PDA

View Full Version : Technology is taking the hunt out of hunting.



sellout
04-18-2012, 06:37 AM
Is modern technology making us better hunters? Does the so called top of the line equipment make us a better outdoorsman? Does a new custom rifle make you a better shooter? Does a high dollar scope make you more accurate? I say No to all of these questions.
I think that technology is good to a point, however people get too carried away with the latest and greatest. I also think that people depend on technology to make them a better hunter, when in reality the traditions of hunting are being lost with technology. I also feel that hunting is becoming a rich man’s sport and the equipment they buy is more and more a status symbol that just practical.
Does the $2000 rifle shoot any better than a $800 rifle? No. The gun that a person uses should be comfortable to them, feel good to them, and then they need to practice with it a lot to good with it. This also can be said with bows, I know that a $500 ready to hunt bow will kill just as many big game animals as the “top of the line” bow will.
Hunting should be fun, but I also think that people should have to work (hunt) at it a little. Technology is taking the hunt out of hunting

NoMoreOldNo7
04-18-2012, 07:10 AM
To some extent I agree with you, but I do believe that you buy the best you can afford in boots and optics. That being said I buy $150 boots not $400 and my binoculars are $800 not swarovski's. My rifles have Leupold & Nikon scopes and they are blue printed (btw, they were blue printed before thats even what it was called). But just because I don't wear matching top of the line apparel and have a $500 backpack that doesn't keep me from hunting. It's kind of like the guy that shows up at Bass Pro Shop in a $75,000 truck with all the latest and greatest gagets, my beat up Ford 4x4 gets me to where I'm going. Btw I have never been on a guided hunt, thats way out of my price range, but you will find me chasing Elk, Mulies and Antelope this fall in a couple different states. Not having money to blow on every little this and that will not keep me from spending my days in the marshes, woods and prairies.

labman
04-18-2012, 07:57 AM
I will agree with you on some things as well!! Boots and optics, buy what you can afford!! I buy my bows by feel and not price tag or magazine ads. My biggest issue I have is the clothes that are being produced (Sitka, Kuiu) for the price. I am 6'2" 290 and wear a 56 coat and 40 pant and all this gear is cut for a European model. I am in good shape run, road bike, mountain bike all the time. Think you Russell for producing gear big enough for the bigger man!! I learned early in my hunting life that its called hunting not killing and you can have the best of everything and still come home empty handed. It's how hard you prepare and hunt that makes the difference on your success not how expensive your gear is!!

Vanish
04-18-2012, 08:30 AM
This topic came up recently when I took my bow in to get new strings put on it. My bow is 13 years old. The guy at the shop was like, sure, i'll string it, but don't you think you should be looking into new bows? At first I was inclined to agree with him, but then it hit me. As long as this bow hasn't become physically broken, it will still put down animals like it did back in 1999.

Sure, I might be able to extend my range 20 yards by upgrading to the latest and greatest, but do I want to? I enjoy archery hunting, and to me that is all about getting within 40 yards. I can save the $$$ to get another tag!

Ikeepitcold
04-18-2012, 08:43 AM
I buy what I can afford. I also like to upgrade my gear if I can. I also thing that as far as boots and clothing you get what you pay for. I've spent alot of money on boots that have a life time no questions asked warranty. IMO why buy a new pair of boots every other year and spend more money in the long run. Also IMO the high dollar gun.... If you don't practice neither gun will perform, if you can't see the animal you searching for that a expensive scope or bino isn't gonna find them for you. My point is technology is only going to continue to grow in the hunting industry and it will make a good hunter a better hunter and a beginner hunter well without time in the field and practice the high dollar equipment he is using won't be used at its full potential unitll he gains the experience using it. With all that said no a guy does not need to have all the best gear to be a proficient hunter but it can help to be a more efficient hunter.

Bitterroot Bulls
04-18-2012, 08:57 AM
I agree that having sound hunting fundamentals is paramount, and that one can be a good, dedicated hunter without the best, newest gear.

However, I do think that once you have those fundamentals, better gear makes you a better hunter.

Better optics allow you to see more, especially early or late.

Laser rangefinders have taken the guesswork out of range estimation, which has aided both gun and bow hunters immensely.

Modern high-end hunting clothes are light years ahead of older clothing types in how they let your body work more naturally (breathability) and better protect it from the elements. This allows you hunt harder, longer, and safer.

GPS and communication devices provide a much safer backcountry experience.

Newer stuff is lighter, and lighter stuff allows you to hunt further and longer.

I appreciate the advantages of new technology in hunting.

Kevin Root
04-18-2012, 09:56 AM
I think it all comes down to each individual, their goals, skills and comfort zones. It also is important to note that one person's hunting style may differ to another. One person may want to go as far back as they can to their hunting roots in history and or heritage to get the most out of their hunting experience and that is what truly is important to them. Others are ok with using some modern technology to help make their hunting experience more successful and safer.

I'm one of those that likes hunting because of its primal heritage and roots. I like being in the outdoors and having the privilege to hunt animals. I'm one of those individuals that is ok with using some modern technology to help make their hunting experience more successful and safer.

A well placed legal hunting projectile weather it be a low dollar one to a high dollar one with the right amount of velocity kills. Is there a better or best way to do it? Perhaps that rests with each of us as individuals.

Old Hunter
04-18-2012, 10:48 AM
I'm old school, ans so is my gear. I paid $25 for used pair of Leupold binos. I don't even own a scope. I wouldn't own a GPS. I could go on, but it isn't important. We all have our own way of doing things.

I did draw the line with boots though. I bought a pair of Meindl boots 7 years ago for $225. I felt like a dummy for doing it then, but i've worn them everyday since, and they still look good. So, not a bad decision at all.

I think you're fine as long as you don't think money will make you a better hunter. Only time and hard work will do that.

honeybadger
04-18-2012, 11:25 AM
Finally, someone said it..money DOES NOT make you a better hunter or sportsman. My thoughts are that the high priced gun and the totally amazing optics gives a person a false sense of ability. They buy the pricey equipment assuming that they now will be able to take that rediculous shot, having never practiced the shot, but because they have the $2000 rifle and the $1800 scope they take the shot.
Stop believing the hype and watching stupid hunting shows. Everyone knows 90% of the time the show doesn't show the guy taking 10 shots but the guide screams "one shot kill"...
People need to learn there how there equipment operates. Guarantee I can grab a friend of mine who shoots his $800 rifle with his $600 scope regularly, and out shoot someone who has the $4000 setup all day...
Archery is no exception!!!

HuskyMusky
04-18-2012, 12:14 PM
I hope it never gets to the point to where the common man/avg hunter has to be able to shoot an elk at 800yds just to have a successful hunt.

I still think the majority of hunters go into the woods with a bow/rifle maybe a light pack with essential gear, binos, and hit the woods!

Jon Boy
04-18-2012, 01:07 PM
I honestly think the difference it makes is small as far as animals being harvested. The saying 10% of the hunters harvest 90% of the elk will always hold true with most every species. Id say most of those 10% arent decked out in sitka gear, wearing swaros around there neck, and shooting a custom rifle. They're just good hunters.

tim
04-18-2012, 06:05 PM
persoanlly, i don't think you should judge someone for what they have, but how they act. I have came accross rich slobs and poor slobs. Also have been around good hunters that where both rich and poor. Judge one by the actions, not the clothes.

Old Hunter
04-18-2012, 06:47 PM
persoanlly, i don't think you should judge someone for what they have, but how they act. I have came accross rich slobs and poor slobs. Also have been around good hunters that where both rich and poor. Judge one by the actions, not the clothes.

The difference is, the guy with the low cost gear doesn't think he's a good hunter because of his gear.

jenbickel
04-18-2012, 06:55 PM
I dont think that having the most expensive things makes you a better hunter or anything like that. I do think that having some of the new technology is good though. I know a lot of people that don't carry a gps or anything with them. Personally, I have 2 gorgeous kids that I love coming home to everynight and I will spend as much money as needed to have some of the top of the line technology. When I go out, I make sure I always have my gps, spot, iPhone and solar panel. Having those things isn't taking the hunt out of hunting. It doesn't tell me where the elk are bedded or eating. I think that with bows and guns, it doesn't matter the age. I buy expensive gear such as kenetrek boots, under armour gear and such because even though it cost a little more, I know it is going to stand up to the elements and it's going to last a long time. New technology doesn't make you a better hunter but it's designed to help you on your hunts but some of it does have upgrades and updates from stuff ten years ago that are very handy to have. I don't see any problem with using technology hunting and I don't think it makes me any less of a hunter. I just like to feel comfortable and have a sense of safety.

Fink
04-18-2012, 07:06 PM
I like top notch gear. I like clothes that are wind proof, light weight, and water proof. I like binos and scopes that don't fog. I like a bow that shoots flat, tight and smooth. I like to not get lost. And, I like boots that only hurt my feet a little. If I have to pay a little more for said gear, then it's worth it.

But, I'll never dog a guy for not having top of the line gear, and I'll never attribute my success as a hunter to my gear, cause I know how hard I've really worked to learn the things that have made me the hunter that I am.

Timberstalker
04-18-2012, 07:18 PM
The technology that helps me the most is Google Earth. I can study new areas before I hunt them and learn the terrain, so that I like. I just got a GPS (don't know how to use it), I have a range finder (I usually forget to use it) I hunt deer with the my 40yr old rifle with a 26yr old Leupold scope, my elk rifle is 14 years old and cost $400. I bought a new bow last year for $500 and it killed my bull last year with no problem. Some new stuff does help, but I dont think you need the newest, most expensive gear to be a good hunter. In fact I think some new stuff makes for sloppy hunters. The one thing I don't understand is the $10,000 four wheeler, thats more than my truck cost! I dont own a four wheeler and don't plan on it either. I typiacly hunt where they wouldn't do any good anyways. I would rather save my money for fuel to go hunting/scouting than to spend it on expensive gear. One thing I've always loved about hunting is that it doesnt have to cost much money to be successful.

Old Hunter
04-18-2012, 07:22 PM
Ok, I spent a lot on my version of a 4wheeler, but I use it for more than hunting.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v76/Jamnut/Picture_002.jpg

Timberstalker
04-18-2012, 07:31 PM
I like that four wheeler! I have a couple of Jeeps too, don't use them much for hunting anymore though.

Fink
04-18-2012, 07:43 PM
That is a sweet lookin rig Old Hunter!

Bitterroot Bulls
04-18-2012, 07:56 PM
I like top notch gear. I like clothes that are wind proof, light weight, and water proof. I like binos and scopes that don't fog. I like a bow that shoots flat, tight and smooth. I like to not get lost. And, I like boots that only hurt my feet a little. If I have to pay a little more for said gear, then it's worth it.

But, I'll never dog a guy for not having top of the line gear, and I'll never attribute my success as a hunter to my gear, cause I know how hard I've really worked to learn the things that have made me the hunter that I am.

Great post Fink. I agree completely.

Jon Boy
04-18-2012, 08:04 PM
Old Hunter, awesome heep! Im a jeep fanatic ha ha built an 89 YJ from the ground up through out high school. Miss that thing.

Old Hunter
04-18-2012, 08:08 PM
I love Jeeps too. Been 4wheeling for 40 years.

Grantbvfd
04-18-2012, 08:50 PM
I agree with Fink.

Another thing on sellouts question. Is the hunt still there? Camo is technology, centerfire rifles are technology, compound bows are technology...... Should we all hunt with a homemade recurve and a loin cloth?

Old Hunter
04-18-2012, 09:19 PM
A loin cloth at 12,000 ft might be a little chilly.

Kevin Root
04-18-2012, 10:25 PM
I agree with Fink.

Another thing on sellouts question. Is the hunt still there? Camo is technology, centerfire rifles are technology, compound bows are technology...... Should we all hunt with a homemade recurve and a loin cloth?

Good point Grantbvfd. The only thing is that homemade recurve and loin cloth falls into technology too :). All of us that hunt use technology to some extent. Below is the definition I found on Wikapedia.

Technology is the making, usage, and knowledge of tools, machines, techniques, crafts, systems or methods of organization in order to solve a problem or perform a specific function.

I just hope that everyone has a safe and successful hunt useing the level of technology they are most comfortable both buying and useing on their adventures.

dhershberger
04-18-2012, 11:29 PM
Technology is pricey but great! Its especially important for the bowhunter because I dont know about you guys but no matter how much technology I have, i still get busted by many animals each year. I like having an edge because sometimes times it is the difference between success and failure in the woods. Thats part of the reason why I'm a camo freak and I'm very particular about how my gear works and I test it before each hunt. But like most things in life, gear and gizmos can't replace good old hard work, effort, and sweat. I guarantee you that a new bow, rifle, or set of binoculars isn't going to get you in better shape or farther into the backcountry.

MOHunter
04-19-2012, 06:15 AM
I have no problem with technology advancements like GPS, better clothes and boots, etc. You still need to be a very good hunter even if you have them. I do agree with the idea of hunting becoming a rich man's sport. And I attribute that to losing hunting ground. We all know the story of our favorite hunting spot that was purchased by some rich man who now charges thousands of dollars to hunt on that ground. When states cater to these ranchers with their own special tags it just promotes the situation. And it's even worse here in the midwest. In KS and MO there is very little public ground, relatively speaking, and farmers can get thousands of dollars for hunting rights. The private land costs the same to access, and there is a fraction of the public land available.

mcseal2
04-19-2012, 08:12 AM
I like technology personally, but I don't think it takes the place of hunting knowledge and shooting ability. A hunter still has to find, get close to, and make a killing shot on an animal to take it regardless of equipment used.

I've known people with cheap gear that were rude, lazy, and broke every law in the book to get their game. I've known rich people who thought they could buy their way to whatever they wanted and felt entitled to hunt on anybody's land they wanted to. I use the term "people" not "hunters" there for a reason. I've also known great guys in both classes, there are good and bad in every bunch.

Also on a side note, not everyone who has nice gear is conceited and rich. I have some Sitka, Russel, and Core 4 clothing that I've put together over the past 4yrs by watching ebay and camofire. Much of it was used when I got it and doesn't match, but it still works. I have a couple nice sets of binos, Vortex and Minox, that I saved up for, then used the trading and price match features of SWFA to get bought. Same with my ED50 spotter, I waited and watched until Natchez Shooters Supply came out with their deal this year. My gunsmith a mile down the road has built my custom rifles at a discounted rate as we trade almost everything back and forth. My custom guns aren't fancy and pretty but accurate and functional. I have between 1/3 and 1/2 of the cost in my gear that it should have cost new. I'm not out to waste money but quality gear is often easier to use and less likely to fail when you need it most. Also with quality gear you can buy once and hunt for years without upgrading, or if you choose to upgrade your old gear still has value you can get back by trading or ebay.

Kevin Root
04-19-2012, 08:26 AM
Hunting going over to the private land does seems like it is getting more prevalent or at least if you count up all the hunting TV shows it sure looks like a high percentage to me. Some states have had that issue for quite a while now just because they have very little public hunting land in their state to begin with. My hope is that we will continue to be able to hunt and to be able to hunt public land. There is some awesome public land hunting out there still.

Some folks in my neck of the woods, even though we have a lot of public hunting land prefer to just pay for a hunting lease or pay to hunt private land. It's not that they were or are real rich but hunting public can be much harder and more leg work to find public hunting honey holes or to draw premium tags. A hunter can get on some private land, pay for a hunting lease, get their animal and see a lot of animals to choose from instead of driving across the country and paying non resident tag fees. I've been guilty a time or two doing that myself, although getting something on public land in my state or another is just more gratifying, more of an accomplishment and more of an adventure to me.

Are far as me buying modern technology for status? That's just not my case. I'm just trying to help my success however slim or non existent that may be. I'm trying to keep myself safer, and as I get older perhaps aid in my comfort level in the backcountry however slim those levels are or are not. That's just my intent.

buckbull
04-19-2012, 12:52 PM
Is modern technology making us better hunters? Does the so called top of the line equipment make us a better outdoorsman? Does a new custom rifle make you a better shooter? Does a high dollar scope make you more accurate? I say No to all of these questions.


I'll actually say Yes to all these questions. Better clothing such as sitka and russel keeps a person more comfortable in the elements and more time in the field. Better boots can get a person further back into the high country for a better chance at game. Most custom rifiles will outshoot a production rifle any day of the week. High dollar scopes are certainly more accurate during low light conditions. They will also hold up to more abuse keep their zero much better than cheaper scopes.

Of the few hunting related websites I go to there always seems to be class warfare topic pop up. There is nothing wrong with making lots of money. There is nothing wrong with buying top tier gear if you can afford it. If any of us had a money tree out back, I'm certain that most of us would all buy top tier gear.

Old Hunter
04-19-2012, 01:12 PM
I'm glad you said most. :)

Zim
04-19-2012, 01:46 PM
I think technology actually made a much bigger impact on the communication side: Computers, GPS, cell phones. Computers really changed things. It's so much easier for everyone everywhere to apply for tags, get information about units & hunts, scout via aerials, etc., etc. Dang when I started applying in 1995 there was virtually none of that yet. Draw odds were way, way easier for the best tropy hunts everywhere. Since then everyone is in the game and odds have skyrocketed. States have taken advantage by making a lot of money selling guys the opportunity to NOT hunt.

NoMoreOldNo7
04-19-2012, 02:31 PM
I had a real issue with this thread yesterday, in fact it went as far as thinking I would just drop this site from my list. But sometime through the night it came to me that it is not this site or the people posting to this thread that I have a problem with, the problem is me. There is just a lot of acceptance to where I am at today, nothing more that I have to learn to deal with. I do appreciate the post from Jon Boy and tim. Ethics and experience go a lot further to what I consider a good hunter rather than how money someone spends to go afield. I have witnessed both side of the coin as far as hunters go, good and bad hunters with and without money. How much money you spend has nothing to do with integrity and skill. These expensive toys can help out no doubt about it, but you will find me out in the field with the same Remington 700 7RM I got when I was 15, a 20 year old Leupold scope, 20 year old Busnell spotter and a wool shirt treeking through the ridges of the west this fall. I could be more comphy in the latest apparel, maybe get one more ridge with top of the line boots and maybe one less trip packing an Elk out to the truck, but that is not going to stop me from hunting, not now or never, at least as long as I can still physically do it.

Bitterroot Bulls
04-19-2012, 04:54 PM
I'm not sure how this thread went down the class warfare path, but I thought the thread was about if technology has taken the hunt out of hunting, and if it helped the hunter.

I think that people that use good equipment as an excuse to be slob hunters are just slob hunters, but the equipment doesn't make them such. they just are.

Good hunting gear are just tools. Good hunting is a skill.

Fink
04-19-2012, 07:16 PM
Good hunting gear are just tools. Good hunting is a skill.

Tru dat. :)

MOHunter
04-19-2012, 08:52 PM
I'm not sure how this thread went down the class warfare path, but I thought the thread was about if technology has taken the hunt out of hunting, and if it helped the hunter.


I probably didn't help the situation with my post. I was not trying to start an argument about class warfare. I am a financial advisor to high net worth individuals and have nothing against them. I just read into the original question that some people use money rather than skill to accomplish their hunting goals. My point is that I think that is true when it comes to hunting property, not technological advancements to help in our hunts.

Coming from Missouri and having to basically learn about western hunting completely on my own I can say that satellite, GPS, and certainly the internet have helped in making it available to me. It may make for more crowded applications, but I now at least have a chance at taking an iconic big game animal like a bull elk in the Rocky Mountains.

Thanks to great guys like you all I'm able to put a hunt together and know what gear is needed to make it an enjoyable experience.

Joe Hulburt
04-19-2012, 09:14 PM
There is too much emphasis on gizmo's that will aid in finding success lately IMO. Broadheads that will compensate for horrible shot placement, nocks that guide you in the dark, rifles off the shelf that can shoot a half a mile. Nothing in the ads talks about learning the fundamentals of hunting etc....

I don't think all the hype over gizmo's really amounts to many more kills but it does confuse people as to what it takes to get it done.

Timberstalker
04-19-2012, 09:29 PM
Technology make things easier, thats pretty much it. We all use some level of technology. I do believe some poeple think technology will compensate for lack of skill and desire, thats a misconception IMO.

Old Hunter
04-20-2012, 08:24 AM
I keep reading that technology makes hunting easier. I think that's where we have the dividing line here. Other than the clothing that makes us more comfortable. Some of us don't want the hunt to be easier. I want a hunt to be hard. I want to be challenged to my limit. For me, the hunt is everything. Not the kill.

My dad was the best hunter i've ever known. It's true I might be a little biased, but he got an elk every year. He did it the old way, with old equipment. I've seen him turn down shots that baffled me. I'd ask him.."why didn't you you shoot dad?" He'd simple say...."too easy son." It took me many years to understand that.

BobT
04-20-2012, 09:30 AM
I keep reading that technology makes hunting easier. I think that's where we have the dividing line here. Other than the clothing that makes us more comfortable. Some of us don't want the hunt to be easier. I want a hunt to be hard. I want to be challenged to my limit. For me, the hunt is everything. Not the kill.

I use a BLM map to make sure I'm in the right hunting unit. I use a GPS to make sure I'm not trespassing. I use a cell phone to let my wife know I'm okay. I don't have a problem hunting hard, I have a bad back that would make it impossible to pack out a deer or pronghorn in a laundry bag so I have an Eberlestock pack. I enjoy hunting whether I kill anything or not but make no mistake, I hunt to kill stuff, if I didn't I could save a ton of money on tags, guns, packs and a lot of other stuff and just look at animals. For me the kill is the climax of a successful hunt and in fact what hunting is all about.

Bob

Old Hunter
04-20-2012, 09:40 AM
I use a BLM map to make sure I'm in the right hunting unit. I use a GPS to make sure I'm not trespassing. I use a cell phone to let my wife know I'm okay. I don't have a problem hunting hard, I have a bad back that would make it impossible to pack out a deer or pronghorn in a laundry bag so I have an Eberlestock pack. I enjoy hunting whether I kill anything or not but make no mistake, I hunt to kill stuff, if I didn't I could save a ton of money on tags, guns, packs and a lot of other stuff and just look at animals. For me the kill is the climax of a successful hunt and in fact what hunting is all about.

Bob

I was simply pointing out my way. I never asked you to do it my way.

I really don't care how you do it. That would be your way.

BKC
04-20-2012, 10:26 AM
I have read thru the entire thread but I apoligize if I repest a prior post. I have hunted with some real num nuts before that couldn't possibly be helped by technolgy. They couldn't tell direction of the wind from direction to the mall. They made enough noise in the woods to scare every living creature within 1000 yards. They did not have the skills to be a good hunter. Not saying that people don't get lucky but this is normally not the case with this type of hunter. You have to have basic underlying skills if you want technology to help you out. I would love to have the new 1000 hp ford mustang but I would probably have it wrapped around the first telephone pole on the highway. I just don't have the skill for that technology.

Now a good hunter with good skills can be helped by technolgy. If you understand your equipment and know what differences it can make to have just a little bit better equipment ( technolgy) then it can improve your abilities.

My first rifle ( 30.06 springfield 03a3 ) pales in comparison to what I shoot now but it still killed game. I wore flannel for years and got soaked to the bone but still managed to stay out in the field. I never owned a gps untill I couldn't find where I tied up my horses in a heavy snow ( I did eventually find them after dark). Having basic skills is the prerequisite for sucess.

Now about the money. Financially, it is suppose to get easier to afford the things you want as you get older. Not always the case but basically that is the way it happens. Some people have money from day one and some people have to work their a$$ off just to make do. Don't knock anyone for how they dress or what equip they own. If they have it or don't have it, WHO CARES! Just go hunt. You can't buy skill.

Umpqua Hunter
04-20-2012, 11:35 AM
Dang, I think I'm gonna sell all my gear.

This fall I'm only hunting by throwing a rock, since using a sling to hurl it would be too technologically advanced. I'll walk to wherever it is I am going hunting since driving my truck is using technology only available in the last 100 year or so. Fortunately for me there are deer, elk, turkeys and waterfowl near my house. Of course I'll be barefoot, better begin to toughen those feet up now. I'll only eat what I kill or plants or seeds that I find, nothing from the grocery store for me. I'll only drink water as I find it. Fortunately there is a large pond nearby. Unfortunately it will likely have giardia after a warm summer, but no water filters or chlorine tablets for me. I'll cup my hands to drink it, to use a container would certainly be a no no. I'll cook over an open fire but only with fire I discover from a lightening strike. I'd hate to use matches or even a bow and stick to get the fire going. No caves nearby so I will have to figure out a shelter, which I can fashion using only my bare hands using no tools whatsoever. I'll only clothe myself with clothes I make from the things I find or kill, though I am really not sure how I'll skin the animal yet as I would hate to use a pointy stick or even a rock that I chipped into a knife. Then again would using clothes, even clothes that I made be violating the spirit of the hunt? I'm not quite sure if I should buy a tag or not, since I would have to purchase the tag using money, a tool for trade. Besides the tag is printed on thermal paper, an advancement in the last 20 years or so. Also to hunt only during the open season would be to observe laws derived from biological science used to manage wildlife.

That doesn't sound like much fun, maybe I'll take up golf. But hasn't technology given us unfair advantages from the golfing legends of the past, such as clubs with huge sweet spots. I know, for a ball I will go to the river and look for a perfectly spherical rock, then find a stick about as long as my leg with a 110 degree bend near one end and .........

Actually, I'm grateful for the times we live in, and we are blessed like no other generation to have lived on this planet. :)

Kevin Root
04-20-2012, 12:01 PM
Dang, I think I'm gonna sell all my gear.

This fall I'm only hunting by throwing a rock, since using a sling to hurl it would be too technologically advanced. I'll walk to wherever it is I am going hunting since driving my truck is using technology only available in the last 100 year or so. Fortunately for me there are deer, elk, turkeys and waterfowl near my house. Of course I'll be barefoot, better begin to toughen those feet up now. I'll only eat what I kill or plants or seeds that I find, nothing from the grocery store for me. I'll only drink water as I find it. Fortunately there is a large pond nearby. Unfortunately it will likely have giardia after a warm summer, but no water filters or chlorine tablets for me. I'll cup my hands to drink it, to use a container would certainly be a no no. I'll cook over an open fire but only with fire I discover from a lightening strike. I'd hate to use matches or even a bow and stick to get the fire going. No caves nearby so I will have to figure out a shelter, which I can fashion using only my bare hands using no tools whatsoever. I'll only clothe myself with clothes I make from the things I find or kill, though I am really not sure how I'll skin the animal yet as I would hate to use a pointy stick or even a rock that I chipped into a knife. Then again would using clothes, even clothes that I made be violating the spirit of the hunt? I'm not quite sure if I should buy a tag or not, since I would have to purchase the tag using money, a tool for trade. Besides the tag is printed on thermal paper, an advancement in the last 20 years or so. Also to hunt only during the open season would be to observe laws derived from biological science used to manage wildlife.

That doesn't sound like much fun, maybe I'll take up golf. But hasn't technology given us unfair advantages from the golfing legends of the past, such as clubs with huge sweet spots. I know, for a ball I will go to the river and look for a perfectly spherical rock, then find a stick about as long as my leg with a 110 degree bend near one end and .........

Actually, I'm grateful for the times we live in, and we are blessed like no other generation to have lived on this planet. :)

This made Friday a bit better for me Umpqua Hunter and made me chuckle. I was blessed by this post :).

I also see where others on the thread are coming from a bit in wanting to hunt the way they do, with what they have been given and or honor their heritage or what was passed down to them. I'm thankful to all that have posted here and to have heard their thoughts.

sjsmallfield
04-20-2012, 05:23 PM
Thanks Umpqua I needed that. Today has been kinda slow at the shop. LMAO

Ikeepitcold
04-22-2012, 02:43 PM
This was on Ike's Blog. Thought it was appropriate for this thread.



These days with cell phones taking the place of laptops and laptops taking the place of tower computers – not to mention tablets and MP3 players – it’s safe to say technology is moving much faster than anyone thought it would. You can be driving down the highway at 75 miles per hour talking to your hunting buddy on the phone, getting driving directions to the closest fuel station on your GPS, listening to your MP3 player and checking your draw results for Wyoming sheep, moose and mountain goat all at the same time. I would say this is the definition of multitasking. In fact, it’s down right dangerous, because you are not paying attention to the thing that threatens your life. Driving!! So please concentrate on driving and do everything you can to do that safely.

Technology is a great thing; it allows us to do more things at the same time, get updated information at light speed and communicate with people all over the world at the same speed. There is a hitch in technology, though, when companies, people or agencies don’t keep up with the changes.

I was talking to my sister the other day, who works for our local school district. She mentioned that she has been busy inputting a stack of reports at least 24 inches tall from teachers. Being the entrepreneur that I am and the admiral for efficiencies, I asked, “What program do the teachers give it to you in and why can’t they just input it once and it uploads to the other required places?” Her non-verbal response was a deep sigh and a roll of the eyes. Her verbally response was, “A different program.” Then she went on to complain how inefficient the district is, because they have to do so many reports in so many systems, and all of it is for track-ability to the State and Federal government, but it’s the same information over and over again in each database. The entire time I was thinking that with all of this technology, why can’t they make this more efficient? It seems like in these times you either move with technology or you get left behind.

Later that day, I got on the Wyoming Game & Fish website to try and apply for my resident antelope, elk, and deer tags. I kept getting a message – “ERROR – Browser not supported (Requires Internet Explorer 6.x or Netscape 7.x)”.


The Wyoming Game and Fish website needs a little more than an overhaul.
So I asked the guys in my office who would know what this means and they get this blank look on their faces and say, “I’m not sure we have a computer in the office that old!) OLD, what does that mean? Apparently Netscape is not even supported any longer (for those tech-deficient people like me) that means it isn’t really in use anymore. They have changed it to something else. Microsoft Explorer is upgrading all of their customers to Explorer 10.x. So I ask them, “You are telling me that I have to go down in the basement and get a computer that has not been in service for two years, hook it up and then apply for my licenses on it?”

What did I do last year? Apparently we had one computer in our shipping and receiving that still had the old Explorer on it. It has since been upgraded for security reasons -which, by the way, according to what I am hearing, there are some serous security issues with Explorer 6 – 8.

So as I am using this old system, which is like going back to blue-screen technology, it dawns on me that I have to put my personal information, credit card number and mailing address into this archaic system. So I ask the question, “What would it take for some smart hacker, somewhere, to break into this system and steal the personal identity of hundreds of thousands of hunters?” I also asked the question, “Why would a department that is 100% self-funded by the sale of hunting tags and fishing licenses make applying and purchasing those licenses so hard to complete? Does this scare or make sense to anyone else?

I wonder what is going to happen to my identity? Well at least they are making it harder to apply, which could mean my draw odds will be better, because not everyone has a computer in their basement that OLD.

As always, thanks for your support and I hope you find yourself with a great tag in hand this summer and a true trophy this fall.


Show Season Wrap Up

Ikeepitcold
04-22-2012, 02:51 PM
Oh and by the way UH I almost fell of the stool I was sitting on with internal laughter after reading your post! Now that how you BREAK it DOWN!!!! I am at the local watering hole and had to contain myself.

Old Hunter
04-22-2012, 03:02 PM
I guess if I had to depend on computer software to kill an elk. I'd be in trouble.

My 60 year old Woolrich jacket still keeps me warm while hunting. :)

Umpqua Hunter
04-22-2012, 03:32 PM
Glad you guys had fun with that...I was cracking up writing it :)

Bitterroot Bulls
04-22-2012, 03:34 PM
I guess if I had to depend on computer software to kill an elk. I'd be in trouble.

My 60 year old Woolrich jacket still keeps me warm while hunting. :)

I don't know, OH, I think you are on the cutting edge in technology with that Woolrich. Wool fabric hunting clothes are all the rage in high-tech hunting wear right now. Funny how things come around ...

Old Hunter
04-22-2012, 03:47 PM
I don't know, OH, I think you are on the cutting edge in technology with that Woolrich. Wool fabric hunting clothes are all the rage in high-tech hunting wear right now. Funny how things come around ...

The red and black plaid seems to work as good as the latest camo too. :)

Old Hunter
04-22-2012, 04:02 PM
Camo at it's finest.

http://i266.photobucket.com/albums/ii266/GrimmSS70/PICT1466_2.jpg

MOHunter
04-22-2012, 06:45 PM
Just out of curiosity, when was that pic taken? It looks like it could have been any time in the last 60 years!

Old Hunter
04-22-2012, 06:58 PM
No idea when, but 50-60's is a good guess.

Elkoholic307
04-28-2012, 06:06 PM
What a bunch of hog wash. Technology is not taking the hunt out of hunting.

I've been far more successful with my 'latest and greatest' stuff. Hunting has also become more enjoyable with technology.

Example: I've seen a lot of things already with my nice binos that I wouldn't have with my old cruddy ones.

Old Hunter
04-28-2012, 06:22 PM
What a bunch of hog wash. Technology is not taking the hunt out of hunting.

I've been far more successful with my 'latest and greatest' stuff. Hunting has also become more enjoyable with technology.

Example: I've seen a lot of things already with my nice binos that I wouldn't have with my old cruddy ones.

Wouldn't matter if you didn't shoot 1000yds. :)

Elkoholic307
04-29-2012, 09:36 AM
Still holding on to that?

Good glass matters at all distances.

Old Hunter
04-29-2012, 09:45 AM
I was joking around, but to get serious for a second. You still don't get the topic.

Elkoholic307
04-29-2012, 12:41 PM
I'm pretty sure I do. I haven't lost any traditions due to technology.

I believe that's what the original poster was getting at. What do you think the topic is?

Old Hunter
04-29-2012, 12:48 PM
For me. Any technology that helps get the shots further out, is getting away from tradition. The tradition I grew up with anyway.

homegrown
04-29-2012, 05:07 PM
Not that it matters anyway but that picture of all the guys standing there in plaid wool looks way more recent than 50-60's by some of the rubber boots and other articles of clothing, looks like a east coast picture? Some people get a little carried away on here, do it your way I'll do it mine.

Old Hunter
04-29-2012, 05:58 PM
I was just showing the red and black plaid wool. Something i've worn since the 50's.

Wouldn't you laugh if you saw me dressed like that in the mountains? Why shouldn't I laugh at 1000 yd shots?

It keeps things in balance.

jenbickel
04-29-2012, 07:34 PM
The bickering reminds me of my kids. I kinda wanna send y'all to time out and tell you if you can't say anything nice, don't say anythin at all.

Old Hunter
04-29-2012, 08:25 PM
Well, if you can't take a little ribbing dad. You need to lighten up.

I've found out in my old age to not take life so serious. You might too someday.

Elkoholic307
04-30-2012, 07:53 PM
Why shouldn't I laugh at 1000 yd shots?

This thread is still not about that.

Old Hunter
04-30-2012, 08:15 PM
This thread is still not about that.

I never said it was. (sort of) It's just fun to bring it up. :)

Drhorsepower
04-30-2012, 08:30 PM
This thread cracks me up. Arguing about technology while using technology to do it. Is there time for me to make a second batch of popcorn?

Muleys 24/7
04-30-2012, 09:02 PM
This thread cracks me up. Arguing about technology while using technology to do it. Is there time for me to make a second batch of popcorn?
This should be a big enough bowl,lolhttp://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff431/JKjeepin24/popcorn.jpg

bluedunn0
04-30-2012, 09:07 PM
Just hunt.....

Drhorsepower
04-30-2012, 09:12 PM
Sweet thanks muley! I'll grab the candy and pop.

Old Hunter
04-30-2012, 09:21 PM
Who's got the Peanut M&M's?

Elkoholic307
05-02-2012, 07:52 PM
This thread cracks me up. Arguing about technology while using technology to do it. Is there time for me to make a second batch of popcorn?

Just for the record, I am arguing for technology. Old Hunter is arguing against it. ;)

Old Hunter
05-02-2012, 07:57 PM
I'm saying it doesn't make you a better hunter. I'm not arguing against it.

I'm not even arguing. Just giving my opinion.

Elkoholic307
05-02-2012, 08:14 PM
I still think technology has made me a much better hunter.

Haven't you ever used Google Earth to look at your hunting areas?

Old Hunter
05-02-2012, 08:32 PM
I looked at Google Earth, but I could get the same thing from a map. Google Earth makes it easier, but does that make you a better hunter? It can all be done the old way of getting your boots dirty.

We have a different outlook on hunting. Neither way is better. They're just different. I've explained how my dad taught me to hunt. Easy is never the way for my dad, and it isn't for me either. It's hard for me to put in words. It took years for me to learn, and I can't explain it in a post.

I wish I could write better. I'd write a book.

Elkoholic307
05-02-2012, 08:38 PM
We agree to disagree.

CoHiCntry
05-02-2012, 09:15 PM
We agree to disagree.

Could this really be the end??? One can only hope... :p

Old Hunter
05-02-2012, 09:28 PM
Never say "the end" to an old guy.

Elkoholic307
05-02-2012, 10:55 PM
Could this really be the end??? One can only hope... :p

I didn't realize we had so many fans.

Seems like everyone is making this into a bigger deal than it actually is.

Colorado Cowboy
05-03-2012, 06:49 AM
I am another "old hunter"! I've been hunting big game (started with deer) for 60 years. Guess thats why I'm a better deer hunter than anything else. When I look at some new country, I just get this "feeling" where the deer are going to be. Yep....boots on the ground and seeing it live. Lots of the newer technology is great. I have and use a great range finder even tho I can guestimate ranges really good. I have and use my chronograph when I work on my new reloads. My new rainwear and hunting clothes are lots better than what I used to use, but nothing IMHO beats my old GI canteen and webbelt. Todays new boots are the best (I have several pairs), but I still wear my 30 year old Browning all leather, waterproof, vibrim soled boots, been resoled 4 times and repaired too many times to remember.

Us old farts are set in our ways...thay work for use. Hard to change that. I don't do social media or text on my phone. The only reason I changed my reloads in my 30-06 is I ran out of the surplus 4895 powder I've been using for 50 years. I prefer Sierra & Nosler bullets I've used forever. When I was the Director of Production Research Engineering at a large aerospace co. before I retired, I used to tell my people "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".

Old Hunter
05-03-2012, 08:34 AM
I think this thread went wrong, because the original question was lost. If the question was..."Does technology make hunting easier?" The answer would have to be yes, and it would have been a short thread.

It wasn't though. The question was...."Does technology make you a better hunter?" My answer to that is no, but that depends on how you define a "hunter"? That's where we had a problem.

Maybe we should have a new thread on..........What do you think a good hunter is? That would be a good one. :)