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twp1224
03-17-2011, 02:15 PM
565
Does anyone have a breakdown of the items they pack into the backcountry? I'm looking to reduce my weight of approximately 30lbs. I dont have s scale, so i use the manufactures specs. Looking for the item and weight. Here is what i have. Would love to see someone from Eastman's list.

BigSurArcher
03-17-2011, 03:30 PM
Bow, arrows, release and broadheads only add up to 4 lbs??

Rob P
03-17-2011, 03:47 PM
what's wrong with your list now? I don't really see how you could cut that much further except lighter pack and less water. 30lbs is pretty light already.

twp1224
03-17-2011, 03:55 PM
2009 PSE Bowmadness 3.5lbs. I added anothe .5lb for the other items. It may be 4-4.5lbs.


Bow, arrows, release and broadheads only add up to 4 lbs??

twp1224
03-17-2011, 03:57 PM
I'm just looking for imput to see if there is anything someone else is using that may replace one or two of my items to get the pack weight down a little. Thanks


what's wrong with your list now? I don't really see how you could cut that much further except lighter pack and less water. 30lbs is pretty light already.

Rob P
03-17-2011, 06:03 PM
you could go with the thermarest z-lite, but you'll give up some comfort

mcseal2
03-17-2011, 06:29 PM
I recently bought the same pack and really like it. have been doing 3 mile conditioning walks through the hills with 45lbs in it every other night and it handles the weight really well. That said, you could drop some weight there. I like the J34 better than many of the lighter packs because it gives you the option of packing meat to camp right away, and out with camp sometimes. If you don't plan to do that you could drop 3-3.5lb by going to a lighter soft pack.

I think your list looks good, but I'm new to backpacking. My list is currently under construction and heavier than yours, but I'm also trying to trim it down.

*******
03-17-2011, 10:50 PM
My gear list reads real similar to yours. A few different brand names but only one big change. I went away from the tent and footprint and went to a bivy sac. Mine is 1.94lbs and replaces my tent and footprint. I do add a siltarp at 0.51lbs if I'm going for more than 5 days or into the high alpine where I expect bad weather.

CoBackcountry
03-17-2011, 11:24 PM
looks pretty good
i pack in 9 mi and run about 33-34 lbs for 4 days
i dont pack a tent footprint and i only use a 1.5 liter camelback and refill every 2-3 hrs

Firearrow
03-18-2011, 11:21 AM
Look at the badlands sacrifice. You will save a few pounds. Other than that you are not going to loose anything worth weighing. Your pack of 30 pounds is really light. Mine weighed about 46 last year going into the Rubies.

twp1224
03-18-2011, 12:07 PM
Thanks for all the feedback. Greatly appreciated.

mthuntress
03-18-2011, 12:59 PM
I would go with the extra weight before I went with the badlands sacrifice it's to noisey unless you are going to be in all open ground with no trees/brush. Just my thought.

arrowslinger21
03-19-2011, 11:18 AM
I also break my gear out with a postage scale by the tenth of an ounce. Just a few things that I do differently from your list... Like mentioned earlier I also use a bivy instead of a tent, which will cut a couple pounds off. They aren't as nice as having a tent as far as comfort but they do get the job done. I also dont use a sleeping bag liner, but I do not know about your situation with your bag, and I would not recommend cutting it if you are using a less insulated bag. I use a 15 degree bag, and so I do not need a liner. Also with my eberlestock blue widow, I do not pack game bags of any sort. They are nice to have, but they are heavy if you have anything nicer than the really cheap ones, and the cheap ones don't do alot. I carry two black garbage bags to keep my pack a little cleaner if needed, and then I will just simply hand wash my pack when I get home. I use a cheap tarp with my bivy set up and if i need something to keep the meat clean, I will set the meat on the tarp, and then I can throw it away when I get home and get a new one for around 6 dollars at Bi-mart.

arrowslinger21
03-19-2011, 11:21 AM
And i also would not go with the sacrafice. The frame is too weak and light, the fabric isnt waterproof like the eberlestock packs are (which is a huge benefit in the backcountry to keep your gear dry during a rain while hiking) and it is noisy as are many of the badlands packs. Don't cut the weight to go with the sacrafice, its not worth it in my opinion.

RUTTIN
03-19-2011, 01:55 PM
If you want some reference to some pretty good info, look into EHJ issue 108. Guy Eastman has a few lists to head into the backcountry with less than 27lbs. He has lists for gear, clothing, food, shelter, and field care. Great read check it out

twp1224
03-20-2011, 12:47 AM
I thought about getting a bivy, but like the comfort of being able to change in the tent on those cold mornings or in the rain, etc. I read a lot about the bivy vs. tent options, but really enjoy the security of a tent in bad weather. I only carry my bag liner if it's going to get below 30's. Otherwise I leave it home. I carry deer bags to hang the meat in. I usually hunt with a buddy of mine and if one of us gets a deer, we still have to hunt for one more. It may take a few more days and hanging the meat at night to cool and then bagging them up during the day to keep the meat bees and flies away is are only option, unless someone has a better alternative. Thank you for your input and I’m going to look at the bivy options. Any suggestions? OR makes a good one I’ve heard. What do you use and whats the weight?


I also break my gear out with a postage scale by the tenth of an ounce. Just a few things that I do differently from your list... Like mentioned earlier I also use a bivy instead of a tent, which will cut a couple pounds off. They aren't as nice as having a tent as far as comfort but they do get the job done. I also dont use a sleeping bag liner, but I do not know about your situation with your bag, and I would not recommend cutting it if you are using a less insulated bag. I use a 15 degree bag, and so I do not need a liner. Also with my eberlestock blue widow, I do not pack game bags of any sort. They are nice to have, but they are heavy if you have anything nicer than the really cheap ones, and the cheap ones don't do alot. I carry two black garbage bags to keep my pack a little cleaner if needed, and then I will just simply hand wash my pack when I get home. I use a cheap tarp with my bivy set up and if i need something to keep the meat clean, I will set the meat on the tarp, and then I can throw it away when I get home and get a new one for around 6 dollars at Bi-mart.

mcseal2
03-20-2011, 07:44 PM
565
Does anyone have a breakdown of the items they pack into the backcountry? I'm looking to reduce my weight of approximately 30lbs. I dont have s scale, so i use the manufactures specs. Looking for the item and weight. Here is what i have. Would love to see someone from Eastman's list.

How did you attach your list?

arrowslinger21
03-20-2011, 09:05 PM
I thought about getting a bivy, but like the comfort of being able to change in the tent on those cold mornings or in the rain, etc. I read a lot about the bivy vs. tent options, but really enjoy the security of a tent in bad weather. I only carry my bag liner if it's going to get below 30's. Otherwise I leave it home. I carry deer bags to hang the meat in. I usually hunt with a buddy of mine and if one of us gets a deer, we still have to hunt for one more. It may take a few more days and hanging the meat at night to cool and then bagging them up during the day to keep the meat bees and flies away is are only option, unless someone has a better alternative. Thank you for your input and I’m going to look at the bivy options. Any suggestions? OR makes a good one I’ve heard. What do you use and whats the weight?

Yeah the tent part is really nice for bad weather, and I agree that they are much more comfortable. The benefits I guess are the lightweight factor, and the higher freedom of mobility, but you do sacrifice comfort. I use an Outdoor Research advanced Bivy. Its a little heavier than most at around 2lbs, but it also has small poles that go into the bivy to keep it off of you face and head. Its a great bivy, and its always kept me dry and safe even in snow. I also carry a tarp though, like a little 6x6 to keep my gear underneath if the weather gets bad.
The Sleeping bag liner is good for those times when it gets colder, and it allows you to go lighter when it is warmer, so that is a good setup there. And yes deer bags are very nice to have, and I usually wish that I had some in most cases, but being as I have been hunting solo more often lately, I don't have to hang my meat after I make a kill, so they aren't as necessary as they are in your situation.

arrowslinger21
03-20-2011, 09:07 PM
And I know I emailed my gear list and breakdown to twp1224 earlier, but if anyone else wants to take a look at it, I also posted it online at the link below.

http://kevinunderwoodbowhunting.blogspot.com/2011/03/hunting-gear-by-weight_20.html

twp1224
03-21-2011, 01:50 PM
Yeah the tent part is really nice for bad weather, and I agree that they are much more comfortable. The benefits I guess are the lightweight factor, and the higher freedom of mobility, but you do sacrifice comfort. I use an Outdoor Research advanced Bivy. Its a little heavier than most at around 2lbs, but it also has small poles that go into the bivy to keep it off of you face and head. Its a great bivy, and its always kept me dry and safe even in snow. I also carry a tarp though, like a little 6x6 to keep my gear underneath if the weather gets bad.
The Sleeping bag liner is good for those times when it gets colder, and it allows you to go lighter when it is warmer, so that is a good setup there. And yes deer bags are very nice to have, and I usually wish that I had some in most cases, but being as I have been hunting solo more often lately, I don't have to hang my meat after I make a kill, so they aren't as necessary as they are in your situation.

I don't see the weight difference in carrying a bivy with a tarp versus my tent. Your bivy and tarp come in at 47.7 oz(30.8+17) and my tent, fly, stakes, pole & footprint come in at 37.7 oz. I do agree with you in regards to freedom & mobility. You dont have the setup and take down time I do. I can also take my footprint, fly, stakes and poles when the weather is going to be mild and reduce my weight to 26.6 oz. Thanks for your input. I'm going to updated list, since i purchased a digital scale this weekend and will weigh my gear instead of using the manufactures weight.

arrowslinger21
03-22-2011, 11:00 AM
Yeah check the weight with your scale and you might find a difference. I have found that many items show up heavier on a digital scale than they do on the manufactures weight. And what tent do you have the weighs under 2.5 lbs?

arrowslinger21
03-22-2011, 11:08 AM
NVM I forgot that your gear list was attached here. Your tent is really light, and lighter than most bivys in many regards. The bivy will get you an extra 15-20 degrees of insulation on top of the capability of your bag where as a tent usually will only get you around 5 degrees, but it depends on the tent. Also, If i carried a one man tent, I would still carry a tarp because I use it for putting my gear under, not sleeping under, so if I wasn't able to put all my gear in my tent with me, including my pack, bow, food ect, then I would still take the tarp. I like to be prepared for the worst, and I don't trust the weather forecast, so I take the same gear if its forecasted to be snowing every night for a week, or if it is supposed to be 75 and sunny all week.

twp1224
03-22-2011, 04:16 PM
I have update my gear list with actual weights instead of manufactures weights. I have also included a hunting list and scouting list.
574

elktracker
03-22-2011, 04:35 PM
I have update my gear list with actual weights instead of manufactures weights. I have also included a hunting list and scouting list.
574

Interesting how much some of the gear varied from the manufacturers numbers. I think you forgot to include a pack on your scouting trip list. Thanks for the idea, I have started making a similar list. I think this will really help me cut some pounds and eliminate some items I rarely if ever use.
I see you don't carry a spotting scope, do you ever find yourself wishing you had one or does the country you hunt make one unnecessary? I know I am often surprised at how many more deer and elk I can spot in a big basin after glassing with my binos and then sitting down and really picking it apart with my scope, not to mention the critters I spot that are a few miles off.

arrowslinger21
03-22-2011, 06:47 PM
Interesting how much some of the gear varied from the manufacturers numbers. I think you forgot to include a pack on your scouting trip list. Thanks for the idea, I have started making a similar list. I think this will really help me cut some pounds and eliminate some items I rarely if ever use.
I see you don't carry a spotting scope, do you ever find yourself wishing you had one or does the country you hunt make one unnecessary? I know I am often surprised at how many more deer and elk I can spot in a big basin after glassing with my binos and then sitting down and really picking it apart with my scope, not to mention the critters I spot that are a few miles off.

I would love to have a good spotting scope and I think I could benefit from carrying one. However, I dont have the $$$ for one that is on the upper end of the spectrum, and I would rather save for another year and buy one that I really like as opposed to one to just get me by for now.

twp1224
03-22-2011, 08:48 PM
Interesting how much some of the gear varied from the manufacturers numbers. I think you forgot to include a pack on your scouting trip list. Thanks for the idea, I have started making a similar list. I think this will really help me cut some pounds and eliminate some items I rarely if ever use.
I see you don't carry a spotting scope, do you ever find yourself wishing you had one or does the country you hunt make one unnecessary? I know I am often surprised at how many more deer and elk I can spot in a big basin after glassing with my binos and then sitting down and really picking it apart with my scope, not to mention the critters I spot that are a few miles off.

My go to pack is the Golite Jam for scouting, it should be on the list. It's light and there is no need for my Eberlestock since i wont be carrying any game home with it. I'm glad you found my list useful. Thats one of the reasons i posted it. I dont carry a spotting scope due to the price. I would love to use one, but right now i'm only using my 10x42 binos. I have had situations were a spotting scope could have saved me a lot of walking. I have never used one, but have read a lot about them and it seems you need to spend the big money to get the best. Maybe next year.

twp1224
03-22-2011, 08:49 PM
I would love to have a good spotting scope and I think I could benefit from carrying one. However, I dont have the $$$ for one that is on the upper end of the spectrum, and I would rather save for another year and buy one that I really like as opposed to one to just get me by for now.

I'm in the same boat. I purchased a lot of light weight gear the last two years and have to save up for the spotter. I was looking at the Nikon Fieldscope ED 50. It's still lighter than most and has really good reviews.

elktracker
03-23-2011, 01:20 AM
I'm in the same boat. I purchased a lot of light weight gear the last two years and have to save up for the spotter. I was looking at the Nikon Fieldscope ED 50. It's still lighter than most and has really good reviews.

I looked through an ED 50 last weekend, I was amazed at the clarity. I could see as much or more detail at 30x on the ED 50 as I could on a Vortex Nomad at 40x and even 60x and it was so much brighter it was unreal. I guess it's true, you get what you pay for.

I am in the same boat as well, I don't have a scope of my own right now either but I have used some higher end Nikon and Kowa scopes for work and they are worth the money. This is what I meant by being surprised at seeing more animals through "my" scope in my last post.

I am still debating whether or not to buy a cheaper scope this year and use it until I can afford something high end or to just do without until I can get some good glass. I think even a cheaper scope at 20-60x will reveal a lot more than a pair of 10x binos. Of course the expensive glass really shines at low light and at higher magnifications, not to mention the better eye relief, focus, warranty and over all quality of higher end scopes. Sorry, got way off topic there.

twp1224
03-23-2011, 12:27 PM
I looked through an ED 50 last weekend, I was amazed at the clarity. I could see as much or more detail at 30x on the ED 50 as I could on a Vortex Nomad at 40x and even 60x and it was so much brighter it was unreal. I guess it's true, you get what you pay for.

I am in the same boat as well, I don't have a scope of my own right now either but I have used some higher end Nikon and Kowa scopes for work and they are worth the money. This is what I meant by being surprised at seeing more animals through "my" scope in my last post.

I am still debating whether or not to buy a cheaper scope this year and use it until I can afford something high end or to just do without until I can get some good glass. I think even a cheaper scope at 20-60x will reveal a lot more than a pair of 10x binos. Of course the expensive glass really shines at low light and at higher magnifications, not to mention the better eye relief, focus, warranty and over all quality of higher end scopes. Sorry, got way off topic there.

No problem about getting off topic. I really enjoy hearing from other avid hunters and hearing that the Nikon spotter has the high quality that I'm looking for real helps in my decision making process. Thank you.

Mrelite
04-02-2011, 09:42 AM
twp1224, I am just looking at what direction I want to go with my equipment so I can't help with your original post but I do have a question about your tent. Have you had any regrets that you don't have the 2 person Agnes since there isn't a big difference in weight?
I have been looking at the one person but some years in NM we have a ton of rain and it seems it would be great to have enough room to have your gear in the tent.

Good thread!

twp1224
04-02-2011, 10:33 AM
twp1224, I am just looking at what direction I want to go with my equipment so I can't help with your original post but I do have a question about your tent. Have you had any regrets that you don't have the 2 person Agnes since there isn't a big difference in weight?
I have been looking at the one person but some years in NM we have a ton of rain and it seems it would be great to have enough room to have your gear in the tent.

Good thread!

Mrelite,
I really like the 1 man. I'm 5'-10" and 165lbs and it's a perfect size. I can sit up in it and get dressed or wait out the weather. I have heard some people complain that the 1 man is too small, but I have not found this true. I put all my clothes, food, etc. in the tent with me. The tent tapers from your head to your feet, being larger at the head. The tent is 42" wide at the head. My sleeping pad is 20" wide. This gives me 11" on each side, that tapers down to my feet of course, that i can put items. I leave my pack and bow out of the tent in a black trash bag. I put my boots and stove in the vestibule are, for easy access in the morning. I think it's a great tent. Having a small footprint dimension gives me more options when looking for a bedding site as well. If you’re planning on being in the tent with all your gear for a considerable amount of time while the weather clears, then maybe look at the UL2. Like you said the weight isn't that different between the two.
I hope this answered your question or at least helped a little.

plentycoupe
12-22-2011, 01:37 AM
Only thing I would suggest is a Kifaru KU3700 or 5200. That would cut nearly 4 pounds of weight. A huge savings.
I own the 5200 and have packed 68 pounds in it. Very nice for a 3 pound pack. I am taking mine sheep hunting next year.

TAG bags are a great lightweight game bag as well. Very durable, easily cleaned and ultra light.

Thanks for the thread.

Maxhunter
12-22-2011, 07:34 AM
what's wrong with your list now? I don't really see how you could cut that much further except lighter pack and less water. 30lbs is pretty light already.

I agreed what he said on the pack. The only thing is maybe a Neo Air pad instead of the Big Agnes.

brandenbowhunter
12-29-2011, 07:54 PM
I have to make a better one this off season...I tend to pack the maybe stuff...
Picked up a new jet boil...Goose down jacket..now...findout how to get that new UA raingear...then would be set for light weight.

brandenbowhunter
12-29-2011, 07:55 PM
I like My Mystery Ranch pack...little heavier than the some...but I gain comfort..