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View Full Version : 300 Win Mag for Long Range?



ssliger
03-10-2012, 10:47 AM
Is the 300 Win mag good for a long range shooter? This will probably be for target shooting only, just want some thoughts. Thanks.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-10-2012, 11:02 AM
. Yes.

:)

hvfd21walker
03-10-2012, 12:23 PM
Heck Ya. Its a great caliber.

Shaun
03-10-2012, 03:51 PM
Yes that's what I use

Drhorsepower
03-10-2012, 04:42 PM
Seems like 7mm and 300 wm are the calipers of choice for long range.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-10-2012, 04:46 PM
Seems like 7mm and 300 wm are the calipers of choice for long range.

And 6.5....

Jerry
03-10-2012, 05:03 PM
Love my 300!

Whisky
03-10-2012, 07:02 PM
Heck yeah it's fine for targets. Even better for a LR hunting rig. If for only target shooting, you don't need the recoil of the 300 for good performance. If I was to build a target only rifle right now, I'd go with a 6 or 6.5mm of some sort. Targets only, in a heavy rig, 6mm SLR. Targets and hunting up to deer sized game, 260 Rem.

Go to JBM and run some calculations on the 6 and 6.5s, you might be surprised. They are tough to beat. Low recoil, lots of reloading components, great performance, short action, lots of reloading data available, lots of match components available, and I'll say it a second time, low recoil.

Whisky
03-10-2012, 07:04 PM
And 6.5....

This ^^^^

6.5's are taking over the LR target/tactical comps.

Jerry
03-10-2012, 08:05 PM
As an addition to my previous post on this subject, my Browning A Bolt 300 Win Mag has the BOSS system (Ballistics Optimizing Shooting System) Installed. Without it the recoil is very heavy but with the BOSS it doesn't have as much felt recoil than my 30 06. My youngest daughter would rather shoot the 300 than the 06.

Colorado Cowboy
03-11-2012, 07:43 PM
What do you consider long range? Some might think 300 yds is and others 1,000 yards. No matter what you think though, most of the .300 mags are great calibers. I shoot a .300 Wby.

ssliger
03-11-2012, 07:59 PM
Thanks for all the advice. The next question is what is a good scope to put on it?

Bitterroot Bulls
03-11-2012, 08:01 PM
I am waiting on a Vortex Viper HS LR 4-16X50 for my 300 RUM.

The ones I have seen are pretty nice, but I want to put one through the paces.

hvfd21walker
03-11-2012, 08:29 PM
I have a leupold mark 4 on my 30-338. Its a great scope.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-11-2012, 08:41 PM
I used to have a mark 4 on the 300 RUM that is waiting on the Viper. It was pretty nice, but you can get a lot of scope for Mark 4 money.

hvfd21walker
03-11-2012, 08:44 PM
BB does that Vortex have a turret system for it or do you use clicks for drops?

Bitterroot Bulls
03-11-2012, 08:51 PM
BB does that Vortex have a turret system for it or do you use clicks for drops?

Well, you click the turret to adjust elevation for your drops, so yes and yes. The elevation turret is exposed. The windage turret is covered. The reticle has both BDC (calibrated in MOA) stadia and windage hashes.

hvfd21walker
03-11-2012, 09:03 PM
BB let me know what you think of it. I have a 300 win mag that I was thinking about putting one of the Vortex Vipers on.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-11-2012, 09:11 PM
BB let me know what you think of it. I have a 300 win mag that I was thinking about putting one of the Vortex Vipers on.

I tell ya what, when I get it setup, we can just run up to Whittecar, and you can check it out yourself. Then we can put it right next to your mark 4, and my Swarovski z3, and let the EF know how it goes. I'll even take some pics. Maybe that would give ssliger some good info for his scope selection.

hvfd21walker
03-11-2012, 09:28 PM
I tell ya what, when I get it setup, we can just run up to Whittecar, and you can check it out yourself. Then we can put it right next to your mark 4, and my Swarovski z3, and let the EF know how it goes. I'll even take some pics. Maybe that would give ssliger some good info for his scope selection.
That would be awesome and then I can tell you why I actually shoot Leuopld. When do you think you will be getting it?

Bitterroot Bulls
03-11-2012, 09:38 PM
Vortex is having a hard time filling orders for the Viper HS LRs. Demand is high. I am hoping it should be in sometime in the next two weeks.

ssliger, I will keep you posted.

Good scopes for a long-range setup are:

Top-o-the-line: Premier Tactical, Zeiss Hendsoldt, Schmidt and Bender, Steiner, March

Next tier: SWFA SS HD (best value), Nightforce, Leupy Mark 4, Vortex Viper PST/HS LR, Weaver Tactical

Budget: Fixed power SWFA SS

The above are scopes made for dialing.

Reticle based scopes for long range include:

Swarovski z3,z5,z6 with BRH or ballistic reticle.
Zeiss Diavari or Conquest w/ Rapid Z reticle.
Pride Fowler Rapid Reticle scopes.

Doe Nob
03-12-2012, 01:08 PM
I put a zeiss Rapid Z 800 on top of my savage model 111 long range hunter in 300 win mag. kicks less than a 270 with the muzzle brake, but you will want to wear hearing protection.

ssliger
03-12-2012, 03:40 PM
Are the tactical dials idiot proof? What do I need to know if I was to go that route? I have not got into reloading, I've inherited some reloading supplies and am going to try it out someday. Do i need a chronograph for the dial turrets to know my exact velocity? Thanks for the suggestions.

Colorado Cowboy
03-12-2012, 04:53 PM
Nothings Idiot proof! The ones I know about are from Leupold and are custom made for my loads and yes you need to chronograph the load. If you go to Leupolds webpage they give you all the parameters you need to supply to them.

After I got mine I went out a started shooting it a longer ranges (400 to 500 yds) after I had it sighted in. I did find that I had to dial in about 50 yds more that what was on the turret at both ranges. But once I knew how it shot, I have never had any problems moving the dial around and getting repeatability of bullet impact.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-12-2012, 05:32 PM
Are the tactical dials idiot proof? What do I need to know if I was to go that route? I have not got into reloading, I've inherited some reloading supplies and am going to try it out someday. Do i need a chronograph for the dial turrets to know my exact velocity? Thanks for the suggestions.

Shooting long range is an involved process no matter which way you do it. A chronograph is essential equipment to me, but the work doesn't end there. Your chronographed muzzle velocities and published bullet Ballistic Coefficients (BCs) are a place to start. You use that info in a ballistic calculator (like JBM) to get data for your load. This should get you close. Then you need to verify and adjust your information with in-the-field shooting. Then you need to understand how elevation and temperture changes affect your drops.

After you get all that down pat, then you need to learn the voodoo of doping wind, and that is a bugger.

BDC reticles are approximate only. You need to verify and adjust those as well. Same with custom dials like those available from Leupold (CDS) and Vortex.

It is kind of complicated to get into, but pretty fun too.

ssliger
03-12-2012, 08:06 PM
Thanks for the advice. I needed to get this straightened out. I knew a lot was involved. I want to make sure all my ducks were in a row. You watch some of these advertisements and they make you feel as if it's as easy as point and click. I think I will start saving my gift certificates for the scope and try my hand at reloading.

Whisky
03-12-2012, 08:12 PM
Personally, I much prefer MOA or Mil turret adjustments vs a CDS type knob. With the CDS knobs you are limited to the load you had it set up for, as well as other atmospheric conditions. Say you live in the flat lands of ND for example, and want to take that rifle on a high altitude hunt. Your turrets will be off more than you can imagine. For LR work, 500+, that won't work out too well for you.

Get a MOA or Mil system, and learn how to use it. You'll be far better off in the end.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-12-2012, 08:13 PM
You watch some of these advertisements and they make you feel as if it's as easy as point and click.
Those guys are selling something, and it isn't responsible shooting. It just isn't that simple.

Investing in a legitimate long range precision marksman training (talk to your local Law Enforcement Agency), is a great way to get started the right way.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-12-2012, 08:18 PM
Personally, I much prefer MOA or Mil turret adjustments vs a CDS type knob. With the CDS knobs you are limited to the load you had it set up for, as well as other atmospheric conditions. Say you live in the flat lands of ND for example, and want to take that rifle on a high altitude hunt. Your turrets will be off more than you can imagine. For LR work, 500+, that won't work out too well for you.

Get a MOA or Mil system, and learn how to use it. You'll be far better off in the end.

That is interesting, Whisky, I also find somewhere past 500 is where those approximate systems lose their precision. I am with you, understanding angular measurement is the first crucial step to precision long range shooting.

SDbowhunter
03-12-2012, 09:25 PM
I'm relatively new to long range shooting but have been doing my research, for me the best piece of information was the dvd i bought "the art of the precision rifle" by Magpul dynamics. lots of good information on there and its 10 hours long. they teach you how to dope the wind and do elevation drops and use ballistic solvers, and they aren't trying to sell you a ballistic turret either. I've had my order for a vortex viper pst in for awhile, not gonna be here till june :( oh and if you are looking to get a ballistic solver like the JSM or the ATRAG from Horus vision, you might want to wait a little bit, Horus is coming out with a version that will work on your smart phone, so you won't need to carry around a PDA with all the other stuff!

Timberstalker
03-12-2012, 11:14 PM
I have a .300 win mag w/ Leupold 4x12 scope, It is more capible than I am. I don't spend the time mastering long range shooting, I can hit milk jugs @ 500 (which is long range to me), but I've never shot an animal that far with it. I just keep the wind right and try to keep my shots under 300 yrds. I don't think any of the above calibers or optics will dissapoint, more often than not, its the person behind the gun. There are some very good tips here, have fun! My only advise is don't get too caught up in shooting farter than you need to.

Ikeepitcold
03-12-2012, 11:42 PM
Is the 300 Win mag good for a long range shooter? This will probably be for target shooting only, just want some thoughts. Thanks.

Yes with the proper scope you will have no problem to 800+ with plenty of practice and a good range finder

Edelweiss
03-13-2012, 04:41 AM
Shooting long range is an involved process no matter which way you do it. A chronograph is essential equipment to me, but the work doesn't end there. Your chronographed muzzle velocities and published bullet Ballistic Coefficients (BCs) are a place to start. You use that info in a ballistic calculator (like JBM) to get data for your load. This should get you close. Then you need to verify and adjust your information with in-the-field shooting. Then you need to understand how elevation and temperture changes affect your drops.

After you get all that down pat, then you need to learn the voodoo of doping wind, and that is a bugger.

BDC reticles are approximate only. You need to verify and adjust those as well. Same with custom dials like those available from Leupold (CDS) and Vortex.

It is kind of complicated to get into, but pretty fun too.

This is pretty good, gouge, I shoot 1000-1400 yards for F-Class and we do a lot of long range hunting.

You need more than ballistic turret or dots can give you for anything over 800 yards, there are too many verables with humidity, temp, and elevation for any ballistic turret or ballistic dot system to work beyond 800.


Ammunition is much more important at 1000 yards than it is at 400. At 400 a 150 fps difference will be within an half of an inch of each other. At 1000 45 fps difference between rounds could change things 15 inches.

You need a way to know the pre- tran-sonic flight (PTSF) speed of the round you are shooting. A Chroni will only give you a guess after it the leaves the chroni, based on the BC of the bullet (published BC).

ssliger
03-13-2012, 12:12 PM
The main thing I want to get out of this is to become a better shot at all ranges. I am a confident shot out to 350 yards. I want to get to know my equipment like the back of my hand. So after a few years I would feel confident to 700. My main goal is and will always be a 1 shot kill. Thanks for all your suggestions. I don't want to come across as someone who takes his long range system right out the box and shoots at animals 1000 yards away.

BKC
03-13-2012, 04:06 PM
I agree with timberstalker. 500 yards is a long shot for me also. A lot of things go wrong after 500 yards. If I can't close up the distance on any big game animal to 500 yards then I don't need to be hunting that animal. I would rather put my faith in the stalk than a long shot. I have the equipment to shoot that far and am fine with 800 yards off the bench but field conditions are much much different. I think people watch too much T.V.

Elkoholic307
03-19-2012, 01:32 PM
The 300 Win. is a great LR choice.

As for the scope, that depends on your budget. Sightrons are inexpensive and are known for true, repeatable clicks.

My last bit of advice is to not let other people tell you how far to shoot. Only you can determine that.

crumy
08-27-2012, 10:56 PM
Did you get the 300? I have a ruger m77 and had I llluepold on it. Could shoot confident with it outdo 600 at he range in Laramie. looking to get a vortex scope on it.