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lineman1779
09-02-2012, 07:19 PM
my girlfriend's daughter was just given a savage 303 lever action. and on the barrel it is stamped (patented feb 7 1893. july 25 1893). i have never heard of the 303cal. can any one give me any info on this gun. or what a possible price on this gun we would never sell it. it has an octagon barrel, absolutley no rust, in complete working order, and no scratches. i am really curious and would like to know more about this gun.

thanx for any info

Sawfish
09-07-2012, 01:56 PM
my girlfriend's daughter was just given a savage 303 lever action. and on the barrel it is stamped (patented feb 7 1893. july 25 1893). i have never heard of the 303cal. can any one give me any info on this gun. or what a possible price on this gun we would never sell it. it has an octagon barrel, absolutley no rust, in complete working order, and no scratches. i am really curious and would like to know more about this gun.

thanx for any info

Lineman, this is likely a Savage 1895 rifle chambered for the .303 Savage (not .303 British!). The .303 Savage is slightly more powerful than the 30/30 Winchester, and shoots a 180 gr. bullet in factory loadings. The metal in these old guns is soft compared to their modern brethren, and will not tolerate hot rod reloads without stretching the action. The guns are well made, but do have an Achilles heel, which is the disconnect lever that unlocks the bolt. Do not do a lot of unnecessary working of the lever, or dry firing. Here is a source for additional information. http://savage99.com/. I have an 1899 in 25/35 Winchester, which is another old time caliber for deer. Good luck.

Sawfish

EdD270
10-19-2012, 04:34 PM
I have a Savage 1899 in .303 Savage.
Factory ammo is no longer generally available here in the US, but is a popular cartridge in Scandinavia and Europe, as well as Australia. Sometimes you can find brass for it on MidwayUSA or other such sites.
Reloading dies can sometimes be found from Redding or Lee.
Ammo can be reloaded, using data for a .30-30, best to start light, say 10% reduction, to see what your gun will take. They generally like heavier bullets, the original factory loads were 180 and 190 gr. Factory pressures were higher than for the .30-30 also. You will see some that say the bullets have to be .311, but that's not so. Some factory rounds were loaded with .311 bullets to increase chamber pressures and get more velocity. However the bore is .308 and modern .308 bullets work fine. With the rotary magazine you can even use pointed bullets, but they don't look right in those old guns.
There are several websites and forums devoted to the Savage 99 rifle, and the .303 cartridge, now more collector's items than shooters, but many still shoot them, as do I. A browser search will turn up some good places for info, and reading through posts there will provide others. Lots of fun shooting the old timers, and making ammo for them. Hope she enjoys the treasure she was given.

Edelweiss
10-21-2012, 02:57 AM
Savage 99 is a wonderful rifle, and the 303 is a wonderful cartridge for a kid to learn to hunt with.

I think if every new hunter had a classic rifle like the Savage 99 or Browning BLR when they started out the world would be a better place.

Dr Wayne van Zwoll had a really wonderful article in one of the last 3 or 4 issues of Fair Chase about the rifles.

I owned a model 99 in 284, for some dumb reason I sold it for a song. It was a deluxe model, and almost new in the box.

Edelweiss
10-21-2012, 02:59 AM
Factory octagonal barrel in 303, rare bird! Going to be expensive, $750-1750 depending on condition. Might be a rare enough animal that $5000 is closer.

Colorado Cowboy
10-21-2012, 07:03 AM
Unless you really need to, I wouldn't shoot it much. It is a rare, classic that has survived in primo condition. I have a couple of guns (a Win M12 that was my Grandfathers and a Colt..39 that was my Uncles) like this in similiar condition. They are really worth too much to use them a lot. Look at them, fondle them and shoot the only occasionally. Treat them like the classis thay are!

The current Blue Book of Gun Values has a 1899B rifle (B rifle has a full octogon bbl) at $1,200 down to $500...depending on condition.

Edelweiss
10-21-2012, 07:20 AM
Unless you really need to, I wouldn't shoot it much. It is a rare, classic that has survived in primo condition. I have a couple of guns (a Win M12 that was my Grandfathers and a Colt..39 that was my Uncles) like this in similiar condition. They are really worth too much to use them a lot. Look at them, fondle them and shoot the only occasionally. Treat them like the classis thay are!

The current Blue Book of Gun Values has a 1899B rifle (B rifle has a full octogon bbl) at $1,200 down to $500...depending on condition.

Horsesnickle!

Use it, shoot it, enjoy it. If it's not 100% new in the box it's not a premium anyway.

Guns are meant to be used, it's not like they inhereted a Purdey shotgun or a factory engraved winchester 1876.

A gun you never plan on selling might as well be a used one.

Colorado Cowboy
10-21-2012, 07:58 AM
I didn't say don't shoot it!!! I said treat it like the classic it is. 100% NIB really doesn't apply to older, classic firearms. I buy, sell and collect a lot of firearms and if the condition is as described, one like this doesn't show up very often. Especially ones with the full octogon barrels, thats why they are worth more.

Old Hunter
10-21-2012, 09:29 AM
The Savage 99 is a real classic. It's a gun I always wanted, and my gunsmith has a nice one in .243 that I might buy for deer.

I did a fast check on the .303 ammo, and it seems to still be available. Here's one example.

http://www.grafs.com/retail/catalog/category/categoryId/224?

Bitterroot Bulls
10-21-2012, 10:00 AM
I wouldn't shoot it much, myself. That is a rare find.

A 99 in .284? That is awesome. Those will go for a pretty penny as well.

Edelweiss
10-21-2012, 02:41 PM
The problem with using guns or treating guns as an investment is that they are a horrible one. If you through $1000 in a metal box and buried it in the sand for 5 years you would still have $1000.

If you spent $1000 on a firearm ($1000 isn't very much, just proving a point) and put it someplace safe, rust free and never touched it for that same 5 years it maybe worth $1000, it might be worth $500 or it might be worth $1300. If it sold well, then Winchester or Remington or whoever will have flooded the market with them and it will be worthless. If it didn't sell well, but was an interesting caliber hopefully you will get your money back.

I beleive the market shifts a lot, there was a time when you buy a 2nd hand post 64 M94 in 30-30 $200-250 any day of the week. And the gunshops were selling new ones for $350. Of course FN shut down the New Haven plant and now any m94 is worth more.

The worst case scenario is the M95 Winchester. My whole life I lusted after a M95 in 405 Winchester just like Teddy Roosevelt had, hell I had never even seen one in that caliber. Owned a couple in 30-06 and 30-40 Krag that were built by Browning in Japan, and even owned a 7.62x54R as a war bring-back. The ones that were for sale were $6000, and now they are worth half that as Winchester dumped tons of new 405's into the fray.

Handmade rare guns by big makers are a good investment. $10,000 would have bought any turn of the century English built double rifle
trade gun in 2000. Something like a Army Navy 450/400. Those same guns today are pushing $20,000, and if they are really clean a premium over that. In the 80's that was considered to be an OddBall caliber and you could have gotten the same rifle for $4000. So in this case of English double rifles yes, it's not a bad investment $20,000 in todays market for a $4000 investment in 1985.

If you had $100,000 and bought a Fuchs bolt action double rifle, shipped it to America and never handled it but put it for sale in one of the bigger double rifle sales shops like Hallowell, Beretta of Dallas, Westley Richards or Griffin and Howe it wouldn't move for $50,000 even though it's 3 days old and cost $100,000 to make in Germany. Why? Because they are considered to be an abomination by the gun world. I personally think they are neat, but since it isn't fish nor fowl in the realm that it is a 6 shot double rifle bolt action fed slut, most purist gun snobs don't like them.

Guns are a horrible investment 95% of the time.

I am not saying use and abuse it, but don't be afraid to use it.

Colorado Cowboy
10-21-2012, 03:29 PM
delete message

Old Hunter
10-22-2012, 09:40 AM
Guns were made to shoot. If I buy a gun, and it's rare. I'm shooting it anyway.

I'm also into bamboo fly rods. I know some guys have some rods built by the old masters that have never been fished, or even cast. What a waste! I think the masters who built those rods would be upset to know all the time and love they put into building those rods was going to waste. Guns are no different.

Old Hunter
10-22-2012, 12:56 PM
I just came back from the gunsmith, and bought the Savage 99 in .243. I knew I was going to buy it the minute he took it out of the safe. I should have bought one a long time ago. It has the Monte Carlo stock, and fits me perfect. Bluing is 99%, and the stock has nice figure and finish. Everything it tight and smooth. I got it for $450. Is that a fair price?

It will be my coyote and deer gun. Now I need to go find some info on how to take it apart.

Colorado Cowboy
10-22-2012, 01:20 PM
Blue Book price is $585 down to 300, depending on condition. Sounds to me that you got it for a pretty good price. .243 is reall a great caliber.

You should be able to download the manual from the Savage/Stevens website.

Old Hunter
10-22-2012, 01:24 PM
Thanks. I just found this site. They get some crazy prices for some of them.

http://www.gunsinternational.com/Savage-99-Rifles.cfm?cat_id=356