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View Full Version : aim low and high?



ivorytip
06-24-2012, 06:35 AM
ok, im going to swallow my pride on this but i think its a question alot of hunters ask them selves and friends a few tim each year. when im shooting down a steep slope or up a steep slope is my bullet going to rise or drop? i missed a deer last year with my 338 from 50yards, standin still and it was above me at a very steep angle. i dont miss, i take my time and make sure everything is right, what happened? it was a nice 4x fyi, 170sh. wasnt cool. 338 was sighted in at 100 for that hunt if that means anything.

Old Hunter
06-24-2012, 07:51 AM
Aim low for up and down slopes.

ivorytip
06-24-2012, 08:32 AM
thank you. makes sense!

Elkoholic307
06-24-2012, 09:07 AM
How steep of angle? I wouldn't think it would make a difference at 50 yards.

What's the load info for that 338?

Muleys 24/7
06-24-2012, 10:14 AM
How steep of angle? I wouldn't think it would make a difference at 50 yards.


I'm pretty sure it makes a difference because I did the same thing a couple years back with my .300 WBY , It was the same scenario..about a 50 yard shot down hill at about an 60 degree angle. I fired off 3 rounds and missed every time the buck didn't even move till I was done, I couldn't belive it! After that trip, I took my gun to the range and it was dead on off the bench.

ivorytip
06-24-2012, 10:23 AM
i was elk hunting and the 338 was hot with 225. also it was my first time hunting with that gun. it was 50-60angle. blasted a cow with the same load at 100 and her cud chewing days were over fast, it was a flat shot. ive hunted with my 270 since i was 12 (31now) and never had that prob. guess i should hit the range and practice slope shots to see in person. i hte shooting two dollar a shot practice shots though:cool:

Muleys 24/7
06-24-2012, 10:30 AM
Yea, those rounds anit cheap.

Elkoholic307
06-24-2012, 01:07 PM
No offense, but it sounds like you haven't shot the gun enough. What kind of groups are you getting at 100?

Also, how are you guys measuring these angles? Where I hunt bear, it's a confirmed 30 degree angle, 230 yard shot to the bait. Looks A LOT steeper than it actually is and if I didn't know any better I'd hold too low and most likely miss. I figured it out before I ever had a shot opportunity and found the difference is only an inch.

100 yard zero, 50 yard shot on a deer... that's a very big target at point blank range. I still don't think angle would throw the shot off that bad. But, maybe it would if the angle really was 60 degrees.

NoMoreOldNo7
06-24-2012, 01:49 PM
Check out another thread on 'General Hunting" titled "Incline and decline shots" dated 05/01/2012 (http://www.eastmans.com/forum/showthread.php/2647-Incline-and-Decline-Shots) we covered this then.

Btw, doesn't matter if its incline or decline, aim as if the distance is shorter. The gravity effect on the bullet is based on actual distance not distance to the target. There's a graph I put together there that explains it better. Easier to explain on a graph rather than in words.

BobT
06-24-2012, 02:02 PM
Your point of aim should be whatever the horizontal distance to the target is. On a 50 yard shot if you were holding for the center of the heart/lung area I would think you should still make a killing shot. I'm pretty sure I can reload a .338 WM for quite a bit less than $2.00 a shot. I'm going on the assumption that you are shooting handloads since you said " hot with 225". If you don't hand load you should be able to find something less expensive to practice with.

Bob

ivorytip
06-24-2012, 02:13 PM
im assuming it was about 60. when id hunt from a tree stand i knew that to be 40 and whent from there but not certain, and u r right i havent shot it enough and am thinking thats most my prob. getting use to recoil and all. bobt, i shoot federal prem. would love to start reloading and save big bucks. and it sounds like it was a bad shot all in all, i was hopeing for an excuse.

ivorytip
06-24-2012, 02:19 PM
just checked ou that older post, thanks that put it into perspective. as for all u long distance shooters, check out the book , "marine sniper", great read. thanks guys!

CrimsonArrow
06-24-2012, 04:55 PM
Misses happen, good hunters learn from them and get better

HuskyMusky
06-24-2012, 06:21 PM
essentially you always shoot for the X yardage.


so if the target is 350yards, and only 300yds horizontally, use your 300yd mark!

I think for the most part guys make angled shots more difficult than they are.

Old Hunter
06-24-2012, 08:33 PM
I just use kentucky windage. Works pretty good if you don't think about it too much.

Murdy
06-24-2012, 09:35 PM
Being a midwest, tree stand, whitetail, bowhunter, I bought the Leupold rangefinder that's compensates for elevation. Most of the time, I range something, and it says it's 32 yards, and I should shoot it as 29. Generally, not enough difference to cause me to shoot it any different. Can't imagine 60 yards would be that much more of a difference.

Old Hunter
06-24-2012, 10:34 PM
Being a midwest, tree stand, whitetail, bowhunter, I bought the Leupold rangefinder that's compensates for elevation. Most of the time, I range something, and it says it's 32 yards, and I should shoot it as 29. Generally, not enough difference to cause me to shoot it any different. Can't imagine 60 yards would be that much more of a difference.

Your arrow is dropping like a rock. The bullet is rising.

BobT
06-25-2012, 05:27 AM
Your arrow is dropping like a rock. The bullet is rising.

Bullets start dropping the instant they leave the barrel, it has to do with something called gravity!

CrimsonArrow
06-25-2012, 06:52 AM
Bullets start dropping the instant they leave the barrel, it has to do with something called gravity!

Agreed, bullets never rise, unless they're equipped with wings and a rocket engine

Colorado Cowboy
06-25-2012, 06:56 AM
The bullet (in relation to line of sight) starts out below your line of sight, raises above it and then meets it at the point of impact. Depends on how you sightin the rifle where the bullet strikes at impact. On my 45-70 BP Sharps the bullet raises to something like 20' feet above line of sight at really long distances (up to 1K yards for me).

The situation described would be a "hold dead on" with my elk rifle, a .300 Wby.

Old Hunter
06-25-2012, 07:57 AM
Bullets start dropping the instant they leave the barrel, it has to do with something called gravity!

Line of sight. I assumed you'd know what I was saying? It is the topic.

Colorado Cowboy
06-25-2012, 08:55 AM
Not too difficult to understand...BUT the real challenge is up/down hill at much longer ranges.

Old Hunter
06-25-2012, 09:11 AM
Not too difficult to understand...BUT the real challenge is up/down hill at much longer ranges.

True, but I have an answer for that. No long shots. :)

Muleys 24/7
06-25-2012, 04:27 PM
Bullets start dropping the instant they leave the barrel, it has to do with something called gravity!

Yes , gravity works and I understand your point , but it depends how you have your gun sighted in too....shooting on flat ground with the billistics from my .300wby round, the projectile actually go's up slightly till 300 yards....then starts to drop from there on out. The bilistics are on weatherbys site if you care to check it out.

BobT
06-26-2012, 11:09 AM
Line of sight. I assumed you'd know what I was saying? It is the topic.

If that's the case then the arrow "rises" much higher than the bullet.

Just sayin'

Old Hunter
06-26-2012, 01:19 PM
Referring to the 60yds that was being talked about. That's why I quoted it.

Please don't make me explain this post too.