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View Full Version : What do you think about a single pin adjustable sight?



velvetfvr
07-14-2012, 08:49 PM
As you can see in my signature I have a 7 pin tommy hogg and a 3 pin tommy hogg for my bows. I was thinking about switching to a single pin hogg fathers for my bows and selling my tommy hoggs. I am wondering whether any of you were in a situation where a multi pin sight would have helped you arrow a animal versuses a single pin? I think it would help me shoot even better but the thought of having a giant at 40 yards and have the single pin set at 20 yards and I can't adjust to shoot him. I see alot of people use single pins but am curious what your guy's take is on them. Thanks again for all your guy's help!

tdub24
07-15-2012, 01:25 PM
I have never used a single pin, but I have watched two buddies miss horribly cause they forgot to adjust their single pin in the heat of the moment. I will stick to my 5 pin.

ivorytip
07-15-2012, 03:52 PM
i cant see myself liking that

nvarcher
07-16-2012, 02:44 PM
Youre fine with the sights you have. You already shoot well enough!

velvetfvr
07-16-2012, 05:30 PM
I will definitely get a new head next year because my pins are getting super close!


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HuntOregon
07-16-2012, 07:47 PM
I switched from a Montana BG to a hha single pin slider. I think the hha is a heck of alot better. For hunting situations you just leave the pin on 30 yards and practice with it there. So 20 your a couple inches high,30 your dead on, 40 a couple inches low and 50 just hold a hair above the back on a elk anyways. It sure is fun though to shoot a 3d course with a single pin slider nothing like turning your sight to a 100 yards and nailing a deer:D

HuskyMusky
07-16-2012, 08:02 PM
I can't stand a 1 pin, and can't understand how others get "confused" by multiple pins, ie I shot him with my 40yd but thought it was my 30yd pin.

It's called focus, and train, and learn it!

a 3 pin would be my minimum, 4/5 preferred.

30, 40, 50yds.

it's pretty simple, range or select the animals distance, ok 40yds, then say 1st pin is 30, 2nd pin is 40...ok use the 2nd pin! done, shoot, dead elk.

tdub24
07-16-2012, 08:06 PM
I can't stand a 1 pin, and can't understand how others get "confused" by multiple pins, ie I shot him with my 40yd but thought it was my 30yd pin.

It's called focus, and train, and learn it!

a 3 pin would be my minimum, 4/5 preferred.

30, 40, 50yds.

it's pretty simple, range or select the animals distance, ok 40yds, then say 1st pin is 30, 2nd pin is 40...ok use the 2nd pin! done, shoot, dead elk.

My thoughts exactly!

velvetfvr
07-16-2012, 08:36 PM
I can't stand a 1 pin, and can't understand how others get "confused" by multiple pins, ie I shot him with my 40yd but thought it was my 30yd pin.

It's called focus, and train, and learn it!

a 3 pin would be my minimum, 4/5 preferred.

30, 40, 50yds.

it's pretty simple, range or select the animals distance, ok 40yds, then say 1st pin is 30, 2nd pin is 40...ok use the 2nd pin! done, shoot, dead elk.

I don't get confused just that I sometimes think I am dead on lungs and are a few inches low. I think I might switch and if I have to just get 3 pin heads for both so then I am good to 40 but am really liking the single pin idea now.


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nvarcher
07-16-2012, 09:54 PM
I thought about a single pin when getting a new sight but opted for a multiple pin slider. Got a single pin head to use for 3 d though! There are benefits to both just figure out what's most important to you.

dhershberger
07-16-2012, 11:26 PM
Just imagine this: You are calling in a bull elk. You call him into 50 yards. You dial in your one pin sight to 50 and then draw back to full draw. Then, suddenly he comes in to 30 yards. What do you do now? You would have to let your draw down, adjust your pin, draw back again, and hope that while doing all of this he won't spook and run for it! There are just way to many what if's and unknowns for me to want to buy a one pin sight. Keep it simple and buy a nice 5 pin sight from spot hogg and you wont be sorry!

HuntOregon
07-17-2012, 12:14 AM
Just imagine this: You are calling in a bull elk. You call him into 50 yards. You dial in your one pin sight to 50 and then draw back to full draw. Then, suddenly he comes in to 30 yards. What do you do now? You would have to let your draw down, adjust your pin, draw back again, and hope that while doing all of this he won't spook and run for it! There are just way to many what if's and unknowns for me to want to buy a one pin sight. Keep it simple and buy a nice 5 pin sight from spot hogg and you wont be sorry!

Then again if you leave your sight set on 30 and practice enough and know where your arrow will hit at 50 and he decides to present a shot at 30 then no worries. Don't knock it till you try it just sayin

CrimsonArrow
07-17-2012, 06:56 AM
The single pin sight is great for stand hunting when the shot is at a fixed, known distance. I don't think they're practical for most western hunting situations. I'd stick with the 5-pin.

RUTTIN
07-17-2012, 07:17 AM
I have a BG Ascent with 3 pins. The first is set at 27yds, that puts me a couple of inches high at 20, and a couple inches low at 30. My other 2 pins are set for 40 and 50. I didn't want a sight with a lot of pins to clutter it up. Anything farther than 50 I adjust my sight, if the animal moves closer I can shoot with my other pins. Pic what is right for you and the situation that you will most be in, and practice with it. If you don't like it, change back.

Drhorsepower
07-17-2012, 07:57 AM
It seems alot of folks are going to them these days, I remember watching a hunting show and a guy shot over the back of a bull at 20? Yards... Like way over the back! He added it up to his sight being at 50 yards because he was showing how it worked to a guy in camp that morning and forgot to put it back to his preset yardage he usually keeps it at.

I will be lucky to be in that situation once in my life with a bow, id hate to lose my opportunity to something like that.

dhershberger
07-17-2012, 01:18 PM
Then again if you leave your sight set on 30 and practice enough and know where your arrow will hit at 50 and he decides to present a shot at 30 then no worries. Don't knock it till you try it just sayin

That still has way to many what if's and unknowns for me! When you practice at home at 50 yds., you dial in for 50 yds.! You don't dial in for 30 yds and then shoot at 50 yds so you can try to guess how far the arrow drops! It really is not ethical to shoot at an animal at fifty yards when you sight is dialed in for thirty because there is a good chance that your arrow hits to high or to low and you end up wounding the animal. Eliminate the guess work and get a spot hogg five pin!

ivorytip
07-17-2012, 01:25 PM
sounds like fun for target shooting but to much room for error while hunting, but i havent tried it so who knows

velvetfvr
07-17-2012, 02:13 PM
I am not worried about yardages. I shoot unmarked 3d a bunch and it helps so I can almost take that out of the equation. I really think I will give it a shot because I can always get a 3 pin head for the Hogg father. So far all the animals I got up on last year I could have dialed ranged and had plenty of time. I could careless about killing, I love that adrenaline while your close and you can't shoot. I think I will give it a shot next year and will give feedback.


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Murdy
07-17-2012, 05:43 PM
I got a buddy who uses one and likes it, but I can't see it myself. Something pops up close, you want to minimize movement so as not to spook it, you have your pin on the wrong distance . . . then what? I'd much rather have several reference points to judge that shot.

ChadH
07-17-2012, 11:41 PM
I can't stand a 1 pin, and can't understand how others get "confused" by multiple pins, ie I shot him with my 40yd but thought it was my 30yd pin.

It's called focus, and train, and learn it!

a 3 pin would be my minimum, 4/5 preferred.

30, 40, 50yds.

it's pretty simple, range or select the animals distance, ok 40yds, then say 1st pin is 30, 2nd pin is 40...ok use the 2nd pin! done, shoot, dead elk.

I used to say the EXACT same thing. Then I got OLD. My eyes just don't focus the same as they used to, and it is often hard to make as accurate a shot as I used to be able to do time after time after time. Focusing near (on the pin) and still having a clear picture far, or far and near isn't so easy anymore and the whole process keeps me from concentrating like I used to. I shot a Hogg It Hunter with Hogg wrap for years and love them. This year I switched to the Hogg Father and to be honest I am shooting better than I have in 4-5 years. Shooting 3D and paper great and super confident at out to 80-100 yards which, while I have little use to shoot that far in a hunting situation, typically leads me to complete confidence at tree stand distances and on the ground at 40-50. I've seen a lot of sights and bows come and go in 40+ years of archery, and used to put down all the single pin and pendulum guys, I was an idiot. I am sold on the single pin now.

If you need it, it could very possibly change a lot about how well you shoot. If you want to stick with a multi pin sight, by all means go ahead, you are shooting a great one. Either way, don't let an idiot like I was talk you out of it. Shoot what works for you. One suggestion, if you just want to check it out, try a cheaper HHA or Trophy Ridge or something. If you get the hang of it, step up to the Hogg Father and slap the other one on eBay (or a back up bow, or give it to a kid or something).

HuntOregon
07-18-2012, 04:25 AM
That still has way to many what if's and unknowns for me! When you practice at home at 50 yds., you dial in for 50 yds.! You don't dial in for 30 yds and then shoot at 50 yds so you can try to guess how far the arrow drops! It really is not ethical to shoot at an animal at fifty yards when you sight is dialed in for thirty because there is a good chance that your arrow hits to high or to low and you end up wounding the animal. Eliminate the guess work and get a spot hogg five pin!

I heat what your saying but I don't stand in my backyard shooting a bag at 50 with the pin set at 30. I go shoot 3d 1-2 times a week where I get to shoot at life size bull at 50 yards using the 30 yard pin constantly making kill shots. Not to mention all the other animals with uphill and downhill shots at verying yardages. Practice makes perfect. The guys who haven't shot single pin won't ever get it but your missing out. If you put the time and effort in to learn where your arrow will hit between 20 and 50 yards there's nothing unethical about. Different strokes for different folks

ontarget7
07-18-2012, 06:32 AM
I have used a multi pin my whole life until about 2-3 years ago. Eyes just aren't what they used to be and find myself more accurate with one and to me accuracy is first in my book. I read through a few of these posts and the biggest complaint is having to readjust your sight on something at the last minute. Another is forgetting to dial in your sight at the correct yardage. These are easy to fix and will take some time, it's called knowing your equipment. I'm not going to lie to you, it will take some time to get efficient with a single pin when you make the change but once you do, I doubt you would go back to a multi pin.

8750
07-18-2012, 07:06 AM
I love my MBG Ascent with 3 pins. I have them set at 20, 30, 40 and the 40 is the pin sighted in for the slide. It can be adjusted from 15yds-90yds. If I want to shoot past 90 yds im going to need to get another pin, or reduce the range on the lower end.

love it. best of both worlds

Whisky
07-18-2012, 07:47 AM
I can understand where you advocates for a single pin are coming from. Like everything, practice makes perfect. And the biggest hurdle is getting over your fear of trying something new...

With that said, I'm a chickensh!t. I will stick with what works for me (5 pin sights). Like somebody has said, too many "what ifs" IMO, for me to see any of the benefits of a single pin.

ChadH
07-18-2012, 10:08 AM
I heat what your saying but I don't stand in my backyard shooting a bag at 50 with the pin set at 30. I go shoot 3d 1-2 times a week where I get to shoot at life size bull at 50 yards using the 30 yard pin constantly making kill shots. Not to mention all the other animals with uphill and downhill shots at verying yardages. Practice makes perfect. The guys who haven't shot single pin won't ever get it but your missing out. If you put the time and effort in to learn where your arrow will hit between 20 and 50 yards there's nothing unethical about. Different strokes for different folks

Good post! Anyone who shoots their equipment lots learns how to shoot it well. There was just as much "learning curve" to shooting a multi-pin well it was just long enough ago that most of us have forgotten how hard it was by now and the multi pins are second nature. The same is true with a single pin. It becomes second nature when you put the effort in to shooting it day in and day out.

A couple of additional points for Dhersberger.... if you want a "sure thing" don't be a bow hunter. It is by nature full of "what if's". If you don't like "what if's" FOR SURE never pick up a recurve.

Chad

Rock 2.0
07-18-2012, 11:48 AM
I have never used one, that being said I can't say yes or no. I would definitely try it out though. I am very comfortably with my 6 pin set up right now though, it is so ingrained what pin to shoot at for what distance it might be tough to change.

dhershberger
07-18-2012, 12:01 PM
Good post! Anyone who shoots their equipment lots learns how to shoot it well. There was just as much "learning curve" to shooting a multi-pin well it was just long enough ago that most of us have forgotten how hard it was by now and the multi pins are second nature. The same is true with a single pin. It becomes second nature when you put the effort in to shooting it day in and day out.

A couple of additional points for Dhersberger.... if you want a "sure thing" don't be a bow hunter. It is by nature full of "what if's". If you don't like "what if's" FOR SURE never pick up a recurve.

Chad

You are right Chad H. There are a lot of unknowns and "what if's" in bowhunting but I like to try to to minimize the amount of what if's and unknowns as much as possible and I think a five pin sight does that much better than a single pin sight. Sometimes shots happen very quickly in bowhunting and I want to be able to draw, pick a pin, and shoot rather than have to adjust my sight right at the moment of truth. I know that there is no "sure thing" in bowhunting but having the right gear can really multiply your odds for success! Minimizing your amount of unknowns and what if's in bowhunting is very important. I'm not being confrontational, I'm just stating my opinion.

BobcatJerry
07-18-2012, 09:26 PM
I shoot a single pin, and don't like the clutter of the multiple pins, although I only had cheapo multi pin sights when I was younger. I know where to aim with my pin set at 30 yards to cover 10-40 yards. I practice it all the time so if I can't adjust it I am set. I started out shooting recurves with no sights. It's about the same thing. If I have to reach out, beyond 40, I usually have time to make a quick adjustment. I like it, but I am going to look at the newer higher quality multi pin sights. It is a drag if you shoot at 50 yards and forget to set it back to 30. Oops

ivorytip
07-21-2012, 06:20 AM
i watched a guy yesterday,with a single pin, make a 120 yard shot, he hit bout 6 inches low but good god! 120 yards!!!? the dude didnt even use a range finder, he looked at the target, looked at the trees adjusted the sight and the arrow whent airborne. that was neat. then i raised my 70 yard pin way over the back and made myself look stupid. ha not saying the single pin allowed him to shoo tthat far but it was pretty cool how he was able to field guess that far. good thing it was just a target but non the less, cool

jimmyk
07-31-2012, 09:01 PM
I used to have a multiple pin sight (sword) and loved it. Then a pro shop talked me into using a HHA and I have been using it for quite some time now. I've tried going back to a fixed pin sight, but after using the single pin for so long, it is honestly like starting over for me. Yes, you can forget to adjust it to the correct yardage, but you can easily use the wrong pin when looking at 5 different ones that are becoming closer together with today's high speed bows. As ontarget7 mentioned, the bottom line is to shoot what is working for you and most importantly, know your equipment.