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New_Hunter
07-11-2012, 11:32 PM
Hello,

I have been following the forums for a while and decided to join today in order to ask experienced hunters about a problem I am dealing with.

I recently moved to a different state and I am not a very experienced hunter. I am used to travelling with about 6 people on ATVs and setting up a big hunting camp. I like to bring my wife along although she does not love hunting as much as I do.

The reason I moved was to get a better job. The guys I work with were pretty nice when I first met them and I told them that I was interested in hunting but I was new to the area. They all seemed to like the fact that I was a gun enthusiast and wanted to give me advice about hunting in their state.

I tried to ask a lot of questions and they were very happy to answer me. I asked specifically what to look for when deciding where to hunt. One of the guys showed me an online map of where he hunts and why he chose this location. He said he had hunted there ever since he was a boy and there was a lot of game there and hardly any people. He said that he liked to hunt alone because it was his place where he could have peace. I have never hunted alone and I think it would be strange and dangerous to do so.

A neighbor encouraged me and my wife to put in for a tag where he hunted but we were not get lucky enough to draw. The leftover tags went on sale and we were all able to purchase one. I called 3 of my friends from where I used to live to brag about it and they thought it would be a great excuse to visit me and they were all able to buy tags too. I was so excited. I love a big group and without even trying I had one.

The tags were in a different area than my neighbor usually hunted in so he asked me if I knew anything about the area we had tags for. I said that I didn't so he bought a map and invited me over to look at it with him.

When I saw the map I realized that it was the same place the guy at work had told me about. I showed my neighbor the spot the guy at work had told me about and I pointed out why he told me it would be a good place to hunt. He agreed and we decided we could camp near the spot the guy from work told us about.

I went back to work the next day and was talking to the guys about my hunting trip but instead of being happy for me they all stopped talking to me. I asked one of them why and they said that the other guy showed me the spot so that I could learn what made a good hunting area not so I could hunt the same place that he did.

I don't feel like I did anything wrong. Doesn't everyone have a right to hunt wherever they want to? If it was such a secret why did he tell me about it? I have a lot of people who want to kill something is it fair to let them down?

Thanks!

hardstalk
07-11-2012, 11:40 PM
Thats a tough one and welcome to the forum. In my opinion (imo) he showed you what to look for in a good spot and has spent alot of time researching and making that spot his. Granted its public land and everyone has a right to it most would not find it without putting in time in the field and learning. For you to invite others would upset him because alot of people have lost their "honey holes" in that same fashion. If i were you i would research things such as elevation water sources and feed such as the place he pointed out and spend some time finding and creating your own. Not only would it be respectful. But it will also be more rewarding to yourself to do so.

Jerry
07-12-2012, 12:12 AM
For me personally, I would not hunt on a buddies site unless he asked me to join him! Did you do wrong? Technically no, but having had several spots over run with people in the past I wouldn't be overly thrilled if someone jumped my claim! There is a spot here in Oregon that is so overrun with people that the last time I went there as soon as you entered the woods it felt like you had a target on your back! Opening morning of Elk season my buddy and I had a herd spotted and were moving into position well before daylight and were just about to our designated spots still before legal shooting light when all hell broke loose. There was somewhere around 20 shots fired from different directions. All we could do was hunker down behind a log until the hail of gunfire was over and hightail back out. Granted this is an extreme case but that is one of the problems with hunting in an area where there is another hunter. You never no where they are or how careful they may be in there target selection. There has been more than a few men shot because "they looked like a buck"!!!

quicknick
07-12-2012, 12:13 AM
I agree, man that is a tough one. If it were me I probably wouldn't have pointed out on a map where my honey hole is. Instead I would have told you makes a promising location in that particular area and then let you figure it out. I know it sounds a little territorial but hardstalk is right he may have spent years finding that perfect spot. I don't know what kind of work this is but if there is anything resembling team work there and you want to maintain good working relationships you may want to go scouting and study maps to find another area then let this guy know that you didn't mean any ill will and that you and your buddies will lay off. Like I said it sounds territorial and childish but it might be the right thing to do. Good luck with it, let us know how it turns out.

Drelk
07-12-2012, 12:42 AM
Stay out of your coworkers spot. Find your own. It will be more rewarding and u will enjoy it more whether or not you kill an elk

SHH
07-12-2012, 01:55 AM
I have been reading comments posted on this forum for a while now. However this post hit me hard, because I have seen this very thing happen a couple times. I myself have befriended someone and shown them my honey hole and the next year was invited to hunt my own area. When I said no I was told that maybe I should start hunting a different area.
I agree with all that has been said concerning New Hunters actions. However I don’t think this is a tough one at all, STAY OUT.
New Hunter, don’t betray your co-worker/ friend’s trust. It was a friendly gesture for your co-worker to show you the area and why he or she chose that area, but STAY OUT.
If someone shows you a hunting area and tells you that they love hunting an area and have been hunting the area since they were a boy, they are just being friendly, not asking you to invade and take over their hunting area. If he wanted you there he would have probably invited you to join him.
He said that he liked to hunt alone because it was his place where he could have peace. Do you think he can he have peace with a large hunting party in his camp spot? NO!
Quicknick said “Like I said it sounds territorial and childish but it might be the right thing to do”.
First of all, it is not childish it is a man’s honor and self respect that should make him want to find his own spot. You should not feed off of someone else’s hard work. Who knows, you might find an even better spot if you look. Secondly, it is not “might” be the right thing to do, it would be without a question and no doubt THE right thing to do. STAY OUT.
It takes a weak man New Hunter with no ethics or self respect to knowingly jump someone else’s claim. It is also chicken crap (I wanted t use the other word) and cowardly to not only go hunt the area, but to take an over sized group to join you!!! STAY OUT
I say you need to get off your butt and look for your own area. Don’t piggy back off someone else to look like a hero to your friends.

quicknick
07-12-2012, 03:11 AM
I wanted to say that SHH but I took the more diplomatic approach.

I don't want the OP to feel like a criminal or something. I honestly think he just wasn't aware.

To the OP, just do your homework with your buddies; get out there and scout. Put some miles on your boots and I guarantee when you connect on your animal it will be much more rewarding.

SHH
07-12-2012, 05:22 AM
NewHunter I am not trying to come down hard on you, being new to the hunting world you wouldn’t know the unwritten law of hunting ethics. What I wrote before was addressed to the veteran hunters. Also New Hunter I respect you for doing your home work and asking why your co-worker are upset with you. I hope you choose to start your hunting life respecting animals and other hunters, unlike some other people I could mention, but won’t

BOHNTR
07-12-2012, 08:40 AM
That's why I no longer tell folks specifics about an area. Heck, anymore I don't even share what unit I drew. Been burnt a few times the last couple years trying to help some folks out and asked them to keep it to themselves. Now, there's more people than critters in some of those areas.

To the original poster, it's your call and you have to work there. However, if the person was generous and kind enough to show you what to look for and areas, you may want to return the same kindness and not hunt his spot. Take a bunch of scouting trips and find your own....especially now that you what to look for. JMO

jenbickel
07-12-2012, 09:20 AM
I'm one of those people that has my "spots" where I hunt and I don't mind sharing them and giving hints, tips and advice. Most the spots that I hunt aren't anywhere close to a road and take a lot of work getting in and out of, I feel that if someone is willing to work as hard as I do then they deserve to reap the reward. But in that same sense, I tell people I don't mind if they hunt there. Your co-worker didn't say it was okay and he did talk about loving to go there alone. I too agree that it would be rude to take your large hunting party there. Surely the unit is going to have more than one of the animal you are hunting so go scout it out yourself. Find your own "honey hole." it really will make it more rewarding in the end. Last year while I was elk hunting alone, I was going off a few spots that friends had told me to check out. I ended up finding my own little spot where a couple of bulls liked to hang out and even though I never got a shot, I got close and had them bugling in my face. That to me is successful and I felt proud of myself for finding the spot and it made me feel like I was doing something right as a hunter! If you want some advice for things to look for in trying to find a good spot, let me know! :)

BKC
07-12-2012, 09:27 AM
new hunter, Don't do it. You are just asking for trouble during your hunt and then at work. How could this possibly be any good!

Brocka
07-12-2012, 09:29 AM
I think it would be kind of frowned upon to hunt his spot. I say put the work into finding your own area to call "yours". Otherwise you might have some awkward coffee breaks at work haha!

Colorado Cowboy
07-12-2012, 09:30 AM
When I retired 12 years ago and moved here to SW Colorado, I had hunted some here. I bought lots of maps, did a lot of scouting and hiking in the local mountains. I found some areas that I hunt that are a little out of the main hunting area (eg AWAY from the roads!). I talked to a lot of fellow hunters as I am a member of 2 large shooting clubs. But I do not ask them about their specific hunting areas. If they tell me about them, I usually keep it to myself and once or twice when I hunted their areas, I ask them if it was ok in advance. I have a couple of areas I hunt prairie dogs and geese that are on private property which I also keep close to the vest and don't take many other people to.

Remember one thing...maybe you made a mistake in the eyes of your co-workers, but "lessons learned" should be your mantra.

Old Hunter
07-12-2012, 09:57 AM
A big part of hunting is doing the research and scouting to find places to hunt. Asking someone where to hunt is not hunting.

btw Hunting alone is one of my biggest joys in life.

Doe Nob
07-12-2012, 09:59 AM
A good ole "fuddybuckin". Don't compound the damage you have done already by taking an army into your coworkers spot. Hunt anywhere else in the unit but that particular area. Not sure what kind of work you do, but having a job where people are always trying to throw you under the bus vs. people having your back can make all the difference in the world as to whether you are miserable year round or not. Its not worth a good week of hunting to ruin your relationship with your coworkers for the other 51 weeks of the year. This is not even a question, you have asked, now you know better, don't do it.

BobT
07-12-2012, 10:01 AM
That's why I no longer tell folks specifics about an area. Heck, anymore I don't even share what unit I drew. Been burnt a few times the last couple years trying to help some folks out and asked them to keep it to themselves. Now, there's more people than critters in some of those areas.

To the original poster, it's your call and you have to work there. However, if the person was generous and kind enough to show you what to look for and areas, you may want to return the same kindness and not hunt his spot. Take a bunch of scouting trips and find your own....especially now that you what to look for. JMO

Me too, and I sort of feel guilty about not telling someone what unit I drew.

To the OP, my son in law is a new hunter also, I have sort of taken him under my wing and tried to show him the ropes. I told him if he ever invited anyone else or showed them the places I hunt he would no longer be welcome to hunt with me. He is a workaholic and doesn't do his own scouting but relies on me to do it for him. A couple of years ago he killed a nice buck in a spot that he never would have dreamed of finding on his own and one of the first things he said was "I did it all on my own" I looked him straight in the eye and asked if he found his own spot. Last year I didn't invite him to hunt with me, he didn't kill a deer and he got the point (I hope).

A couple of suggestions, not to sound harsh but IMO you should find your own spot. Nothing wrong with asking for help but have your own map and learn to use it. Spend time scouting, you will get to learn the area and have a better sense of satisfaction. Leave 5 of your buddies at home or if you insist on taking them get far away from anyone else. I hate a noisy camp. Leave the ATVs at home, no hunter wants to hear an ATV engine. My sil suggested ATVs once and I told him to hunt elsewhere if he was too lazy to walk. The only reason to have an ATV on public land is if you have a disability that keeps you from walking. I didn't have a problem with them until they started selling them to idiots with no respect for other people, now I have a big problem. If you must ride an ATV to have fun, go to an ORV area instead. Hunting can be a social sport, nothing wrong with that but have some respect for other people.

Bob

Musket Man
07-12-2012, 10:05 AM
I would never hunt in a friends area without them asking me to join them and I certainly wouldn't invite other people into the area. The guy at work probabally feels that you went behind his back and you are trying to take over his area. You should of ask him about other areas of the unit you could try so you wouldnt interfere with his hunt.

buckbull
07-12-2012, 12:21 PM
Pretty cut and dry, don't take your posse of folks into his area. It would be bad enough if it was just you but bringing a bunch of other guys into the area (who could potential bring other buddies to the area) and your just asking for trouble.

ivorytip
07-12-2012, 12:30 PM
ill share units and sometimes certain areas, anymore there are so many damn hunters out on the easy to get to places that it scares the new hunters away or turns them into lazy hunters, however, ive been in the spot of needing to learn an area and its nice to have a little help narrowing it down, but finding that honey hole inside of an area is what is cool. dyi only goes so far. ive shared one of my honey holes for deer hunting, to my brother no less, the next year 10 of his friends had thiere 5th wheels parked at bottom. i had back packed in several miles above and when i came down a few days later with a buck strapped to my back it really killed the moment seeing my spot was ruined and molested, there were 6 2x2 hanging in a tree, i didnt say a word jumped in truck with my harvest and headed home. honey holes are gold to the avid hunter/outdoorsman, good luck on your hunt and if he is that pissed just say hey buddy im new to this crap then appolagize, sounds corny and lame but trust all of us that have been posting, so worth it. wackem and stack em!

humbletaxi
07-12-2012, 01:40 PM
Find a new spot, he has been hunting there since he was a boy! Being a new hunter I don't think you realize how sacred a spot can be to a person when you spend so much time somewhere. He should have never told you in the first place but in his defense most people have the common sense never to even fathom thinking about dragging a huge crew into someones cherrished spot.

Old Hunter
07-12-2012, 02:27 PM
This won't go over well, but.........

I've never had to ask anybody where to hunt. As I said already. It's part of hunting. Too many now are looking for the easy way.

Yes, I know i'm a grumpy old fart.

Shaun
07-12-2012, 03:21 PM
The risk definatly out weighs the reward here

Timberstalker
07-12-2012, 03:26 PM
I read alot of posts, but I don't speak out very often, this one is one I do have to chime in on. Your co-worker shouldn't have showed you his spot, but he did. He may not have thought at the time you would acctually go there, and I'm sure he didn't think you would bring a big group on buddies along! DO NOT take your buddies there, or tell them where it is. I would only hunt there "if" he invited you. I think everyone who has hunted for a long time has experianced similar situations. I myself only hunt someones spot if they invite me along or its an area that you wait years to draw a tag for and they aren't hunting it that year and don't mind if I do. I have "MY" spots that I hunt. One in particular that I have hunted for over 20 years, its my favorite spot to hunt elk. I have taken very few buddies there, they get discouraged very quickly, so I don't worry too much about them telling everone about it. Believe it or not I've never killed an elk there, but I've had many close calls. I will kill a big bull there someday, and when people ask me where I got it I will tell them the most popular area I can think of! Hunting isn't all about killing something, do yourself a favor and start hunting for a differant place to hunt. Also tell your co-worker your not going to hunt "his" spot.

NoMoreOldNo7
07-12-2012, 03:48 PM
Without duplicating everything that has already been said, how about some advice. Next time you are chatting about hunting with another hunter ask about what areas are the most popular, ask about timing of movement between summer and winter grounds, ask about nearby accompodations. You will probably get most accurate and useful information. If you know the popular spots you already know the places to avoid, knowing a little about movement will give you a better perspective of where you might find animals during the time of your hunt, and of course what accomodations is just good to know info anywhere you hunt. In my eyes that's some good info to have and like I said, you're more apt to get accurate info, just learn to use it to your advantage. Take tha info and find your spot, then keep it to yourself or better yet tell someone else about it and see what happens the next year, Hard way to learn a lesson, but you won't forget it that way. Good luck and don't get discouraged, it takes time to become an experienced hunter and there really isn't too many shortcuts

NoMoreOldNo7
07-12-2012, 03:53 PM
One more thing, don't be concerned about showing your head around here just because you got blasted in this thread. Weither someone admits it or not we were all newbe hunters at one time. Btw, welcome to Eastmans

CrimsonArrow
07-12-2012, 05:11 PM
You should have never shared that info with your friends. Laziness is not a trait shared by successful hunters. That being said, learn from your mistake, and good luck in your future hunts.

BossBrott
07-12-2012, 05:56 PM
Stay out of your coworkers spot. Find your own. It will be more rewarding and u will enjoy it more whether or not you kill an elk

Sounds about right!

Murdy
07-12-2012, 10:43 PM
The fact that you came on here, told everyone exactly what you were planning to do, and asked about it tells me you are a stand up guy and didn't mean any harm. If I were you, I'd go tell my co-worker who had helped me: sorry, wasn't thinking/meant no harm, and we'll find somewhere else in the unit to hunt -- I'm sure there are other spots. He may even give you a little advice on where else to hunt in the unit. Do you have a right to hunt any spot of public land? Sure. But choosing what piece of public land to hunt based on the info he gave you would be a bit of a breach of trust, too, since even if you bought those same tags and he hadn't shared his spot with you, odds are you would not have picked it to hunt on.
Good luck this fall.

tradarch61
07-12-2012, 10:59 PM
I agree with Murdy..the respectful and ethical thing to do is apologize to your coworker and tell him you will look for another place to hunt. However, you do show you have ethical standards by coming on here to get opinions of others. Good luck on your upcoming hunt.

vince
07-13-2012, 06:42 AM
The fact that you came on here, told everyone exactly what you were planning to do, and asked about it tells me you are a stand up guy and didn't mean any harm. If I were you, I'd go tell my co-worker who had helped me: sorry, wasn't thinking/meant no harm, and we'll find somewhere else in the unit to hunt -- I'm sure there are other spots. He may even give you a little advice on where else to hunt in the unit. Do you have a right to hunt any spot of public land? Sure. But choosing what piece of public land to hunt based on the info he gave you would be a bit of a breach of trust, too, since even if you bought those same tags and he hadn't shared his spot with you, odds are you would not have picked it to hunt on.
Good luck this fall.

Good advice here.