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beav906
09-24-2012, 09:11 PM
Looking to get a new pistol. Thinking a 40 s&w. Going to use it for packing during archery. I'd like one that has a .22 lr or .17 conversion kit for the rest of the year. Any thoughts?

Drhorsepower
09-24-2012, 09:44 PM
Once you go glock, you'll never go back, I used to hate them until I spent some time behind one. Needless to say I sold my high dollar gun and bought one and love it! Never looked back.

Fink
09-25-2012, 09:14 AM
Kimber 1911.

There's a chance that I'm worlds worst pistol shooter in the history of ever... But I am deadly accurate with my Kimber. Plus, it looks cool, and it's really fun to shoot. You probably won't be converting to a .22 with it though.

Drhorsepower
09-25-2012, 09:41 AM
You can convert a 1911 to .22

Fink
09-25-2012, 12:57 PM
You can convert a 1911 to .22

Well there you have it! Accurate, and convertable.

beav906
09-25-2012, 02:19 PM
Ya id like one but kimber may be a touch out of my price range. I was looking at glock, Beretta Smith and wesson,walther.i like the Springfield xd but can't find a conversion

homegrown
09-25-2012, 06:17 PM
Glock all the way, U cant beat a glock for the money

Fink
09-25-2012, 08:08 PM
Too bad about the conversion for the Springfield, I have an xd in 9mm, and really like it. I don't think you could go wrong with the glock. They seem fairly similar to the xd.

Colorado Cowboy
09-25-2012, 08:33 PM
What you buy really should be dictated by what you intend on using it for. Concealed carry, target or just plinking for fun. I personally don't really care for Glocks, but they are the pistol of choice for a lot of law enforcement. I shoot a lot of Bulls Eye target and use a HiStandard & S & W. My carry gun is a KelTec. In my Cowboy Shooting I use Ruger Vaqueros.

mcseal2
09-26-2012, 07:36 AM
The gun I carry outdoors when not packing a rifle is a S&W Model 60 Pro Series 5 shot 357 revolver. It rides great on the hip and is out of the way. When I carry it where I pack my Leatherman when working I don't even notice it's there. May not be what you want, but 38's are pretty reasonable for plinking and the 357 has some great heavy loads for carry in the backcountry. It fits my use and points and shoots real well for me. I catfish in some remote areas where I've seen mountain lion, and where the druggies put meth labs and marijuana fields so I like to have it along. Only thing I've used it on other than small game was a sick raccoon, not sure if he had distemper or rabies so I shot him and burned him to be safe.

Chippy Hacky
09-26-2012, 08:14 AM
If you don't want to go the 1911 route then a Glock is probably going to be your best bet. You should be able to poke around and find a police trade at a pawn shop or somewhere for around $350 or less. Don't be shy of a police trade in, they don't get shot all that much. USPSA shooters routinely fire 40-50k through their Glocks with little maintenance. My wife shoots one in competition and she has at least a good 15k through hers, no problem.

If you end up looking at a 1911, I would suggest staying with a .45 as .40 in a 1911 can be quite finicky. If you do go .40, be prepared to get some work done on it. Also if you go .40, take a look at STI, they make the best out of the box .40’s. Buy some 10mm singlestack mags and be ready to send it in to someone like Virgil Tripp to get it running.

I have a 1911 with a .22 conversion, it works very well and is a lot of fun to shoot. It only takes a minute or so to convert. The conversion (Kimber) is very, very accurate out to 50 yards. I can routinely hit 4” plates at 50 yards with it.

Jerry
09-26-2012, 05:44 PM
I'm with CC about Glock, don't really care for them. For me a revolver is the way to go for carry. Never have to worry about jams with a wheel gun. I like the 44 mag for knock down power but most of the time I carry a Ruger GP100 in 357. Have shot literally thousands of rounds through this pistol and it is still as solid as it was new!

Chippy Hacky
09-26-2012, 05:56 PM
He wanted a .22 conversion. Kinda hard to do that with a centerfire revolver. :)

Nothing wrong with a revolver except they are heavy and I don't like to carry them with a pack.

tim
09-27-2012, 07:26 PM
I like my xd

wapiti66
09-27-2012, 07:52 PM
I have a nice shootn smith &wesson m&p .40. I'm not a great pistol shot but I can do well w that one. Also my dad just bought a sig sauer 1911-22. 1911 action in 22 cal., it shoots nice also

beav906
09-28-2012, 03:41 PM
Im really kind of liking the Beretta 92. Anyone have any experience with the conversion or Beretta s

Drhorsepower
09-29-2012, 01:22 AM
I have shot a beretta a lot! Sold it, bought a glock and never looked back, I don't shoot as much as some guys on this thread, but I shoot a lot and I train a lot, beretta would be good to throw on your belt hunting I guess... I couldn't get used to the trigger on second shot, I prefer my trigger pull the same every time, I guess it is all personal preference. If you like the 92, check out the polymer brother, px4, probably a little lighter.

mcseal2
09-29-2012, 06:26 AM
I like a pistol with a hammer rather than a striker fired auto. If I want to use it for small game or other precision shooting the single action is easier for me to make a precise shot with than a long double action trigger pull. I can shoot a Beretta 92 or 1911 better than an XD or Glock, but that's just me personally. I have 2-2.5lb triggers on everything I shoot so that likely contributes to what works for me.

Bitterroot Bulls
09-29-2012, 09:58 AM
Glocks are working guns. They aren't picky on ammo and set the standard for reliability. I have a G22 that has probably near (over?)20,000 rounds through it. Squeeze the trigger and it goes bang.

Drhorsepower
09-29-2012, 01:31 PM
Glocks are working guns. They aren't picky on ammo and set the standard for reliability. I have a G22 that has probably near (over?)20,000 rounds through it. Squeeze the trigger and it goes bang.

Well said, that's exactly why I made the switch.

Sawfish
10-02-2012, 12:22 PM
The gun I carry outdoors when not packing a rifle is a S&W Model 60 Pro Series 5 shot 357 revolver. It rides great on the hip and is out of the way. When I carry it where I pack my Leatherman when working I don't even notice it's there. May not be what you want, but 38's are pretty reasonable for plinking and the 357 has some great heavy loads for carry in the backcountry. It fits my use and points and shoots real well for me. I catfish in some remote areas where I've seen mountain lion, and where the druggies put meth labs and marijuana fields so I like to have it along. Only thing I've used it on other than small game was a sick raccoon, not sure if he had distemper or rabies so I shot him and burned him to be safe.

X2. I had mine Magnaported and added a Pachmayer grip. Makes it a pleasure to shoot, even with the .357 loadings.

bern0134
10-02-2012, 02:22 PM
When I was doing my field work, I carried the Taurus Judge loaded with the .45 LC. It was a bit bulky but at the time it was the only pistol I had. Right know I own a Springfield 1911 A-1, Springfield XDM 9mm and the Judge. Thinkning about getting a Compact Kimber probably in a .40 so I can get my CC.

EdD270
10-19-2012, 05:06 PM
I'm a huge Glock fan, and love the .40 S&W cartridge. Can't go wrong. That is, if you just have to have a semi-auto. I prefer revolvers.
The Springfield XD is a great gun, also, but no conversions available that I know of. Probably will be one day soon.
Really, I think you'll enjoy it as is, and won't need the conversion, unless you plan on doing lots of target shooting and want to same money on ammo. I use mine for small game and javelina, etc. with good success and lots of fun.
The one I carry most, though, is a 3" barrel .357 mag Ruger GP100. Love revolvers.

SansSouci
11-05-2013, 08:07 PM
If you're going to carry a handgun in back country, you might want to first define its potential usage. If you're gong to carry for self-defense for bad guys, I'd go with a good semi-auto of at least .40 caliber. If you're thinking of bear defense, a heavy .357 Mag would be minimum. The reason for a heavy gun is because even .38 Special +P in a model 60 can be hard to retain sight picture due to recoil.

I have a hunting buddy who saw a huge black bear while deer hunting in Utah. He came back to camp saying that he was going to buy a .44 Mag. He hunts with a 7MM Rem Mag. I suggested that if his five rounds of 7MM Rem Mag wouldn't stop a charging bear, I'd reload before I reached for a handgun. He thought about it for a few minutes and said that if 5 7MM Rem Mag rounds wouldn't stop a charging black bear, it's doubtful that a handgun would be much help.

Colorado Cowboy
11-05-2013, 09:46 PM
I used to carry a handgun when I was big game hunting, but pretty much don't anymore. Seems just too damn heavy to carry around now. The only exception is when I'm hunting in grizzly country. I do have a new S & W .50 I carry. Heavy but great stopping power.

tkeslar
11-05-2013, 10:47 PM
I have a glock in 10mm and absolutely love it. I bought a kimber as my first pistol and swore I'd never even consider a glock....till I shot one. The 10mm actually kicks less than any .40 s&w glock I've shot but packs more heat than any .357 mag you'll find...especially if you hand load up to the round's capability. If you don't hand load you can look into the double tap ammo that you can find readily online. It's great for defense against bears, wolves, and even pcp enraged crackheads. Plus the cool thing with this pistol, with a barrel swap you can shoot 9mm, .40 s&w, and .357 sig. Not sure if they make one for .22 but it might be worth looking into.

mcseal2
11-06-2013, 07:30 AM
If you're going to carry a handgun in back country, you might want to first define its potential usage. If you're gong to carry for self-defense for bad guys, I'd go with a good semi-auto of at least .40 caliber. If you're thinking of bear defense, a heavy .357 Mag would be minimum. The reason for a heavy gun is because even .38 Special +P in a model 60 can be hard to retain sight picture due to recoil.

I have a hunting buddy who saw a huge black bear while deer hunting in Utah. He came back to camp saying that he was going to buy a .44 Mag. He hunts with a 7MM Rem Mag. I suggested that if his five rounds of 7MM Rem Mag wouldn't stop a charging bear, I'd reload before I reached for a handgun. He thought about it for a few minutes and said that if 5 7MM Rem Mag rounds wouldn't stop a charging black bear, it's doubtful that a handgun would be much help.

Good point. Except for being available if I had to abandon my rifle to climb something, or otherwise being at hand when the rifle isn't the handgun has no advantage. I don't carry mine when carrying a rifle unless it's just a 22LR or 204. It is a handful with light loads when left stock like mine, it is hard to retain sight picture but so is anything more powerful than a 9mm or 40 in a smaller gun. No free lunch, it's all a trade-off.

Bigsky
11-06-2013, 02:05 PM
I sell firearms for a living and have to say, there are a lot of good reliable guns out there to choose from. Glock, Ruger, Springfield, Sig Sauer, Smith and Wesson, Walther, Steyr, FNH, etc. The Glocks are good guns but they aren't perfect. I don't like how when you grip them they tend to point up and the coating used on the slide must have teflon in it, it is so slippery. That being said if I wanted a 10mm it would probably be the Glock 20. Only ones I would personally stay away from are Hi-Point, Taurus, and the Sig Sauer 250 and Sig Sauer 2022, though their higher end models are very nice. Also I have heard one customer complain about his Kimber rusting in a safe full of other guns, none of which rusted. Prior to hearing it from a customer I had read of some other people's newer Kimbers doing this despite them being well care for and none of their other firearms having rust problems.

Musket Man
11-12-2013, 06:41 PM
I have really been looking at the Remington 1911 lately. That said I prefer to carry a revolver simply because they are very safe and reliable.

shootbrownelk
11-12-2013, 07:43 PM
I have a glock in 10mm and absolutely love it. I bought a kimber as my first pistol and swore I'd never even consider a glock....till I shot one. The 10mm actually kicks less than any .40 s&w glock I've shot but packs more heat than any .357 mag you'll find...especially if you hand load up to the round's capability. If you don't hand load you can look into the double tap ammo that you can find readily online. It's great for defense against bears, wolves, and even pcp enraged crackheads. Plus the cool thing with this pistol, with a barrel swap you can shoot 9mm, .40 s&w, and .357 sig. Not sure if they make one for .22 but it might be worth looking into.

Yeah Tkeslar, the Glock Gen.4 model 20 in 10mm with a 6" barrel. A .41 magnum equivalent in a lighter package.

In God We Trust
11-13-2013, 09:10 PM
My brother and myself both carry S&W .40 Cal M&P's. They are accurate, reliable, and reasonably priced. My next pistol purchase will be S&W as well, great guns.

SansSouci
11-14-2013, 08:01 AM
S&W does make excellent weapons.

I do prefer semi-auto handguns because they're easier for me to remain on target.

I have fired revolvers chambered for cartridges up to .454 Casull. There is no way that I could be accurate with any round after the first with big, magnum revolver cartridges, and that's assuming I could be accurate with the first. I might have fired 2, 3 tops, full-power .454 Casull rounds out of a huge, 7.5" Casull handgun. That thing was not a back-up weapon. That thing was THE weapon. I admire shooters who can fire one accurate round outta that damned thang! A .44 Mag in a lighter handgun ain't a whole lot more pleasant, and produces identical results. I can fire six .357 Magnum rounds quickly and with reasonable accuracy out of an at least 4" barreled, heavy revolver. I could not imagine firing full-power .357 Mag loads out of one of those small & lightweight revolvers, not that there would be appreciable velocity gain over a good .38 Special +P out of a small-barreled revolver.

I'm frequently in black bear country. This year we saw one that was well over 400 pounds. It's hard to fish with shotgun. So a handgun is the only practical weapon. After putting thought in to what would work best for me, I went .45 ACP. As far as an all-around handgun goes, it's very difficult -as I see it- to do better than a 1911A1 chambered for .45 ACP. Like the great '06, the 1911A1 in .45 ACP is better than a hundred years old and, while others have come along since their births, once a wheel rolls improvement is cosmetic.

SansSouci
11-14-2013, 08:15 AM
Let me add this: as I see it, a 4" Model 57 might be the best compromise in a back-country revolver. In all circumstances in which a handgun might become the primary self-defense weapon, follow-up shots are 99% of importance as a first shot. If not a Model 57, then maybe a Model 27 firing full-power 180 grain bullets.

The Casull I fired belonged to a friend who bought it because he wanted a really big handgun. He had no clue what he was buying. In the few times I was with him when he fired it, I never saw him hit anything with it except my chronograph, and by all accounts Casull handguns are among the most accurate. I never saw him fire more than a cylinder-full in one outing. I do believe he sold it.

Colorado Cowboy
11-14-2013, 08:59 AM
I'll begin by saying I am a NRA certified handgun & rifle instructor and a certified Range Safety Officer and have been shooting competition handgun for 50 years. I have seen the progression of handgun calibers to the large ones we can buy off the shelf today. That being said, I do have a .50 S & W and do shoot it fairly regularly. I shoot it well, but realize that I am the exception. A handgun that is to be used for personal protection in bear country needs to be of a large enough caliber to "do the job". But you also must have the confidence and ability to hit your target......more than once if necessary.

There is a lot of research out there that says bear spray is more effective. I also have bear spray. I was required to have it on a guided elk hunt in the Teton Wilderness in Wy a couple of years ago....definately grizzly country. We saw them almost every day. Never having used the spray, I also carried a .44 mag (didn't have the .50 then). My guide also carried both.

I will be spending a couple of months in Alaska and will be carrying a shotgun when I am fishing stream and rivers. I have a "trench" Rem 870 12 ga with a sling that I'll be taking with me. Can't take a handgun as I will be traveling in an RV across Canada, no handguns can be imported or transported across Canada.

The real bottom line is that whatever you choose, practice with it. Become proficient with it, just like you would do with your hunting rifle or bow.

SansSouci
11-14-2013, 10:17 AM
There's a lot of excellent advice in your post. I agree with your 870 choice. Were I to fish in grizzly habitat, I'd want an 870 & slugs. As I see it, a shoulder-fired weapon is best self-defense.

I never carry a handgun while hunting. I do while fishing back country, black bear habitat. I always avoid bears. If they meander into my fishing areas, I leave. I have no interest in killing a bear. I do have a compelling interest in saving my kids' lives.

I do not own a large caliber handgun. As you pointed out in your post, frequent practice is important for proficiency. I do not enjoy shooting large caliber handguns. Heavy recoil ruins fun. I can fire hundreds of .45 ACP rounds all day every day. It's a fun caliber for me to shoot, especially out of a full-size 1911A1.

There are essential factors that I consider when carrying a handgun; i.e., suitability (will it work), reliability, speed to battery, sight picture retention, ease of operation, reloading speed, and portability. Limited to black bears, lion, and bad guys, no other weapon suits these factors for me as well as a 1911A1. It's an easy weapon for me to conceal carry.

Bear spray and pepper spray in general might work, but there are potentially deadly consequences attached to it. First: conditions have to be completely advantageous before using it. It there is slight potential of incapacitating its user; e.g., becoming blinded by it due to wind, I would not want to use it. Pepper spray is effective on 90% of people on which it's used. I know it will drop me to my knees in agony. I've heard bear pray is worse; however, I have read conflicting reports about its efficacy on bears. On my knees in agony would leave me helpless to any attacker, man or beast. The second disadvantage of pepper spray is its effective distance. One surrenders all options to it. Were it to fail, one would assuredly be unable to bring a shoulder weapon/handgun to battery in time to save one's life.

Surrendering a tactical advantage is never wise.