raced up the steep hill about a mile and half to the four wheeler and bushwhacked it down to him to get him out so he didn't have to over exert climbing out. Got him to his four wheeler and headed out for help.(no cell service) I had him go first, when I came around the first corner he was on the ground off his wheeler. I went for help, while my friend stayed with him. When I left I knew I would probably never see my dad alive again. An hour later I got cell service, called 911 and met medical help to show them where to get to him(13 miles back on a dirt road). Life flight was called and landed as we got back to him with the GPS cordinates for them. My dad never made it out of the mountains that night. Never in my life did I think I would help put my dad in a body bag. Hunting has never been the same for me, to loose my mentor who taught me everything I know about hunting. I know he is with me on every hunt though. Worst day of my life.
Man that sucks, but I'm sure he is watching you on every stalk and celebrates every kill with you!

Ikeepitcold
11-16-2011, 10:35 PM
A friend, my father, and I were setting up tree stands the week before the hunt, when my dad said he didn't feel good. I knew what was happening, he was having a heart attack. I raced up the steep hill about a mile and half to the four wheeler and bushwhacked it down to him to get him out so he didn't have to over exert climbing out. Got him to his four wheeler and headed out for help.(no cell service) I had him go first, when I came around the first corner he was on the ground off his wheeler. I went for help, while my friend stayed with him. When I left I knew I would probably never see my dad alive again. An hour later I got cell service, called 911 and met medical help to show them where to get to him(13 miles back on a dirt road). Life flight was called and landed as we got back to him with the GPS cordinates for them. My dad never made it out of the mountains that night. Never in my life did I think I would help put my dad in a body bag. Hunting has never been the same for me, to loose my mentor who taught me everything I know about hunting. I know he is with me on every hunt though. Worst day of my life.


I'm very sorry to hear that. I agree he is watching over you and I'm sure he is happy that you continue to hunt.

Bitterroot Bulls
11-17-2011, 09:06 AM
Ohh, I got plenty of these stories ... unfortunately.

First off, I have a SPOT and never head to the woods without it. If you don't have one, get one. Keep it in your pocket and not in your pack.



A few years ago I was hunting the high alpine country of Western Montana for mule deer and was looking for a giant 190 class typical buck. I had seen a number of deer that were good shooters, but that was the deer I was after. My buddy had killed a deer the day before in this area and told me he had seen a buck that neither of us had seen through weeks of archery hunting. He said it was a double dropper nontypical. I was excited to hit the trail, but had a harder time than usual, coughing up large amounts of phlem.

I scrambled up the snowy, steep backside of a mountain, so I could glass down into an area with patches of pine and steep slides. I had a lot of trouble with my cough and felt unusually light-headed, but I continued on. I got up there and glassed down. Right away in noticed a deer body tucked up under the low branches of a fir in the middle of a slide. I glassed him until I could see his right antler move, and a drop tine came into view!

That was enough for me, so I lined up on him and put one through the goods. He just layed his head over in the snow. I racked the bolt, put it on safe, and stuck it down the Eberlestock gunscabbard, in case he tried to jump up on approach. I scrambled over to him and nearly slipped down the snowy slide several times getting to him. I found him there and got a look at his 21 points. He had a tight 24 inch mainframe and short forks, so I knew he wouldn't score great, but he was heavy and ... well ... awesome.

I boned him and caped him, and suffed him into the pack. I got everything loaded, and just put the shoulder straps on loose, given the extreme terrain. I just started off the ledge, and lost my footing. I started rolling, and somehow got out of my shoulder straps. My pack and I started on separate paths down the mountain. I rolled off a 15 foot ribbon cliff and landed hard on my back. My wind was gone. I looked down to the see my pack, antlers, rifle, and all disappear over another cliff. Then I heard a giant kaboom. It took me a minute to process what happened ... but it dawned on me, and I realized I had never unloaded the gun.

It seemed like forever before I could breathe again. I said a prayer, thanking the Lord I was still alive. I could not believe how stupid I had been not clearing my rifle. I checked myself over, and found that nothing was broken. My back and both arms were starting to visibly swell, though, and I knew I had to get moving. I slid/side-stepped my way down the slide and found my rifle by itself about 20 feet from the path the pack had taken. The rifle and scope looked like new! The safety was now in the off position. I scrambled down to the next cliff and could see my pack, without head and antlers, about 250 feet down the slide. I could see the head above it and game bags of meat along the slide mark. I made my way, slowly and painfully down the slide and picked up the meat on the way, rolling it down to the pack. I made it to the head, and found the right main beam and a couple inches of the left dropper had broken, but the reast was OK. I made it to my pack and found that the rifle had gone off when it was half out of the scabbard (exposing the trigger and safety to rocks and sticks), and blasted the scabbard apart. The compression straps were all still attached to the frame. I put everything in strapped it all back together. To my surprise the pack carried the load!

I hiked back to the lake in what can only be described as a miserable, painfull march. My friend was at the lake, because he had come in to get his bivy camp out from the day before. He found me in miserable form. I told him the story and he thankfully took the bulk of the meat in his pack, with his camp, for the rest of the 3 miles out. I was coughing uncontrollably. I was miserably sore. I was having a hard time putting one foot in front of the other, but finally made it out.

My wife bought me a SPOT immediately afterward. It turned out I had pneumonia from a lung infection. This story is hard to tell, and more than a little embarrassing. However, I hope it gives some of you guys stuff to think about when you are out in the rough and dangerous wilds of the West.

Unfortunately I have more incidents than this one to tell, but maybe another time.

jay
11-17-2011, 10:53 AM
unfortunate, but great story BB. Sorry to hear about your father ruttin...

Bitterroot Bulls
11-17-2011, 02:01 PM
My condolences, Ruttin.

That post is tough to read, let alone live through.

God bless.

sjsmallfield
11-17-2011, 06:04 PM
Ruttin- No words can describe.
BB-No matter what, that was a great lesson for all of us.

Leveller
11-17-2011, 08:07 PM
Ruttin - so sorry for the loss of your father and such a traumatic experience.

BB - I get how the SPOT dials 911, but with the Help feature, how does it notify your close contacts and what unit do they need to have for that to work?

Bitterroot Bulls
11-17-2011, 11:57 PM
Leveller,

The SPOT is simple to use. You log into an online account. You then type what messages you want sent with your OK, Message, and Help buttons. The message can be anything you want for those three buttons. Sometimes I program "I have a bull down here, come and help me get him out" into my Message button, and have it sent to my buddy. You cannot type your own message for the 911 button.

When you push the OK, Message, or Help button it sends your corresponding preprogrammed message to any ten emails and ten phone numbers (text only) you put into your online profile. The emails contain your message, your Lat/Long and a link to your location on Google Maps. Text has only your message and Lat/Long. The 911 button has the SPOT dispatcher contact local search and rescue.

Hope that helps.

Kevin Root
11-18-2011, 01:15 PM
Ruttin, I'm so sorry to hear about your loss.
Bitterroot Bulls, and everyone else thanks for sharing your stories and thoughts.
It's pretty tough and unforgiving out there in the wild outdoors. One never really knows what challenges might come our way. Some things we don't have much if any control over and some we do but hopefully we can all be successful in overcoming the ones we are able to overcome. I hope all your hunts are all safe and successful. God bless you all.

SR1
11-23-2011, 07:26 PM
Elk hunting in eastern Washington. While climbing down some very steep rocky hillsides my knee gave out. Lost 30% of the cartilage. I was an hour from my truck. I fashioned a crutch out of a nearby limb. I took the safer way back to the the truck. it took me 3 and 1/2 hours to get to the truck. I now carry a personal locator beacon. I think the $400.00 is worth your life and the peace of mind. I don't care what brand you choose, but I like the ACR electronics aqualink it's water-proof you have the option of signing up for cell phone / email friend notification or just using the search and rescue by its self. Just leave the macho crap in the truck and be safe and smart out there.

floorya
11-23-2011, 11:00 PM
first of all.i'm very sorry to hear about your loss.
a couple years ago i was following a handfull of grouse down through an old burn with a bunch of blow downs. i stepped on some loose bark and went down. i fell off one log and landed on another log that was on a real steep angle like a slide. i ended up slipping, slideing,and tumbling for what seemed like an hour. when i finaly came to a stop i did a inventory of all my fingers, toes,legs, and arms ect. and then i noticed i had no shotgun???? it took HOURS to find it. it was about 20 feet from where i first slipped.it had lawn darted down through the dead fall. i picked it up and gave it the same once over i gave myself and made my way back to my truck. very happy i wasn't busted up any worse then i was. and VERY happy i hadn't shot myself. so please be cafeful out there.

8750
11-27-2011, 11:46 PM
i used the Spot Connect with an iphone this fall. It is kind of a piece *****. I dont really trust it so much. The Spot Connect app for the phone crashes often. Not very confidence inspiring. But I guess in the end, it's better than nothing!

T43
11-28-2011, 03:33 AM
I was afraid of the Spot Connect for just that reason so I went with the Spot 2. Not only do I take it every time I go out but I make my wife take it with the tracking set up when she travels without me. Good piece of mind when she, my 3 year old and my due in March kids travel through all the large cell dead zones between our place and her parents. She used it this afternoon on the trip back and I knew by checking the map how long I had to get all my hunting stuff out of the living room.

Bitterroot Bulls
11-28-2011, 09:30 AM
I also have the SPOT2, T43. It is pretty accurate, and reliable.

Kevin Root
11-28-2011, 12:35 PM
Thanks for the update on the SPOT2 Bitterroot Bulls and T43. I had been reading some bad press or feedback on the hit and miss service as well on the SPOT in it getting the messages out and the tracking features working smoothly. It would be a cool feature if the SPOT had better communication features or options. I wish it would allow a confirmation message back from who you are sending it to and or some better communication similar to a satellite phone.

Ikeepitcold
12-01-2011, 08:15 PM
Thanks for the update on the SPOT2 Bitterroot Bulls and T43. I had been reading some bad press or feedback on the hit and miss service as well on the SPOT in it getting the messages out and the tracking features working smoothly. It would be a cool feature if the SPOT had better communication features or options. I wish it would allow a confirmation message back from who you are sending it to and or some better communication similar to a satellite phone.

The Spot uses the same satellites that I used to use for my SAT phone. They were having lots of issues with good connections and especially connections for longer then a few minutes. I would be talking on my SAT phone then I would loose the signal. Then I would have to wait for the next satellite to fly over before I could get a new connection. I think it is probably the same issue. I was told that it was supposed to be fix last year by my provider. I haven't had to use my SAT phone since last year so I don't know if they got the issues repaired or not.
My Provider was Globalstar

buckykm1
12-08-2011, 10:33 AM
This is a great thread! I have never had a life threatening injury while I was out hunting but I am a HUGE klutz so I am just waiting for the day.. I go out shed hunting and hunting a lot alone and so I am seriously considering getting a "SPOT." Anyone use one?


I am going to get a PLB, and i have done a lot of research on them, i would never buy a Spot, one thing is the yearly activation fee of about $120.00, and 90% of the reviews on them are Bad, from the research i have done, the ACR ResQlink is one of the best, there is NO activation Fee, and they work in heavy cover, the Spot doesn't. from what i have seen, the average price for one is about $275.00.

Kevin

Vanish
12-08-2011, 01:22 PM
Some of these storied made me pretty queasy! You think you're a tough guy until you really consider.

mtelknhtr78
12-18-2011, 11:20 PM
I agree with Buckykm1, a 406 beacon is the way to go. The upfront costs of a PLB seem like more but after a few years of SPOT subscriptions the PLB costs less. Not to mention the PLB 406 beacon has far better coverage worldwide and in a variety of situations. They work betterin terrain and thick cover. Plus most national SAR assets(ie Coast guard, Airforce, etc) are more than familiar with the PLB and how to use the information.
Most if not all military pilots fly with a 406 beacon of some sort. i know in the navy our emergency radio in our flight vest has a 406 beacon in it.