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Work2hunt
03-02-2013, 07:53 AM
Looks like I am going to pack in for a 5-6 day high country deer hunt and will need a new pack. Any thoughts on what to use for a large pack? How about a day pack? I'm 5'11 and about 175-180. Torso (waist to top of shoulder) is about 20inches.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-02-2013, 08:10 AM
I would use one pack for both uses, and I would look into the high end stuff first:

Kifaru
Kuiu
Stone Glacier
Mystery Ranch

You will need somewhere around minimum 4000 CI, with 6000+ being enough room to get your camp and trophy out in one trip.

Work2hunt
03-02-2013, 09:11 AM
Thanks for the tips. Got a specific model or models in mind? Benefit of one vs the other?

Work2hunt
03-02-2013, 10:28 AM
I looked a little bit at the Kifaru packs. $600-700 is a little more than I was hoping to spend. Is there something in the $300 range I can look at that will do the job. I want quality, but I'll probably use the pack about once a year for 5 days or so at a time and I definitely would like it to pack camp and meat if possible and hold a gun.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-02-2013, 11:16 AM
Eberlestock Just One packs aren't as comfortable as the high end stuff I just referenced, but will do the job. I used a J104 for a very similar hunt to yours, and it did well for me, other than serious shoulder pain on the 9.5 mile packout with the meat/camp load.
Eberlestock packs are super-durable.

A traditional backpacking pack like the Arcteryx Bora, or one of REI's bigger packs, might be a good choice, and has a better suspension than the Eberle.

Grantbvfd
03-02-2013, 11:59 AM
I looked a little bit at the Kifaru packs. $600-700 is a little more than I was hoping to spend. Is there something in the $300 range I can look at that will do the job. I want quality, but I'll probably use the pack about once a year for 5 days or so at a time and I definitely would like it to pack camp and meat if possible and hold a gun.

You can keep an eye out on this forum and on other forums for used packs. This is a great way to get gear if just starting out from scratch. You might be able to find a higher end pack a little closer to your price range. High end packs hold their value very well though.

RUTTIN
03-02-2013, 12:18 PM
Work2hunt I am in the same boat as you, I am looking into getting a new pack so I can go for 5-10 days in the back country. I am on a budget also and cannot afford the high end packs, along with all the other gear I want and or need. I looked at the blacks-creek solution with the grip frame, it is built about as good as some of the high end packs, although a little heavy. If you can get to a trade show they have a pretty good deal on them compared to the retail price. A pack you may want to look into in your budget would be the Badlands 4500 on camofire.com when they run them. As for now I am still in search, if I find something I will post it up for ya, good luck in your search.

Work2hunt
03-02-2013, 01:35 PM
Eberlestock Just One packs aren't as comfortable as the high end stuff I just referenced, but will do the job. I used a J104 for a very similar hunt to yours, and it did well for me, other than serious shoulder pain on the 9.5 mile packout with the meat/camp load.
Eberlestock packs are super-durable.

A traditional backpacking pack like the Arcteryx Bora, or one of REI's bigger packs, might be a good choice, and has a better suspension than the Eberle.

Any input on the Eberlestock Dragonfly. I think this is pretty similar to the J104 you mentioned. You said you had shoulder pain. Was this due to the pack couldn't be adjusted to your body or just a poor design on the straps or would the pack not balance right?

Bitterroot Bulls
03-02-2013, 03:00 PM
Any input on the Eberlestock Dragonfly. I think this is pretty similar to the J104 you mentioned. You said you had shoulder pain. Was this due to the pack couldn't be adjusted to your body or just a poor design on the straps or would the pack not balance right?

It was due to the lack of functional load lifters, predominantly.

Otherwise, I really like that pack. The dragonfly is a heavier, more featured version. the J34 is the newest version of my pack.

Work2hunt
03-02-2013, 04:26 PM
Has anyone tried the stone glacier "terminus" the design where you can keep the heavy stuff (animal quarters and such) next to your body seems like a real nice design.

Work2hunt
03-02-2013, 05:38 PM
Any pictures on the kifaru timberline. There website shows the outside but I couldn't really see any detail

BFlores
03-02-2013, 07:30 PM
Try looking at rokslide.com there's a comparison between the two packs and a pretty good video. Hope this helps

Fink
03-02-2013, 08:30 PM
It was due to the lack of functional load lifters, predominantly.

Otherwise, I really like that pack. The dragonfly is a heavier, more featured version. the J34 is the newest version of my pack.

I really like my BlueWidow, but I haven't humped a 100 pound load with it yet.. Its done well with 75 pounds, but like BB says, the load lifters are little bit suspect, I'm afraid it could run into trouble with a BIG load.

Work2hunt
03-03-2013, 09:20 AM
I really like my BlueWidow, but I haven't humped a 100 pound load with it yet.. Its done well with 75 pounds, but like BB says, the load lifters are little bit suspect, I'm afraid it could run into trouble with a BIG load.

How long have you been using your blue widow? Do you use it mostly for archery or just packing stuff? When's look at eberlestock's website they say the dragonfly is more for the gun hunter and the blue widow was the dragon fly designed for an archery hunter. Just wondering....trying to gather all the info I can.

clacklin009
03-03-2013, 10:05 AM
I work with a guy that sells packs, both hunting and hiking, and he recommends the packs like Gregory as the ones to go with when it comes to long trips because they are lighter weight and have better support. They will not have features to carry bows or guns and the waterproofing of some of the hunting packs.

Fink
03-03-2013, 10:42 AM
How long have you been using your blue widow? Do you use it mostly for archery or just packing stuff? When's look at eberlestock's website they say the dragonfly is more for the gun hunter and the blue widow was the dragon fly designed for an archery hunter. Just wondering....trying to gather all the info I can.

I've only got a season on it, about 10 days of hunting, and probably close to 50 days just training with it on. I hiked hills all spring and summer with 60-75 pounds in it, and did a 9 day wilderness hunt with it as well. With the spike duffle, it held everything I needed for 9 days, with room to spare.

I use it for archery hunting, but there's no reason you can't crossover with it. the dragon fly comes with a scabbard, the blue widow doesnt.. When I looked at the dragon fly, I couldn't figure out how a guy could get his gun out of the scabbard without being double jointed though..

Bitterroot Bulls
03-03-2013, 11:07 AM
When I looked at the dragon fly, I couldn't figure out how a guy could get his gun out of the scabbard without being double jointed though..

It is actually really quick and easy. Getting it back in takes some practice.

Bitterroot Bulls
03-03-2013, 11:11 AM
I work with a guy that sells packs, both hunting and hiking, and he recommends the packs like Gregory as the ones to go with when it comes to long trips because they are lighter weight and have better support. They will not have features to carry bows or guns and the waterproofing of some of the hunting packs.

Backpacking packs have really comfortable suspensions ... With backpacking weights. They are not designed with hunting loads in mind. The suspensions on the packs I originally listed give up nothing to high end backpacking packs, and were designed with hunting weights as design goals.

clacklin009
03-03-2013, 08:07 PM
I guess I should have mentioned that I brought up backpacking packs because you can get a Gregory on close-out in the $200-$300 range, most likely better than high end hunting packs, but you give up the over load principle of the later.

U.P. MAN
03-04-2013, 06:33 AM
I'm very new to this game, but have heard alot about the badlands packs. I saw that they werent mentioned in the list of upper end packs?

Bitterroot Bulls
03-04-2013, 06:49 AM
Badlands packs aren't high end. They are decent packs, but more comparable to Eberlestock. And between those, I prefer Eberlestock.

Ridgerunner
03-04-2013, 07:02 AM
I would not hesitate to pick up a used higher quality pack, although it may cost a little more it will be worth it, if not just sell it down the road you'll lose very little money on it

dzlfarmboy
03-04-2013, 04:36 PM
I'm in the same boat as you, just getting started getting into this backpack hunting and I'm giving the J107 Dragonfly a whirl, seems like it will be good for what I want and very versatile in going from small to expand big for all the gear and I really like gun scabbard. Just got mine yesterday.

Darktimber
03-04-2013, 08:56 PM
Check out the Horn Hunter full curl system to. It would be right in your price range and it can pack some serious weight. It is also very modular so you can change it up to your needs. The load lifters on it actually work very well to with lots of room for adjustment. I have packed out plenty of elk on mine and it does good. The one flaw with it is that it does not have an adjustable torso so it either fits you or it doesn't. You can do some mods to them to shorten them up a little but that is about it.

wapiti66
03-04-2013, 09:14 PM
Anybody have experience with the Tenzing packs? Ive been watching them for awhile and tried on their 5000 and 6000 packs this year at an expo. Ive tried on Badlands, Eberlestock, and Tenzing and preferred Tenzing. BUT... I only tried them on, never hunted with them so that only goes so far. Still using the Cabelas Alaskan guide packframe until I can decide which upgrade to make.

Grantbvfd
03-04-2013, 09:20 PM
Anybody have experience with the Tenzing packs? Ive been watching them for awhile and tried on their 5000 and 6000 packs this year at an expo. Ive tried on Badlands, Eberlestock, and Tenzing and preferred Tenzing. BUT... I only tried them on, never hunted with them so that only goes so far. Still using the Cabelas Alaskan guide packframe until I can decide which upgrade to make.

IMHO I would say you wouldn't be upgrading that much if at all from your current setup. The Cabelas packframe is great for what it is and will carry a heavy load better. Save your money and buy a high end pack. Use what you have until then.

wapiti66
03-04-2013, 09:40 PM
IMHO I would say you wouldn't be upgrading that much if at all from your current setup. The Cabelas packframe is great for what it is and will carry a heavy load better. Save your money and buy a high end pack. Use what you have until then.

That's why I've been real patient with the process and am awaiting some real reviews on the tensing... Also keep researching the higher end (kifaru, kuiu, mystery ranch). I don't have any real complaints other than I think I would gain some comfort with the internal packs, and it sticks up pretty high over my head, makes navigating through thicker stuff a little more work.

Work2hunt
07-25-2013, 04:56 PM
So I am a rookie when it comes to 4000+ cu in packs/cargo haulers/meat haulers and what to expect while wearing them. I still haven't picked a pack out, mostly because we decided not to do the trip this year but are planning to next year.

I was able to borrow an Eberlestock dragonfly from a friend of a friend to try out. So I loaded it up today with about 90 lbs worth of dog food and went on a 1 mile walk. My questions for those that use larger packs for hauling camp in and meat and camp out is I felt fine in the back and shoulders, but my hips were pretty sore. Is this typical? Also I really felt like I was leaning forward to compensate for the weight. Will a higher quality pack (kifaru, mystery ranch, stone glacier) allow you to walk more upright or is compensating for the weight by bending forward a given no matter what the pack is?

Bitterroot Bulls
07-25-2013, 06:06 PM
My guess would be you are compensating for the lack of load lifters, and by leaning, you are constantly changing the amounts of pressure on your hips, causing the pain.

I had the exact same problems with my Eberle J104 with really heavy loads like that. I have not had those problems with the SG and Kifaru.

hardstalk
07-25-2013, 07:12 PM
To throw 90 lbs in and go off the bat is a lil extreme imo. If your just trying it out start with say 50lbs and 2 miles it will allow you to pinpoint the pack weaknesses and figure out what you would want in a pack. Walking down the road with a load and spending multiple days afield with a pack are really different circumstances. The packs you mention are high quality, proven load bearing, workhorses. Some of which are actually custom designed for your torso length and waist size. Allowing quality manufacturers to do what they do is a big step financially. The off the shelf packs are really designed to get anyone by. For a large variety of uses. Once you spend some time in the hills with a pack you start to question its design and create your own. Thats where the custom higher dollar packs come into play. They have thought about what you want giving you alot of versatility and making your investment worth it.

Work2hunt
07-25-2013, 07:15 PM
My guess would be you are compensating for the lack of load lifters, and by leaning, you are constantly changing the amounts of pressure on your hips, causing the pain.

I had the exact same problems with my Eberle J104 with really heavy loads like that. I have not had those problems with the SG and Kifaru.

I hear what you are saying. I really like the ability of the dragonfly to zip up and turn into a daypack with the side pockets for scope and tripod. Then when you need to haul out some meat you can unzip it and put some meat into the mesh inside. If you need to add some more room you can zip the duffle bag to the outside.

Does kifaru or stone glacier or any of the others have similar options? Preference to a model between kifaru or stone glacier?

Bitterroot Bulls
07-26-2013, 07:11 AM
The Timberline bags have long side pockets, that are perfect for spotter and tripod. The SG has an integrated meat shelf. The Timberline can also be used as a meat shelf with the frame. However, the Kifaru has accessories like the hanging meat bag that separates the meat from your gear in the packbag.

Both bags compress easily into daypack mode.

I loved my J104, and it packed out plenty of game with me, but the SG and Kifaru are superior packs when it comes to heavy load comfort.

Shaun
07-26-2013, 07:33 AM
I did 18 miles this last weekend in the CA high country getting ready for Alaska and had 80lbs in my Kifaru BT1 thing rides like a cadilliac. I can only compare it to my previous badlands packs though. I know BB did a full blown review between the two packs SG and the Kifaru Highcamp Bikini so he is only one I know that has knowledge between the two

Work2hunt
07-26-2013, 09:09 AM
I did 18 miles this last weekend in the CA high country getting ready for Alaska and had 80lbs in my Kifaru BT1 thing rides like a cadilliac. I can only compare it to my previous badlands packs though. I know BB did a full blown review between the two packs SG and the Kifaru Highcamp Bikini so he is only one I know that has knowledge between the two

BB, or anyone else, know where I can find your video reviews of the packs?

Bitterroot Bulls
07-26-2013, 10:44 AM
PM sent .