PDA

View Full Version : What does everyone do for a living?



Multi-SpeciesHunter
04-08-2013, 06:19 PM
Well I'm getting to that age where I have to start making some decisions..so I need to choose a career. This is very hard for me since it needs to be able to afford my hunting habits and obviously have time for them. Some say I'm crazy for making this a priority. But it is, and always will be. So what do you diehards do for a living? I have been looking at being a lineman and working on power lines, but am not sure. I don't go on luxurious hunts and do mainly DIY and try to spend the least amount as possible. So I don't need to be a doctor or anything. So guys, what do you do?

Caseyu
04-08-2013, 06:26 PM
Firefighter here. Would not do anytging else. Being mostly wildland august archery hunts were tough at first but once you put your time into the career its easy. And my twin is actually a lineman. Its harder for him to take time off than me but once you get set up into an apprenticeship or at least a steady job location you will be in it to win it

N.Y.ArcheryMadMan
04-08-2013, 06:34 PM
I work for a Cable Company and check for Unathorized Services.....

Ikeepitcold
04-08-2013, 06:46 PM
I own a Commercial Refrigeration, Heating and Air Co. I've been in the trade for just over 20 years. Since most of my hunting is from Sept on it haven't been to thought for me. Our work can be fairly seasonal with the fall and spring being our slow time. I've owned my company almost 6 years and it was very tough to get away at all but now with 6 employees with my lead guy very reliable it is very easy now. Look into the trades for sure with the economy on its way back up there should be plenty of work. Linemen make great money but I've heard jobs are a bit difficult to find without a lot of traveling.

mav_7mm
04-08-2013, 07:17 PM
I'm logging to get through school. Hard work and long hours but my boss lets me have whatever time off I want. I'm going to school to be a forester. Keeps me in the woods!!

tdcour
04-08-2013, 07:41 PM
I work in agriculture research. It has its ups and downs, but the pay is pretty decent and I pretty good vacations. The only problem is that I'm planting during spring seasons and harvesting during October (on a usual year). That keeps me out of most rifle seasons, which is why I picked up the stick and string and haven't looked back. The company I work for is called Monsanto, but Pioneer and Syngenta are other companies that do the exact same thing I do. We have locations from California to New York and from Canada to Mexico and actually all over the world so you can move wherever you want as long as there is some agriculture. Not a bad gig that way.

My brother is a deputy for the Sheriff department in NW New Mexico and can typically take off a little easier around hunting season than I can, but he also has to dodge bullets and break up fights which doesn't interest me much. My opinion is that you find a career that you will enjoy. If you enjoy your career, you will work harder at it, move up, make a name for yourself, and as IKC pointed out... eventually you will get out easier. No matter where you start off, you will most likely be last in line to take vacation for a few years so just concentrate on the career and hunt when you can.

Old Hunter
04-08-2013, 07:45 PM
I'm a retired truck driver. I made good money at it, and always had enough time off to go hunting.

hoshour
04-08-2013, 07:56 PM
I manage people's investments for them for an annual fee (no commissions or product sales). I also do consulting on improving company retirement plans.

Working for myself means I have a lot of flexibility with my days off. Plus, when I travel out West to hunt, I take the opportunity to visit my western clients. That way I can write off my travel expenses. That's pretty hard to beat.

hardstalk
04-08-2013, 07:56 PM
Union construction hand. Sprinkler fitter. Pays good. But with any construction trade the job security fails to exist. Ive been playing the game going on 10 years now. Im only 26. Beat up and searching for my passion. Regardless of what you decide. Keep in mind this. Stay away from the rat race as long as possible. Ex. Car payments, mortgages and anything that makes you "have" to work more than you want. Its not how much you make its how much you spend. Most employers understand if you have a passion. And appreciate it. A happy employee is a productive employee. So dont be afraid to announce that at your interviews. Its never hurt me. Sometimes my employers will pay my season off because I bank hours and work hard enough to be appreciated. Which is nice because there has been a couple seasons that without the paid time off I would have to sit around and watch micheal waddel shoot whitetails out of a tree during hunting season. (Yuck!)

Colorado Cowboy
04-08-2013, 08:14 PM
I am a retired aerospace engineer/executive. Spent 40 years in the industry after college. Went to a major southern California University where I played football. Started on the Apollo, then the Saturn SII, on to the B1A, and finally the Space Shuttle. Left Rockwell after 18 years and went to Northrop. F18, F5G, B2 and a lot of "black" secret programs. Retired as manager of Production Endineering after 22 years there. Also spent 2 years in US Army after being drafted in 1963. Ft Sam Houston, Texas when I was in Special Services. Played football & baseball for the 4th Army teams.

I was able to do lots of hunting & fishing while I worked. Also owned (in partnership) a 100 space RV Park in Cabo San Lucas. Kept a boat there and did a lot of fishing and diving there. Retired 13 years ago and moved here to Colorado from Southern California. It was a great career and payed extremely well.

kcaves
04-08-2013, 08:50 PM
coal miner, work half the year plus a months worth of vacation

hvfd21walker
04-08-2013, 08:52 PM
Im a General Contractor. Hunt as much as I want. I also am a firefighter on wildland fires in the summer time. Harstalk has great advice. If you want to hunt more and work less, pay cash for stuff like vehicles and toys.

norcalhunter
04-08-2013, 09:00 PM
Park ranger/firefighter, busy time is Spring and Summer. Lots of vacation time and comp time for hunting.

hardstalk
04-08-2013, 09:05 PM
coal miner, work half the year plus a months worth of vacation

Hows the cardio? Or is it a myth about what them msha folks say about coal miners?

toyhunter
04-08-2013, 09:05 PM
I work on power lines now. I am 26 years old and have since I was 19. I am from Montana and absolutely love hunting and use to sound a lot like you about I put hunting first then everything else behind it.

-----Let me tell you this unless you have an in at the local PUD or utility then go for it but if your planning on doing an apprenticeship through a normal contractor plan on giving up a lot of your life to TRAVELING and working TONS of hours. Yeah the money is great but 80% of the guys I work with are the same unhappy and multiple marriages alcoholics. Its a very tough tough life. You plan on doing all this hunting but then a project comes up and your working round the clock or if your an apprentice your a slave for 4 years never at home. Don't plan on being in a relationship for long unless its town to town yeah sounds fun for awhile chasing women town to town but it all gets old. As a union lineman you basically travel, work a ton, get stuck in bad places often meaning big cities, loose contact with friends family.

packer58
04-08-2013, 09:19 PM
Operating Engineers for 26 years, 15 heavy equipment "finish blade operator", 5 as a site foreman and 4 as a general superintendent all for the same company. After all this the owner retired and dissolved the company. Went to work for another outfit a couple years ago as a working foreman..........2 years from retirement :o It's been a pretty good career, seasonal work has it's perks.

Fink
04-08-2013, 09:39 PM
I underwrite personal lines insurance for a high net worth carrier. I spend a lot of time in the office, but the hours are very flexible, and I get a ton of vacation. It's probably not an ideal job for the outdoor enthusiast, but then, it's 70 degrees every day, and it makes me enjoy my days outdoors even more.
I also own rental properties, it's what I really enjoy, and will eventually build up my holdings to be able to do that full time. That might take a few years though..

Ilovethewest
04-08-2013, 09:53 PM
5393worked for the small town family construction company since 8th grade during summers / winter breaks/spring break. Also waited tables through college. after I got my bachelors, I was an estimator, then an outside sales/project manager for a residental construction supply company for 7 almost 8 years. got sick of construction, so I am currently going back to school for a degree as a Physical Therapist Assistant. 1 more year left. Currently have a 4.0 in school, and my professors think I am doing wonderful in class, so I hope that once I graduate I will find a good job close to home! I work 3rd shift 30-40 hrs a week at an assisted living company for adults with mental handicaps. Watch my kids when I am not working or going to school. wife is a public school special education teacher for the last 10+ years. Hunt and fish as much as my schedule allows (which isnt much) here in Wisconsin. Doing at least 1 hunt out west every fall. Wyoming for mule deer in Region C this fall due to school constraints. Have some elk hunts planned for the future. some other hunts being planned as well. Love the state of wyoming. cant wait to smell the sage this coming october!

buckbull
04-08-2013, 10:10 PM
I'm a software architect working in the aerospace industry. Nice thing about software is there are plenty of jobs out there. I work from home 2 days a week. I've been at it for about 15 years. Like Colorado Cowboy, I get to work on some pretty cool "toys". Good money and I get 4 weeks vacation.

Grantbvfd
04-08-2013, 10:28 PM
Journeyman Lineman. Love my job but it does tend to get in the way of hunting. It's hard work but rewarding. Many long shifts on storm work. Sometimes 120+ hour weeks. Depending on where you work lineman can easily make 200k a year.

Eberle
04-09-2013, 12:08 AM
I was born in the oil boom! Been in the oil & gas buisness my whole life. Started out pumping, pulling units & drilling rigs in high school. After high school, I went to college & got a degree in industrial electronics. I worked for Enogex in college (largest natural gas company in Oklahoma). After graduating from college, I went to work for Phillips 66. After 7 years we merged with Conoco. Spent 13 years with the two of them. I quit 5 years ago & went back to Enogex. I get 5 weeks vacation & 15 paid holidays. The pay & benefits are both good. I also raise cattle, horses, mules & relief pump a couple a days a month. If you don't mind moving to western ND, Hiland Partners are paying well for hands in the oil & gas fields. Plus it gets you closer to Wyoming & Montana (awesome hunting).

Good Luck!

MSUcat61
04-09-2013, 01:51 AM
I'm a med student and I know it'll be worth it eventually but it is seriously hard on the whole hunting thing right now. I had to put in for all points this year because my clinical rotations next year will be crazy busy. Then if I get into the my preferred residency, I'll be moving again and probably to the east coast or California which aren't necessarily on my list of ideal spots to live. It'll be at least eight or more years before I'm back in Big Sky country.

A good read might be "Rich Dad, Poor Dad." You don't necessarily need to take everything in the book literal about becoming uber rich, but it has solid advice about staying out of the rat race of accumulating debts and working to to pay for those debts. It's all about gaining income producing assets that will make you money without your time.

I used to fight wildland fire and the best hunting season I ever had was between undergrad and med school. After working all summer and getting a ton of OT, I spent six weeks in Montana doing nothing but hunting. I shot a six point bull in western MT, a five point buck in eastern MT, and a 14 inch antelope in the Centennial Valley, plus I hunted sage grouse, sharptail grouse, huns, pheasant, ducks, and geese and helped with other successful mule deer and whitetail hunts. It was awesome and plus fighting fire enabled me to hike around in places like Crater Lake, southern Idaho, the Mojave desert, the Arizona Strip, and the Grand Canyon (during the rut too, which was freaking awesome since we had huge bugling bulls running around our spike camp). Running saws and flying in helicopters is pretty cool too, but digging line and making mud for living can get pretty old. Plus really good fire seasons tend to run through September, which kills your archery seasons. Another aside to wildland fire is that you can scout out some new hunting spots while you're on the clock if you do it right.

Shooter
04-09-2013, 02:20 AM
I'm a production supervisor at a glass plant. We make windows and also a few solar panels.

Calbuck
04-09-2013, 07:21 AM
I'm an Electrician in hydroelectric plants. Really good job that pays similar to line worker, but you don't have to be out in the elements. Like someone already said, it can be tough and long hours, but like anything after you put some time in it gets easier to get away once you've got vacation and sick leave.

BKC
04-09-2013, 08:22 AM
I graduated college in 1984 and started working for contractors shortly there after. After about 15 years of doing it for someone else I decided I could do it myself. I have a concrete formwork business and build mostly round structures, underground water tanks, foundations for above ground steel tanks and elevated water tanks. I try to keep it pretty simple and have employees who understand the work, so taking time off is easy. When I take work off to hunt, I don't want any problems, so my goal is to not make money when I take time off, my goal is to not have a problem on the job that would cause my hunt to get interrupted. It is a little tougher to be self employed these days, much easier when I started my business, hopefully that good times are not over. Don't think I could work for someone again. I guess if I had too, I could but being an employee and a employer are much different.

Timberstalker
04-09-2013, 09:33 AM
I am currantly managing a Sand & Gravel operation. I was an excavation field manager till the bottom dropped out of that line of work and the company I work for got out of excavation and paving. I hope someday the market comes back so I can do what I loved doing, but for now I am very happy to still be working for the same company and learnig something differant. Crushing rock and making sand is a lot more technical than I realized! One good thing about the market drop is I can actually take time off work in September now, something that was completely out of the question when things were busy. September was always a big push to get things done so we could pave before the snow flew.

tdub24
04-09-2013, 10:44 AM
Exploration drill supervisor in a huge gold mine corporation which allows me to be in the hills constantly. Get 160hrs of vacation each year and can comp as many days as i would like. Took the whole month of September off last year as well as three weeks around Christmas time for hunting.

wolftalonID
04-09-2013, 11:44 AM
I used to be a contractor for years. Spent a year in a gold mine drilling exploration project and then left for helicopter flight school. Having done alot of things through out my years as a contractor I really appreciate my life skills that will be with me forever. Now that I am flying I am continuing my training and working towards being able to fly fires and or drilling support in a few years time.
I tried to go to flight school in 96 right after HS, and never finished it. The helicopter pilot at the mine I worked at was awesome! He sparked that fire again and I just couldn't put the idea down!
Been flying now just over a year and LOVE it! I am 37 and wish I had only done this sooner. You are on the right track. Find what you love and pursue it with everything you have in you!

Brady
04-09-2013, 12:24 PM
Go to the oilfield! You can work a week or two on then the same amount of time off and get paid a lot where you can afford to go on all these big time hunts!

hardstalk
04-09-2013, 01:47 PM
Go to the oilfield! You can work a week or two on then the same amount of time off and get paid a lot where you can afford to go on all these big time hunts!

Ive got some buddies in wyoming. Week on week off. A dream trophy hunters schedule.

mnhunter
04-09-2013, 02:35 PM
I am an Infantry Officer in the US Army, currently assigned as a Battalion Executive Officer. Other than the occasional forced vacation; we get 30 days of leave a year, and as long as we aren't deployed you can get some decent hunting done.

dirtytough
04-09-2013, 02:46 PM
I work in the oil field and work a 2 on 1 off schedule plus 2 weeks vacation a year. I have never had an easier job physically or mentally. If you want to make good money with a decent amount of time off I would suggest the oil field.

Cons are you work long hours when you are working and its not a great family life.

kcaves
04-09-2013, 03:36 PM
Hows the cardio? Or is it a myth about what them msha folks say about coal miners?

What's the myth???

hardstalk
04-09-2013, 03:46 PM
What's the myth???

The black lung.

kcaves
04-09-2013, 05:38 PM
It's not a myth for underground. I work in an office at a surface mine so it's not bad.

Edelweiss
04-10-2013, 12:23 AM
I am a few months from retiring from the Military, been good but really glad it's over.

humbletaxi
04-10-2013, 06:58 AM
+1 on Operating Engineers, I work in a rock quarry/ asphalt plant. I run a crushing plant, mechanic and weld. Usually not much time off during sept. or oct. but starting about nov. my schedule opens up. I just wish September wasn't so busy.

dustin ray
04-10-2013, 10:02 AM
Have pipe will lay



5418

Backcountry Stalker
04-10-2013, 02:13 PM
I work in the Teamsters Convention Trade Show Industry. Here in Vegas it's a very big industry. Usually I work in the freight dept. Either I'm in a semi or operating a forklift. Pay is good. Politics in it are really less than desirable. But, that's with most jobs. Although I'm college educated, I don't think I would ever take a non-union job. But, that's me and my opinion. I also have my own Trucking-Hotshot business which pays GREAT depending on load or contract.

Doe Nob
04-10-2013, 04:09 PM
I work in commodity trading for a large energy company. If you go the big company office route, typically you start off with 2 weeks vacation, after 5 years you get 3 weeks, after 10 years you get 4 weeks. I take most of my vacation during hunting season and usually get 3 to 4 weeklong trips out west in. I trade power, and the power markets are very seasonal. Lots of volatitlity in the summer and the winter, the shoulder months (spring/fall) things are much more calm and its easier to take time off.
I really enjoy trading, if you are good at it and work for a proprietary shop your income and time off are both unlimited.

My only real complaint is that in the financial side, unless you run your own company, you are pretty much stuck in a big city. In energy that is Houston, Chicago or NYC. That and most of the financial world runs on east coast time, so even if you have your own set up in Denver or some other western city, you still better be up at 4 am daily to keep pace with everyone on the east coast.

Being a lineman, you are going to be working storms a lot. Spring is tornado season, hurricane season is August/Sep/Oct, so very good likelihood you will be working around the clock in the gulf or on the coast somewhere during most hunting seasons. We have a lineman on our duck lease, he gets excited every year about hunting season, then gets slammed and hardly gets to go once some storms hit. He does make enough overtime that he goes sea duck hunting in Alaska to make it up for himself.:cool:

Colorado Cowboy
04-10-2013, 05:20 PM
What a cross section of people!!! Lots of interesting jobs. There are a lot of times I wish I was still envolved in my former work, but it got pretty stressful at times, especially when we had production, cost or quality problems on a new airplane or spacecraft. I had over 100 engineering specialists working for me that I could call on to go find out what was wrong and fix it. Lots of responsibility and stress, but very rewarding too. Thats the part you remember, not the really hard work to get the results .

BossBrott
04-10-2013, 05:38 PM
Fire systems technician. If its a fire alarm, fire sprinkler, fire pump, or fire hydrant, I've got the knowledge and tools to tear it apart and put it back together again. Started 21 years ago as an apprentice, and have worked my way up the ladder, the hard way. I've had some excellent senior experience to lead me the way, and about 10 years ago was cut loose to work on just about any system necessary. Love the job, as every day is a new experience. Receive about 3-4 weeks vacation, which is always spent hunting from oct to feb. The downside is I must live near a large metro area for consistent business, so I commute quite abit, as I'm a country boy that refuses to be a flat lander. Would love to find the same general career in Idaho, or Wyoming.

HuskyMusky
04-10-2013, 06:37 PM
unemployed engineer in IL here.

JEandAsGuide
04-10-2013, 10:10 PM
Operations in a chemical plant. My unit makes chlorine with caustic and hydrogen as by products. Like the shift work for hunting. Can take 2 days of vacation and get a week off. It's sucks for a family man. My kids are 6, 2, and 8mo. and I'm starting to really hate working every other weekend.

digger11
04-10-2013, 10:49 PM
i run a small cemetery.basically a glorified landscaper with some real estate sales tossed in.
I can't complain I shoot a rifle everyday,and my backyard is a huge piece of northern california ag land
that i play in.

Edelweiss
04-11-2013, 04:00 AM
i run a small cemetery.basically a glorified landscaper with some real estate sales tossed in.
I can't complain I shoot a rifle everyday,and my backyard is a huge piece of northern california ag land
that i play in.

So far next to the unemployed guys, your job is the one I want the least.

Thank you for what you do, I am glad someone does it, but it would give me the heebie jeebies.

Edelweiss
04-11-2013, 04:01 AM
What a cross section of people!!! Lots of interesting jobs. There are a lot of times I wish I was still envolved in my former work, but it got pretty stressful at times, especially when we had production, cost or quality problems on a new airplane or spacecraft. I had over 100 engineering specialists working for me that I could call on to go find out what was wrong and fix it. Lots of responsibility and stress, but very rewarding too. Thats the part you remember, not the really hard work to get the results .

I have worked in Naval Aviation for almost 17 of my 20 years. I remember the times when we got crap done and put a plane in the air, especially if it was for something big.

I don't so much remember the BS of doing aircraft business.

Ilovethewest
04-11-2013, 08:44 AM
i thought there would be more medical profession people......but besides me in Physical Therapy world, I only remember 1 other person in the med field on this discussion board. I was kind of suprised by that!

eye in sky
04-11-2013, 08:51 AM
Air traffic controller in Chicago. After 13 years in the Midwest, I get my wish. I'm moving to the Denver area this summer to live closer to where I can enjoy my hobbies more.

Old Hunter
04-11-2013, 09:22 AM
I thought there would be more blue collar workers who work outdoors.

TheWanderer
04-11-2013, 10:36 AM
I'm a resident physician training in emergency medicine. About to finish up my last year of residency. Excited because this next year will be the first time since I before kindergarten that I won't be a student. Got my first western bowhunt planned for September in Colorado.

I chose emergency medicine because of all the crazy interesting stuff but also because its shift work and I get days off in the week to be outdoors when everyone is at work and EM physicians usually work ~14 shifts a month. And there's no call so no one is paging or calling when I'm not working.

Hopefully I get to go on a couple more expensive hunts someday but I need to get rid of some of the student loan debt my wife and I have racked up. I like planning my own hunts and DIY style anyway. They have a greater value to me when I'm responsible for all that goes into it.

CrimsonArrow
04-11-2013, 10:44 AM
i thought there would be more medical profession people......but besides me in Physical Therapy world, I only remember 1 other person in the med field on this discussion board. I was kind of suprised by that!There's a reason for that. All the doctors, dentists, and chiropractors I know work crazy hard because of obligations to their patients. Best of luck in your PT career.
I am a residential building contractor. For the most part I work by myself, using subcontractors when I need the extra help. Been in carpentry for about 18 years. Make a pretty good living. Whenever I take on a job in the fall, I always inform the customer that I may be absent for a month or so. I always put family and hunting before work. I have no ambition to be wealthy. I drive an old,reliable vehicle and live modestly. I usually go on 2-3 out of state hunts every year, and take the family on a Canadian fishing trip for 8-10 days every summer. It's a good life when you don't spend every minute chasing a dollar.

Edelweiss
04-11-2013, 03:20 PM
It's a good life when you don't spend every minute chasing a dollar.

So true, I wanted to use TRUE-DAT! But the little evil elf in the computer wouldn't let me go that short.

BKC
04-11-2013, 08:35 PM
Air traffic controller in Chicago. After 13 years in the Midwest, I get my wish. I'm moving to the Denver area this summer to live closer to where I can enjoy my hobbies more. Eye, You will love Colorado. We have everything to offer the outdoorsman. Your cleared for landing on 35 right.

BKC
04-11-2013, 08:38 PM
I like planning my own hunts and DIY style anyway. They have a greater value to me when I'm responsible for all that goes into it. Greater value is the perfect description !

sheephunter
04-11-2013, 09:05 PM
I work in health care...I work for a small cardiology practice where I do cardiac ultrasound. I like what I do and I make a good salary. I do not EVER want to work in a hospital again, as the politics are horrible, but I'm afraid in the not so distant future everyone who works in health care will work in a hospital or some other large corporate type environment. I'm hoping the practice I work for can survive 7-8 more years and then I can think about retiring. Some good things about working in health care-whether it's winter or summer, I stay warm, or cool, and dry (working outside is great as long as the weather is nice); there are usually not a lot of other people who are interested in the same things we are, so getting time off in the seasons we want is not much of a problem. The best thing I can say about working in health care is there will always be a demand for what we do, but the question in the future is going to be who are we going to be working for and will they pay us a decent salary.

NDHunter
04-11-2013, 10:01 PM
Air traffic controller in Chicago. After 13 years in the Midwest, I get my wish. I'm moving to the Denver area this summer to live closer to where I can enjoy my hobbies more.

Hey man, if you work in the Center I've mostly likely talked to you at some point on the radio. I fly for a regional airline and we are crisscrossing your airspace all the time. One of my biggest regrets is not taking ATC classes while I was in college and becoming a controller....

eye in sky
04-12-2013, 02:35 PM
Hey man, if you work in the Center I've mostly likely talked to you at some point on the radio. I fly for a regional airline and we are crisscrossing your airspace all the time. One of my biggest regrets is not taking ATC classes while I was in college and becoming a controller....

I work Chicago approach. Chances are if you've been to ORD or MDW, we've talked before. Did you go to UND? I work with a lot of people that did.

sjsmallfield
04-12-2013, 06:49 PM
After 10+ years working in contractor sales for the local lumber yard I now manage a retail outdoors shop that my friend opened about threee years ago. I don't know if it will ever make me rich but there is definitely somthing to be said for doing something you enjoy. As long as my family is comfortable I'm more than happy. My friends call it my hobby. :cool:

NDHunter
04-13-2013, 04:52 PM
I work Chicago approach. Chances are if you've been to ORD or MDW, we've talked before. Did you go to UND? I work with a lot of people that did.

I've been into MDW at least a dozen times I'm sure and ORD only once. And yes you are correct, I went to UND.

NDHunter
04-14-2013, 09:59 AM
Well I'm getting to that age where I have to start making some decisions..so I need to choose a career. This is very hard for me since it needs to be able to afford my hunting habits and obviously have time for them. Some say I'm crazy for making this a priority. But it is, and always will be. So what do you diehards do for a living? I have been looking at being a lineman and working on power lines, but am not sure. I don't go on luxurious hunts and do mainly DIY and try to spend the least amount as possible. So I don't need to be a doctor or anything. So guys, what do you do?

One thing I would recommend is to be very conscious of how much, if any, student debt that you will take on. I think people in America are finally realizing that going to a private/prestigious school isn't worth it all the time if you rack up a ton of debt. Community and public schools will be just fine for the majority of professions.

Umpqua Hunter
04-14-2013, 01:00 PM
If a guy has done well in math and science in school, or has the aptitude for it, I always encourage them to look into engineering then working for a PRIVATE company as one of the best opportunities for career and income growth. It usually only takes a four year degree (B.S.), so you won't have the years of post graduate work like a doctor does. There is a high rate of employment, good starting salaries, and if you are with a good company opportunities to move into management.

Umpqua Hunter
04-14-2013, 01:07 PM
Another BIG piece of advice, the money you save towards retirement in your first 15 years working (20-35 years old) if invested well will go much much further than all the money saved in your next 30 years of working (35-65 years old). That is due to compounded interest. It's better to sacrifice a bit on the front end and enjoy the rewards on the back end.

Colorado Cowboy
04-14-2013, 01:31 PM
If a guy has done well in math and science in school, or has the aptitude for it, I always encourage them to look into engineering then working for a PRIVATE company as one of the best opportunities for career and income growth. It usually only takes a four year degree (B.S.), so you won't have the years of post graduate work like a doctor does. There is a high rate of employment, good starting salaries, and if you are with a good company opportunities to move into management.

You are spot on! I have a BS degree in Production Eng and an MBA (which my company paid for). I worked 40 years for 2 private aerospace companies. If you want to work hard and keep going to school while you are working, anything is possible. When I retired 13 years ago I was making around 150K a year. got great benefits and a good retirement.....and it was interesting, fun work. The only downside is I spent a lot of time a different test centers (Edwards, White Sands, Area 51, etc) living in a motel for months at a time. On call a lot and of course the further up in mgmt you get, the more hours you spend working.

BossBrott
04-14-2013, 06:41 PM
Another BIG piece of advice, the money you save towards retirement in your first 15 years working (20-35 years old) if invested well will go much much further than all the money saved in your next 30 years of working (35-65 years old). That is due to compounded interest. It's better to sacrifice a bit on the front end and enjoy the rewards on the back end.

Well said. I just read something real similar today, as it continues, that many folks today do not heed this advice! Therefore, we give "handouts".

Sorry, I'm off topic, ,,,

JMSZ
04-15-2013, 10:16 AM
Well I'm getting to that age where I have to start making some decisions..so I need to choose a career. This is very hard for me since it needs to be able to afford my hunting habits and obviously have time for them. Some say I'm crazy for making this a priority. But it is, and always will be. So what do you diehards do for a living? I have been looking at being a lineman and working on power lines, but am not sure. I don't go on luxurious hunts and do mainly DIY and try to spend the least amount as possible. So I don't need to be a doctor or anything. So guys, what do you do?

Electronics tech for the Navy, working on my electrical engineering degree, and in the Air Force Reserves.

As far as anybody saying you're crazy for making hunting a priority in your life, what do they think that your priority should be?

Colorado Cowboy, I'm right up the road from where you used to work, I deal with your former companies on a regular basis.

Springer
04-15-2013, 12:59 PM
I'm a Stewardship Forester with the Oregon Department of Forestry. Forestry has been good to me over the last 24 years and I've seen and found a lot of neat things over the years. Being very involved in wildland fire managment has made it tough to archery hunt during the month of September. That is the only negative.

WillPower
04-15-2013, 04:21 PM
Vice President - Investments. I have a MBA and a B.S in Enginnering Technology. Was a business development executive prior to entering the financial world in 2007. Some good advice above, getting a technical or engineering degree is a great path forward. I actually got an A.S in Instrumentation Technology before moving on to getting my B.S., then M.B.A. My previous company paid for most of my B.S. and for half of my M.B.A. Get your credentials and work hard, harder than the next guy, bring it everyday and you will do well. The B.S. or B.A. will open the door, hard work and being smart while working hard will take you up the ladder. Working harder than most also works well for me while hunting too !!! Good luck.

WillPower

Elkoholic307
04-15-2013, 08:11 PM
Eye, You will love Colorado. We have everything to offer the outdoorsman.

Like your new gun laws?

BKC
04-15-2013, 08:19 PM
Like your new gun laws?

Elkoholic, I hate our new laws! Checkout this video and pay particular attention to what she says at the end of the video. This women is a complete idiot. Not only is she screwing up Colorado, she is helping draft federal language for the gun laws and was praised Obama for her work.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mxtu228bYFw

buckbull
04-15-2013, 08:56 PM
Like your new gun laws?


Liberal Californian's already screwed up their state so they moved to Colorado to the do the same. Anyone remember the "Go Back to California" signs??

BOHNTR
04-15-2013, 09:27 PM
Are those legislators and politicians in Colorado originally from Kail??? I think not. Don't blame other states for your own problems boys......it's a nationwide mentality now.

hunterman2146
04-15-2013, 09:55 PM
I am an electrician at a soda ash plant in southwestern wyoming. I work shift work and it is great. I only have to work half the month so it leaves alot of time to hunt. The money is great and the time off is even better. If I take my four day shifts off I get 14 days off. so I spend alot of time in the mountains. best job I could ever ask for.

Colorado Cowboy
04-15-2013, 10:08 PM
Liberal Californian's already screwed up their state so they moved to Colorado to the do the same. Anyone remember the "Go Back to California" signs??

Yes...the first one I ever saw was in Oregon in th 70's! Been here in colorado fo 13 years and I'm sure as hell not liberal, so don't blame me and I don't live in Aspen or Boulder!!!

808phreak
04-15-2013, 10:59 PM
Went through a union apprenticeship for operating engineers. Shortly after making journeyman status got laid off due to lack of work. Was unemployed for a little over a year. Which got me and my girlfriend to pick up and move to colorado where her profession in commercial real-estate and property management had a lot of opportunity. I now operate a tigercat for a company that manufactures wood pellets and remediation products for the oil fields. It's not cutting or pushing dirt with a D9 but its work and I get four days a week off. Can't wait for opening day!!!

Old Hunter
04-16-2013, 09:38 AM
Lets not blame all the Californians who moved here. I'm one of them. Not native though. I was born and brought up in Mass.

buckbull
04-16-2013, 12:48 PM
Lets not blame all the Californians who moved here. I'm one of them. Not native though. I was born and brought up in Mass.

I'm not. Just the Liberal ones.

Fink
04-16-2013, 03:56 PM
Another BIG piece of advice, the money you save towards retirement in your first 15 years working (20-35 years old) if invested well will go much much further than all the money saved in your next 30 years of working (35-65 years old). That is due to compounded interest. It's better to sacrifice a bit on the front end and enjoy the rewards on the back end.

Solid, solid, solid advice. Dumping a little bit of cash into your 401K and hoping for the best isn't gonna get it either. We sink so much into investments/retirement savings, that at times, it seems ridiculous. But, I refuse to work for the man past the age of 50.

tim
04-16-2013, 06:24 PM
self employed. own a retail furniture store in north idaho. Thankfully i have some really good employees.

Zim
04-17-2013, 02:07 PM
I am a very independent contract worker for the federal governemnt. I make my own schedule that includes regular travel across IL, WI, northeast MO, & UP of M. This allows me to combine a lot of hunting/fishing trips with my work & get my travel expenses paid for. I feel like I'm semi-retired and that is good because my trailer trash ex never paid one bill of our 3 sons or herself in 20 years, never contributed to one mortgage payment, gas/electric bill, food bill, clothing bill, or anything else. **** tanked her systems analyst career and 4 year bachelor's degree. Gov't threw all my land development money at her. Hid the the $500,000 she stole and now lives off gov't programs at your expense. Oh ya she manipulated and controlled my 3 sons, moved them to TX. The parasite steals her last support payment from me in 3 weeks. The gravy train will end but the horse is out of the barn. So I won't have a real retirement. Other than that it's all good.

tttoadman
04-17-2013, 02:40 PM
I am hitting 45 this year. I am a PM for a moderate sized steel fabricator in Clackamas OR. I can't stress enough the tidbits from Umpqua Hunter. My wife and I of 24 years(I think) had a lot of fun and no kids for the 5 years, and continued spending freely for the next 15. I made lots of OT money and didn't heed the warnings of my Gramma(and others) to "do something with it". I will likely work until I can't. We say it is because we love the work, but let's be honest and say it is because we have to.

Plainsman
04-17-2013, 04:08 PM
Hello Folks! New to the forum, but I have been reading posts for quite some time. This thread struck my interest so I thought I might add to it. I have been fortunate enough to make my living as a wildlife biologist in western SD for the past 3+ years now. I'm certainly not getting rich in this profession but I get to spend every working day on the prairies I grew up on working with private landowners to create or enhance habitat for the benefit of the critters, and it's the most rewarding I have ever done (not to mention all the scouting opportunities)! I get to spend a fair amount of time in the field, however I have been blessed with a loving and understandable wife and 2 wonderful young kids so it's not as much as I had once hoped. My wife and son both hunt and although my daughter is only 3 says she can't wait to go either so I guess life ain't too bad-unless they all share my dreams for dall sheep hunts!

spark
04-17-2013, 05:34 PM
I've retired from the modular manufacturing business. Sort of like building a house indoors. Started out as an electrician, worked my way through all of the line jobs to become assistant production mgr then plant mgr. Learned enough about the trade to start up three plants and close down two different ones. Bought some shares in my last start up and then the company was sold to a Hugh corporation. Made out ok. Always had vacation that I took the kids on and if it wasn't hunting or fishing related, we would go to Disney or a kid themed affair. Always make time for your family, you'll not regret it. They grow up too fast. Now my wife goes with me just about every adventure I'm on. Of course, I'm not as young as I used to be and the boys are not always along to watch over me.
This all came after 12 hrs working for J&L Steel and a few years at the coal tipple, small engine repair, tv repair. Life is truly like a box of chocolates. I've certainly had enough variety in mine

elk_n_esox
04-17-2013, 11:40 PM
I'm half owner of a branch of a small mortgage company... but at one time or another have done almost everything. Been a roofer (til I fell off my second roof), a plumbing and heating apprentice, owned a restaurant and a landscaping company, worked several retail jobs, bartended, cut meat, mason's apprentice (mud rat and brick schlepper) and my favorite job was working in the gym industry for almost 6 years, when I was young, single, and half crazy! (also where I met my wife). When I look back it seems I've had four or five entirely different lives!

beav906
04-18-2013, 12:41 AM
I'm a utility systems operator. We do water distribution, wastewater collection and wastewater treatment for an approx 5000 sewer hookup area. Done a little of everything construction/pipelayinh, rock crushing, logging farming and a free lance cowboy when i get the opportunity. Only thing I love almost as much as hunting is the smell of sweaty horses and cattle

Eberle
04-18-2013, 11:37 AM
Only thing I love almost as much as hunting is the smell of sweaty horses and cattle

I hear you partner, can't imagine life without horses & cattle! Of course when I go out west hunting I take my mules.

MAKAIRA
04-18-2013, 04:33 PM
Twenty plus years running/owning charter boats and finally sold them and doing real estate full time.Fortunatly I still get some fill in captain work that pays for my hunting habit:)without hitting the household income.

BKC
04-18-2013, 05:38 PM
Twenty plus years running/owning charter boats and finally sold them and doing real estate full time.Fortunatly I still get some fill in captain work that pays for my hunting habit:)without hitting the household income.

MAKAIRA, I lived above Sea Cliff beach one winter while I took a year off college. A beautiful place but I never quite caught the ocean bug. Santa Cruz to Gilroy was a nice place to ride my motorcycle. A beautiful place for sunsets.

MAKAIRA
04-18-2013, 05:55 PM
BKC it is a beautiful place for sure!Great fishing in the area for salmon,albacore,white seabass,halibut,and the rockfish but it is tough to find a place to hunt.

dustin ray
04-18-2013, 11:26 PM
Twenty plus years running/owning charter boats and finally sold them and doing real estate full time.Fortunatly I still get some fill in captain work that pays for my hunting habit:)without hitting the household income.
The two best days of owning a boat or boats the day you bought it and the day you sold it.

Colorado Cowboy
04-19-2013, 08:19 AM
The two best days of owning a boat or boats the day you bought it and the day you sold it.

Thats a fact. After owning several boats and fishin the Sea of Cortez and the Pacific from Cabo to Alaska in my own boat, another definition is also appropriate: Definition of a boat is a hole in the water you pour money in! Seriously, had some wonderful adventures in my boat (s) and wouldn't trade the experiences for anything. Still have one, altho much smaller for fishing all the lakes around here and Lake Powell.

OKHUNTER
04-19-2013, 10:53 AM
I work for the federal bureau of prisons, good money, lots of annual leave. Prisons located all over the nation. Good pratice for mma.

ChadH
04-19-2013, 09:41 PM
I am a pastor, I have been planting churches and serving "under resourced" communities for the last 25 years (rural and inner city). Now live in a small logging community in NW Washington.

dustin ray
04-19-2013, 10:12 PM
Thats a fact. After owning several boats and fishin the Sea of Cortez and the Pacific from Cabo to Alaska in my own boat, another definition is also appropriate: Definition of a boat is a hole in the water you pour money in! Seriously, had some wonderful adventures in my boat (s) and wouldn't trade the experiences for anything. Still have one, altho much smaller for fishing all the lakes around here and Lake Powell.

5452
Your vary right heres my hole in the water

packer58
04-19-2013, 10:29 PM
Holey s%&t, that's a big one!!! You could certainly pour a lot of money into that one. My 20' Ranger keeps me busy enough.

Colorado Cowboy
04-20-2013, 08:24 AM
5452
Your vary right heres my hole in the water

I'll post a picture or 2 of the boat I talked about sometime later today.

Old Hunter
04-20-2013, 09:22 AM
I just wade fly fish creeks and rivers. I bet my waders are cheaper that your boats. :)

Ikeepitcold
04-20-2013, 10:03 AM
The two best days of owning a boat or boats the day you bought it and the day you sold it.

BOAT= Bust Out Another Thousand! I agree.

In God We Trust
04-21-2013, 01:03 AM
I am a maintenance supervisor at an underground Molly Mine. I love the mining industry and I love my job. Good pay, 5 weeks of vacation per year, and I only work 15 out of 28 days per month. I have lots of time to hunt and scout.

packmule
04-21-2013, 08:04 AM
BOAT= Bust Out Another Thousand! I agree.

But they're fun if you fish half the week and live on the lake.....of course mine hasn't been used but about 20 times a year since I moved to the concrete.

I worked as a CPI Engineer for a Forest Product company, did a stint in construction during the '05 hurricanes, went back to school and now dabble in oil&gas.

CCMuleyHunter
04-21-2013, 08:36 AM
Outdoor Magazine Publisher-So, like Guy and Ike, I get to hunt and fish for a living. It doesn't suck if anyone wants to know.

I spent 8 years as a U.S. Marine and after that, became a mortgage banker. I just hated wearing a suit and tie all the time as well as being stuck in an office most of the time. The income afforded me the opportunity to go on lots of hunts, but I was unsuccessful because I didn't have time to scout the units out and I wasn't smart enough to hunt the same units year after year. Ten years ago, I walked away from the corporate world and have never looked back. I spend 180 days a year in the field scouting, hunting, fishing, and testing gear.
The majority of folks that I run into in the field doing the same thing are firefighters and contractors. They seem to have tons of time to enjoy the outdoors.
Good luck with your future.

hoshour
04-21-2013, 12:51 PM
If you're frugal, sounds like being a contractor or firefighter is the way to go if you want to have time to be outdoors.

There are a lot of self-employed guys on here too. Plumbers seem to do really well, especially if you can get to the place where you have guys working for you. That's what is really great - having your own business and having guys you trust carry things on when you are away hunting.

First, you have to learn a trade. I went out on my own after six years working for other investment firms. I don't have anyone working for me but my business is pretty portable and doesn't suffer if I take a week off here and there.

Musket Man
04-21-2013, 03:37 PM
I farm and do some mechanic work and welding.

mt-mike
04-21-2013, 04:10 PM
I started out in aero-space with the Navy Department, Point Mugu, California - Headquarters, Pacific Missile Range. However, I made a life style choice and switched to Civil Engineering so that I could essentially live where ever I wanted. Got my degree from San Diego State and sent out applications to work for States of Alaska and Montana. Got offers from both. In July, 1965 my wife and I moved to Helena, Montana where we have lived ever since. I started out as a structural engineer with the Montana, Highway Department where I ended up getting involved with programming bridge design applications to run on the Department’s computer system. Eventually, I became the Administrator of Data Processing for the Highway Department and went on to run the Information Technology Division for the State of Montana for the duration of my career.

After living in Montana for a few years I started doing my own taxidermy work. As time went on I started doing work for other people and became well established as a part time taxidermist, working out of a shop in my basement. This part time business became full time when I eventually retired from the State. After 10-years of full time taxidermy work, I retired completely. Now days I take care of my wife’s horses, fish, hunt and only do taxidermy for myself and family. We live on 40-acres, about 15-miles outside Helena.

AKaviator
04-21-2013, 04:23 PM
I moved to Alaska in 1975 with the Air Force. After the A.F. I spent 20+ years with Alaska Fish and Wildlife, retiring in 2002. I've since flown for a couple different aviation companies doing wildlife survey work and transporting hunters in and out of the field.
I've spent a career working outdoors but always working when I should have been hunting. I was on a first name basis with some fabulous rams and bulls but seldom had the time to pursue them.

swmobrdhunter
04-23-2013, 08:43 PM
im a dairy farmer, owner and operator.

elkmtngear
04-24-2013, 09:20 AM
Nuclear Med Tech....AND President of Elk Mountain Gear

Multi-SpeciesHunter
04-28-2013, 10:15 PM
Wow thanks for all the responses! Sorry I haven't been on the site to reply

tmitch
04-30-2013, 12:21 AM
Multi-SpeciesHunter, you are a wise individual to ask for the opinion of such a wide variety of people. Very impressive group of hunters and outdoorsman. The best advice I can give you is work hard, and try to stay on top of the game financially. In the late 90's I was able to get a BS degree in a touch over 4 years, and walk away with a degree and no debt, and money in the bank. That might be hard to do nowadays, but I think it can still be done. Stay the course, and be prepared to make some sacrifices along the way. Make a goal and stick to it, and you will go far.

I am a Project Manager for a DOE site. I have been there for 14 years. The pay is good, and the benefits are good. I can't say that I love my job, but who really loves to work when they'd rather be hunting or fishing. The job has been good to me, as long as I work hard, treat people right, and have a good attitude. Never stop trying to better yourself from an education standpoint, it is a very competitive world out there. I am also a part-time taxidermist. Fun, but it can get it the way of hunting if your not careful. Good luck.

BOHNTR
04-30-2013, 07:49 AM
I began my law enforcement career over 25 years ago as a game warden in the Golden State. When I discovered I couldn't take time off during the archery season to hunt for myself, I left the agency and lateraled to the second largest Sheriff's Department in the state (5000+ sworn). Been there a long time now and can take up to 12 weeks a year of vacation if I want, which allows quite a bit of archery hunting if desired. Game warden is nice and you're in the field daily, however your "busy" time of the year is when you want to be off as well.....something to think about for those aspiring game wardens.

JMSZ
04-30-2013, 09:50 AM
Multi-species Hunter, I want to jump back in and put in a few extra cents.

If haven't already, go to school - college, trade school, whatever - now. I'm 38, I finally decided what I wanted to do when I grew up a few years ago and now I'm playing catch-up.

You may have exactly the experience that a manager/company wants or even needs, but, they (usually HR) want you to have a degree. Some places don't even care what the degree is in, they just want the degree and they will hire some kid off the street with a degree and no experience before they will hire you with no degree and years of experience.

It makes no sense to me and it drives me up a wall, but it's the way the world works now.

Now that I have a wife, a house, cars, a full-time job plus reserves and now a kid on the way, school is a real PITA. It eats into time for things like hunting and camping.

That said, if you get a degree, get a professional degree, i.e., engineering, chemistry, biology, etc, not one of the basket-weaving type of degrees that are handed out like candy now.

Basket weaving degrees might get you more pay at some places and into a managerial spot at others, but a professional degree will do all that plus open a lot of doors that a basket-weaving degree never will.

An alternative would be some type of trade, where you do an apprenticeship or a formal trade school.

Whatever you do, do it now so that you will have the free time later on.

2rocky
04-30-2013, 01:00 PM
Professional Animal Scientist - I work for a Feed company doing Sales, Formulations, Ingredient purchasing, Software implementation and support, Employee Management, and manage whatever crisis needs addressed.

kesand72
05-05-2013, 04:27 PM
Journeyman Wiremen Ibew 176 Joliet Il. It has its ups n downs but a good career overall. Not as much travel n storm work like linemen, but when work is slow you do what you have to.

Fatrascal
05-09-2013, 09:32 PM
I'm also a Journeyman Wireman Ibew local 177 Jacksonvill, Florida. Been living the last 20 years in Elko, Nevada and working as an electrician maintenance man in a Gold Mine. Good to see one of my brothers on here kesand72. fatrascal.

muleywannabe
05-10-2013, 10:01 AM
I am a VP at a bank. I work hard during the spring and summer and play hard in the fall and winter!

brownbear93
05-14-2013, 08:31 AM
Well I have been in Law Enforcement since the age of 20 now 38 so 18 years already. Wow how time flies! I have worked for a few different depts. but just last year I finally landed a job with the US. Marshal Service (Desk Jockey) which I have always dreamed about and I am enjoying every minute of it. My first love is the outdoors and everything about it though.

Old Hunter
05-14-2013, 09:39 AM
I seem to be the only retired truck driver.

I feel so special.

BobT
05-16-2013, 06:05 PM
I'm 54 and work as a machinist, the money is all right I suppose and I get 4 weeks of vacation a year. The best move I ever made though was staying in the Navy long enough to retire at age 38. The Navy check gives me the financial ability to hunt and fish as much as I want to.

BossBrott
05-16-2013, 08:29 PM
I'm 54 and work as a machinist, the money is all right I suppose and I get 4 weeks of vacation a year. The best move I ever made though was staying in the Navy long enough to retire at age 38. The Navy check gives me the financial ability to hunt and fish as much as I want to.

Good move. Sure wish I had my head screwed on straight in my youth.

Cattleman
05-19-2013, 12:36 AM
I'm a cattle rancher. Owner. Operator. We feed the wildlife for everyone to hunt.

Umpqua Hunter
05-19-2013, 12:52 AM
i'm the 7000th view on this post :)

Old Hunter
05-19-2013, 09:18 AM
i'm the 7000th view on this post :)

Not as good as being the only truck driver. :D

packer58
05-19-2013, 10:25 AM
Not as good as being the only truck driver. :D

Hey Pete, your one-liners and since of humor are classical........I love it !!!! But think about this, you might NOT be the only truck driver on the forum........Just the only one willing to admit it, just food for thought.

Old Hunter
05-19-2013, 11:31 AM
Truck drivers are a proud group, and we didn't have to look at 4 walls all day. :D

Colorado Cowboy
05-19-2013, 12:17 PM
My son owns his own trucking business. He continues to drive and hires others also. Everything is across country driving. He is gone for weeks at a time, lucky he is single. Makes a 6 figure income, but is never home. Lots of job security, but it takes a special person to do it...he has done it for about 12 years.

Old Hunter
05-19-2013, 12:23 PM
I drove line for only one year. I hated it. I drove locally, and had a small company myself. Home every night, and all the time off for hunting that I wanted.

Colorado Cowboy
05-19-2013, 12:53 PM
I drove line for only one year. I hated it. I drove locally, and had a small company myself. Home every night, and all the time off for hunting that I wanted.

Thats the problem as far as I'm concerned. I havn't got to hunt with my son in about 5 years! He is planning on hunting deer with me this year, hope it happens.

cacklercrazy
05-22-2013, 09:26 AM
I pull ta-ta's for a living, I'm a dairyman.

Fink
05-22-2013, 11:24 AM
I pull ta-ta's for a living, I'm a dairyman.

This made me laugh out loud. I should probably get back to work before I have to update my 'what do you do' post to: unemployed.

olderguy
05-22-2013, 12:50 PM
Retired Farm Equipement Dealer, Worked to much, hunted to little, whitetail every year, started elk hunting 2 years ago, no luck yet. haven't fired a shot, maybe this year. I started hunting when we could take our shotgun to school, put it in your locker and hunt as soon as school let out. We would be on national news if we tried that now, what went wrong?

buckbull
05-22-2013, 12:55 PM
I pull ta-ta's for a living, I'm a dairyman.

I pretty much grew up on a dairy farm, grandpa's place and I lived next door. Not a big operation, usually between 30-40 brown swiss cows with anywhere between 20 and 30 heifers. Definitely a tough job to find time to hunt!

wolftalonID
05-22-2013, 11:36 PM
Retired Farm Equipement Dealer, Worked to much, hunted to little, whitetail every year, started elk hunting 2 years ago, no luck yet. haven't fired a shot, maybe this year. I started hunting when we could take our shotgun to school, put it in your locker and hunt as soon as school let out. We would be on national news if we tried that now, what went wrong?

Well they took God out of schools....not like parents take time to fit Him in there much these days and politicians are turning heros into monsters. If they keep it up in two generations no child is going to want to be a soldier, cop, or hunter. Guns are bad right?

25contender
05-24-2013, 01:15 PM
I have been working for myself since 1985. That gives me a little free time during hunting season.:cool:

Kentucky hunter
09-20-2013, 09:30 AM
Diesel Tech at a Ford Dealership been here 14 years working on diesels sense 08 make good money but have alot of time an money invested to get there

kiddwinner
09-20-2013, 09:35 AM
Chemical/Petroleum Engineer! Good time off, benefits and decent pay!

mnhoundman
09-20-2013, 04:11 PM
Septic tank pumper, in lakes country Minnesota. Great if you love to fish. Only wish we had some high country!

11mgrunt
09-20-2013, 06:37 PM
Army opened up doors now with railroad great pay but travel alot but i get to look at spots for hunting

bigmoose
09-21-2013, 11:21 AM
I studied to be a forester and had a job all lined up cruising timber when I got out of college. That didn't work out because of the spotted owl, so I started driving truck. I just kept driving until one day I realized 30 years had gone by. Now I'm still in the seat after 42 years...crazy.

I started out hauling dirt and then got into tankers and even hauled freight for three or four years (Motor Cargo). We lived in Reno and I drove triples for twenty years or so until I got a blood clot in my left arm from resting it on the door...go figure? LOL. Now I drive a little bobtail and I'm in and out of the seat all day making deliveries.

I put in a lot of 12 to 14 days. The pay was okay and we hunted the West every Fall for "big buck". I came home every day or every other day and was not into the long haul stuff. If someone is interested in truck driving, I'd stay away from gas and diesel, too many toxic fumes. I did enjoy hauling propane and even freight.

Okay, Old Hunter, now there's two of us! I just need to retire!

JasonGNV
09-22-2013, 10:30 AM
I work for the state of NV. Highway Maintenance, was a carpenter building custom homes for years until the everything went south. Started working for a directional drilling outfit and made a lot of money, really enjoyed the hard work and ended up running the crew for a few years but traveled all over NV, CA andsome Idaho. Being a single father of a son about to start school made me change it up, plus had no hunting or life drilling. Been with the state a little over a year, took a life changing pay cut but get TONS of time off. Bowhunting is a must now due to school and sports for my boy, winter is my busiest time when snow flys and I'm plowing, get off work and grab hounds and hunt lions. I get to hunt alot now, just gotta work out schedules and make things fit. Its possible no matter what you do, there's hunting somewhere in some season.

Engideer
09-23-2013, 10:24 AM
I am an engineering manager at a utility company. The job itself is only exciting if you are an engineer, but the pay is great and the job is very stable. I will say that having enough money to enjoy life is important, but enjoying the job you go to everyday is equally important. Choose wisely while you are young, and dont be afraid to take a chance and go do something else if you aren't happy.

armyjoe
09-23-2013, 12:14 PM
Military - Army

Iowahunter
09-24-2013, 11:07 PM
Well they took God out of schools....not like parents take time to fit Him in there much these days and politicians are turning heros into monsters. If they keep it up in two generations no child is going to want to be a soldier, cop, or hunter. Guns are bad right?

You're definitely right...have you seen the hypocrisy "poster" floating around? It reads "blaming every gun owner for the deaths of children while supporting abortion". Pretty crazy with how things are flowing right now...hope things start to change in 3 yrs!

Iowahunter
09-24-2013, 11:21 PM
State Trooper....decent pay, great benefits, not in an office(well guess your car is your office), first 4 yrs get 2 weeks paid vaca(not including 11 holidays) so basically 3 1/2 weeks paid, plus comp time to take off. Been on 7 yrs and have worked on average 200days a yr. will be less this yr! Basically can get off whenever...unless you want the next day off and there's a snowstorm forecasted! Banked sick leave. Been great so far and don't see myself switching careers unless it'd be transferring to a different division...ie. narcotics, investigation, fire marshals...

y02MDM
09-25-2013, 12:54 PM
Refinery worker. Pays good, the vacation time gets better the longer you are with the company. I have been here 10 yrs and am up to 4 weeks off. The people you work with are awesome. Just a bunch of guys having fun and making jokes once the work is done. A lineman would be a good job lots of money but I am not sure if they get much time off. All the lineman I know work long hours.

2brassballs
09-25-2013, 03:55 PM
Landscape contractor .

Humblesmith
09-26-2013, 07:54 AM
I don't know if the OP is still asking the question, but for those of you who are interested in a career, the oil field is one very good way to go. The upstream well operators have a starting pay that is well better than average, get to work outside, and have great benefits. Plus, if you work offshore or international, you can live anywhere, and work 2 weeks on/2 weeks off, or 4 weeks on/4 weeks off, and have a huge amount of time off to hunt and fish.

BrettKoenecke
09-26-2013, 02:37 PM
Attorney at law, going on 20 years now. For the first ten years I scratched and clawed to find places to hunt. Through luck and hard work and persistence, I've gotten to the place where I have some time to go hunting but not enough time to accept all the invitations I get from friends and clients.

I represent a number of power companies in the upper midwest. All of them are looking at their existing staff and seeing huge numbers of impending retirements. Meanwhile all of us got Christmas presents which use electricity. Use will continue to go up. Someone has to keep the lights on. Those are good jobs. If you have an interest, I know that there's opportunity out there.

lp2506
09-26-2013, 04:17 PM
HVAC sales and Farmer

NVBird'n'Big
09-27-2013, 12:20 AM
CPA here, couldn't ask for a better job for hunting. Busy time in the spring, slow during archery season in August, busy again Sept until Oct 15 which works perfect because it's right about the start of rifle deer and chukar then it's all smooth sailing and can take as much time off as I want until the end of January. Nobody likes paying taxes (especially to this administration) and doing the books but if you don't do it right the first time it will definitely bite you in the ass later on.

Lazykmcranch
09-27-2013, 01:30 AM
I've been in prison for the last 23+ years................as a correctional officer..(prison guard) .

sleepymoewi
09-27-2013, 11:43 AM
Business Banker/VP with money to lend, pros and cons like any other career. money/benefits/PTO decent, but I review financials of business owners/entrepenuers every day that do much better, but have taken considerable risk.

I think today for a person to succeed has to get a basic education but then also specialize in something. Then, establish some other secondary income generating backup plan. Could be part time cash trade, investment property, consulting, IT or IS work, something. Be disciplined and driven, put that money away and don't get caught up in material things. Work your arse off until 50 and then hopefully you have a base and financial flexibility you can go do what you want and not step backwards

firebeck
09-27-2013, 07:03 PM
I just graduated from respiratory therapy school. Trying to find a job now. I have done construction for 14 years previously and through school. Only got interested in hunting within the last 5 years and haven't had a lot of time or money to spend but always manage to spend some time hunting whenever it works out.

tkeslar
10-01-2013, 08:23 PM
I'm an operator at a chemical plant for the largest hydrocarbon refiner in the US, which also happens to donate a lot of money to outdoors organizations. I'm 29 now and hired in when I was 22. Luckily I get to operate the co-gens which is basically a big turbine that's fired with natural gas to turn a generator and make electricity on one end then uses the exhaust gases to make steam on the opposite side, which we use to power other turbines throughout the plant. The pay is great, the benefits are awesome, and the schedule is about as good as it gets. I work 4 on 4 off shift work meaning I basically only work 6 months a year which provides me with plenty of days off to hunt and fish. Even better, I'm off during the middle of the week when everyone else is at work and I have the whole forest or bay to myself. What's great is I don't even have a degree. In all honesty, I think college is getting to be overrated these days. Degrees are a dime a dozen...do what makes YOU happy and still pays the bills.

Sawfish
10-09-2013, 04:08 PM
I'm an operator at a chemical plant for the largest hydrocarbon refiner in the US, which also happens to donate a lot of money to outdoors organizations. I'm 29 now and hired in when I was 22. Luckily I get to operate the co-gens which is basically a big turbine that's fired with natural gas to turn a generator and make electricity on one end then uses the exhaust gases to make steam on the opposite side, which we use to power other turbines throughout the plant. The pay is great, the benefits are awesome, and the schedule is about as good as it gets. I work 4 on 4 off shift work meaning I basically only work 6 months a year which provides me with plenty of days off to hunt and fish. Even better, I'm off during the middle of the week when everyone else is at work and I have the whole forest or bay to myself. What's great is I don't even have a degree. In all honesty, I think college is getting to be overrated these days. Degrees are a dime a dozen...do what makes YOU happy and still pays the bills.

Being more than twice your age, I have to respectfully disagree with the point re: college degrees. I know things are great for you now, and understand your feelings. However, when the day comes that your company is purchased, merged, downsized, etc., you may find a college degree to be a very handy thing. Employers do not necessarily look to see what you learned (or studied, within reason) in college, but to see that you had the discipline and initiative to complete your studies and get a degree. I have been on both sides of the fence, and this is just the reality of things in the business world.

d.kerri
10-09-2013, 10:58 PM
Youth pastor. Flexible hours, enough vacation and a frugal wife allow me a western DIY trip each year. If I could suggest anything, it'd be to not go cheap on gear. Don't buy a cheap pack, you'll need another one soon, don't buy a cheap tent, it's your only sanctuary when a storm blows in. Don't buy cheap optics- it's a long ways to travel to shoot an animal in the ass.

Hunt hard and define "success" loosely.

marcusvdk
10-11-2013, 12:47 PM
Deli Supervisor at a Grocery Store........Did Cooking in restaurants for 8 years before this. and the best part of it all is i got a finance degree in 2010 and have had no luck with getting a job in that field. Had a some interview a few second interviews but no luck

dying to kill
10-11-2013, 10:02 PM
Farmer/Rancher here , also help my granddad with his farm/ ranch operation. Pick a living that you love and you wont work a day in your life, im not saying its always easy, its not for sure!! But it sure beats a 8-5 making someone elses dreams come true!

tkeslar
10-15-2013, 08:01 PM
Sawfish, I understand and respect your concern. I am 2 classes away from having a BS degree. So if something terrible does happen I can get my degree in about 3 months. As we speak my plant is doubling its size/output in development projects. I really hope nothing happens with my job before I'm ready to retire which I will do at 55. If we do go under, I think this whole country will be in a world of hurt

cbuckla
10-16-2013, 01:12 PM
Im a civil engineer.

Sent from my SPH-L720 using Tapatalk 2

Powerman777
10-16-2013, 02:13 PM
I am a control room operator at a coal fired power plant. Been here 10 years and get 4 weeks vacation and many days off in between. Can't complain I have been very blessed in life.

kensauret
10-16-2013, 07:35 PM
I'm in sales. Look into this as you can make as much money as you want, especially if you are paid on a commission basis. With the right company you produce to numbers they want, earn as much money as you want and take time off whenever you need to. I enjoy the flexibility sales offers.

swampokie
10-17-2013, 11:49 AM
Wildlife technician. I always knew I wanted to work in the wildlife field and I could imagine doing nothing else. I had no idea that it would come with a lot of negatives. When I went to college for this I knew that I would never get rich and that was ok because it was more than enough pay to get by. That is hardly the case now with the rapid inflation of the past five years. The other negative is that while everyone is hunting im working. It is hard to get off to hunt while your working for the other sportsmen during that particular hunting season. If I would have went into fisheries I think it would have been easier to hunt. That being said it is a great job that I don't dread getting up for on most days and wouldn't b qualified for much else.

Sawfish
10-21-2013, 02:09 PM
Sawfish, I understand and respect your concern. I am 2 classes away from having a BS degree. So if something terrible does happen I can get my degree in about 3 months. As we speak my plant is doubling its size/output in development projects. I really hope nothing happens with my job before I'm ready to retire which I will do at 55. If we do go under, I think this whole country will be in a world of hurt

Unfortunately, we are already in a world of hurt.

Topgun 30-06
03-07-2014, 08:44 AM
Unfortunately, we are already in a world of hurt.

Seeing where you say you live out on the left coast, I can certainly see why you made that statement!!!

Hilltop
03-07-2014, 09:55 AM
Career choice is important but the spending decisions you make along the way matter more than anything. I have been a guide, outfitter, fence builder, ranch foreman, truck washer, manager, field rep, salesman, production scheduler, and now I work for a company that builds industrial fans and custom machined parts. I now live 2 blocks from my job...awesome. I have lived in 21 states and travelled all over experiencing anything I could. The one thing that holds true through it all for everyone I know- Those that lived within their means were always ahead of those that did not. Regardless of how much you make or what you do, if you can live within your means you will always have enough. It is perspective and a personal decision to be satisfied with what you have. I know very rich men that don't have enough and I know poor men that are very happy. Good luck in your career choice, but whatever you decide, keep the right perspective.

PS- Find a wife with the same perspective...

OregonJim
03-07-2014, 10:21 AM
Darn HillTop,
You sound like my wife, (specifically) when she tells me to live within our means:o, this being her response when I told her her I need a CO Elk tag to go with my WY Elk Tag. Seems logical and fiscally responsible to me, I'm out there anyways.

Seriously your advice is very wise and profound.
In our case we compliment each other, I spend freely and she does her best to say no, while maintaining the lifestyle we have without me breaking us. Unfortunately we are each too extreme in our role, but it works.

And so not to get completely off topic……. I have arguably the best job in the world which I will retire from in a little more than a year. I have a couple of pics of my "office" in the profile.

Dearhunter3450
03-07-2014, 10:38 AM
I'm a deputy sheriff. I would never limit my career to be able to hunt. I prefer to make money and give my family everything I possibly can. I work at an agency that pays well and am lucky for that. I do get a lot of time off to hunt and will hunt like a wild man in 8 years and three months when I retire! 20 yr retirement only truly good thing about this job and with that being said, be a firman!

Hilltop
03-07-2014, 11:12 AM
Darn HillTop,
You sound like my wife, (specifically) when she tells me to live within our means:o, this being her response when I told her her I need a CO Elk tag to go with my WY Elk Tag. Seems logical and fiscally responsible to me, I'm out there anyways.

Seriously your advice is very wise and profound.
In our case we compliment each other, I spend freely and she does her best to say no, while maintaining the lifestyle we have without me breaking us. Unfortunately we are each too extreme in our role, but it works.

And so not to get completely off topic……. I have arguably the best job in the world which I will retire from in a little more than a year. I have a couple of pics of my "office" in the profile.

Are you in one of those boats??!! Holy cow man you would have to have a set to do that!

Umpqua Hunter
03-07-2014, 11:57 AM
As a kid growing up, I spent many of my days after school hanging around the business my father started in his garage two years before I was born. The year I graduated from high school we moved to Oregon and I studied mechanical engineering at Oregon Tech. If you enjoy math and science, for a four-year degree engineering is hard to beat when it comes to the opportunities and pay it offers.

After graduation, I went to work for the family business, as a project engineer at first. In my late twenties, I took an assignment to do a plant start-up in the Netherlands (manufacturing, technical support, sales). Over the next three years, with a lot of help and support, we got the place set-up, hired locals and trained them, and brought the business to profitability. Three years later we moved back to Oregon, then four years I later lost both of my parents in a tragic auto accident. The family pulled together and reorganized the business and I moved into a VP role responsible for development engineering and business development in Europe.

A couple years later, the pastor resigned at the local non-denominational church we were involved in. I helped teach occasionally for a couple years as the church looked for a new pastor. I ended up resigning from the family business and offered to candidate with the church. For the next 4 years I served as the teaching pastor, with a focus on teaching the Scriptures verse by verse and building a current, authentic, relevant, loving community of believers.

At the end of the fourth year with the church, my wife of 18 years filed for divorce. Before the ink had time to dry on the settlement, she was engaged and soon after married one of my best friends. A year later I married Christy. She has truly been a blessing, my best friend and as solid as a rock. The morning after we returned from our honeymoon we were met with a massive child-custody battle, not of our choosing, that pretty much consumed us the next four years. It would have been far easier to walk away, at times it was tempting, but if I didn’t stay the course, my children would have lost their dad. Last spring the court ruled in our favor and a coordinator was appointed to monitor that parenting plan was enforced, which has dramatically reduced the drama.

I’m now a full time dad. One of my youngest sons and my daughter got to go hunting with me last fall for the first time in years. My son got a Columbia whitetail buck and a cow elk. My daughter just missed getting a doe. This spring break we have plans at the coast, and this summer a trip to Lake Powell, to create some lifetime memories.

For the next phase in life, I would love to build a home with my wife (who had her own business as an interior designer), and start a business related to hunting, fishing or the outdoors.

Life is filled with twists and turns. I don’t know how people do it without a firm faith in the living God, and the confidence that He uses difficult things in our lives to mature us and shape eternal character. I've been hesitant to share my story, but I thought if I can ever be an encouragement to any of you men, I'm here to help. Just send me a PM.

Kevin Root
03-07-2014, 12:04 PM
As a kid growing up, I spent many of my days after school hanging around the business my father started in his garage two years before I was born. The year I graduated from high school we moved to Oregon and I studied mechanical engineering at Oregon Tech. If you enjoy math and science, for a four-year degree engineering is hard to beat when it comes to the opportunities and pay it offers.

After graduation, I went to work for the family business, as a project engineer at first. In my late twenties, I took an assignment to do a plant start-up in the Netherlands (manufacturing, technical support, sales). Over the next three years, with a lot of help and support, we got the place set-up, hired locals and trained them, and brought the business to profitability. Three years later we moved back to Oregon, then four years I later lost both of my parents in a tragic auto accident. The family pulled together and reorganized the business and I moved into a VP role responsible for development engineering and business development in Europe.

A couple years later, the pastor resigned at the local non-denominational church we were involved in. I helped teach occasionally for a couple years as the church looked for a new pastor. I ended up resigning from the family business and offered to candidate with the church. For the next 4 years I served as the teaching pastor, with a focus on teaching the Scriptures verse by verse and building a current, authentic, relevant, loving community of believers.

At the end of the fourth year with the church, my wife of 18 years filed for divorce. Before the ink had time to dry on the settlement, she was engaged and son after married one of my best friends. A year later I married Christy. She has truly been a blessing, my best friend and as solid as a rock. The morning after we returned from our honeymoon we were met with a massive child-custody battle, not of our choosing, that pretty much consumed us the next four years. It would have been far easier to walk away, at times it was tempting, but if I didn’t stay the course, my children would have lost their dad. Last spring the court ruled in our favor and a coordinator was appointed to monitor that parenting plan was enforced, which has dramatically reduced the drama.

I’m now a full time dad. One of my youngest sons and my daughter got to go hunting with me last fall for the first time in years. My son got a Columbia whitetail buck and a cow elk. My daughter just missed getting a doe. This spring break we have plans at the coast, and this summer a trip to Lake Powell, to create some lifetime memories.

For the next phase in life, I would love to build a home with my wife (who had her own business as an interior designer), and start a business related to hunting, fishing or the outdoors.

Life is filled with twists and turns. I don’t know how people do it without a firm faith in the living God, and the confidence that He uses difficult things in our lives to mature us and shape eternal character. I've been hesitant to share my story, but if I can ever be an encouragement to any of you men, I'm here to help. Just send me a PM.

God bless you Jim. I'm proud to have met you here. I was touched deeply with what you wrote and I can relate to a lot of what you wrote so just know it was an encouragement and blessing to me. Thanks for sharing that.

schl44
03-07-2014, 03:22 PM
I was an Ironworker for 36 years. Pay was good with a Pension. I was always lucky enough to stay working which is not always the case for Tradesmen. I worked as much overtime as I could find over the years and saved as much as I could. I missed lots of hunting seasons due to my job, but it paid well enough for me to purchase a nice farm in Wisconsin and retire at age 55.

mattdeere
03-07-2014, 04:16 PM
Manufacture Farm Machinery

OregonJim
03-07-2014, 04:25 PM
Are you in one of those boats??!! Holy cow man you would have to have a set to do that!

Yes, I am on those boats.
Actually I was on the boat in one of the pictures.
It is actually a lot tougher watching my crew from the beach than it is driving them.

Like I said, "best job in the world"
Not getting rich but still having fun…..

Retterath
03-07-2014, 04:25 PM
im a lineman in south dakota and if i had to do it all over again i would do the same thing. Go to michell sd for line school for 9 months and find a job. pay is excellent. you might have to go somewhere u dont want to live right away and get experience and then pick an area u want to go. right now with the company i work with they are doing a lot of hiring out west because of the oil field. if you have any questions pm me.

Dearhunter3450
03-07-2014, 05:52 PM
Darn HillTop,
You sound like my wife, (specifically) when she tells me to live within our means:o, this being her response when I told her her I need a CO Elk tag to go with my WY Elk Tag. Seems logical and fiscally responsible to me, I'm out there anyways.

Seriously your advice is very wise and profound.
In our case we compliment each other, I spend freely and she does her best to say no, while maintaining the lifestyle we have without me breaking us. Unfortunately we are each too extreme in our role, but it works.

And so not to get completely off topic……. I have arguably the best job in the world which I will retire from in a little more than a year. I have a couple of pics of my "office" in the profile.

Great pics and I think you will love the postman when he brings that check every month!! You have def earned it!

hoshour
03-07-2014, 06:14 PM
UH, I didn't know you had been a pastor - that's very cool. I went to seminary, not to become a pastor but because I love to learn. I t was one of the best things I ever did and I use what I learned to teach an adult class at our church, not sure how many years now but at least 12.

Not many people can look down the road and see exactly what their life will be like and how you handle suffering says a lot about who you are. My hat's off to people who don't walk away, who tough it out and do the best they can with God's help. God bless you. I'm glad to know some of your story.

woodtick
03-07-2014, 07:37 PM
Graduate Student and Research Technician, kinda go hand in hand!

RockChucker30
03-07-2014, 07:44 PM
Woodtick, what are you studying?

I spent eight years in the finance industry, then left to start a backpack company. Now I run that and do some work as a buyer at a hunting and outdoor store.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

woodtick
03-07-2014, 07:57 PM
Cattle grazing on pasture forages in comparison to feedlot Cattle. We're looking at the difference in weight in correlation to the Greenhouse Gas Emissions output. Very interesting project, my other studies have consisted of new varieties of Alfalfa, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Cicer Milkvetch and Meadow Brome as pasture forages in Organic Dairy settings and on small scale Beef operations.

packmule
03-07-2014, 08:40 PM
That ought to be a cluster of an experiment!

woodtick
03-07-2014, 09:00 PM
Thanks for the input pack mule, but it's a pretty smooth set-up and has been pretty low stress. I only hire kids that grew up ranching or on a dairy to work for me, no business students or foreigners that have never seen a cow.

packmule
03-07-2014, 09:33 PM
I was just thinking of the nutritional variables in there that are somewhat difficult to control on pasture.

gonhunting247
03-07-2014, 10:33 PM
I've did a little of everything in 47 years. I haven't made a lot of money, but my Dad told me early on, as long as I made enough to keep a roof over our heads and take care of the kids we would be fine. He was right again! I've been a farmer/orchardist, construction worker, truck driver, equipment operator, aluminum plant worker, mill-worker, fabricator, taxidermist, wildlife damage trapper and a fisheries tech.(some were night and weekend work) The last two jobs are hopefully my last as I've been a part-time damage trapper going on 20 yrs. and work in fish & wildlife for 12yrs now. They are both great jobs with flexible schedules and vacation time. I never have had much money, so I've learned to use my part-time trapping and side jobs to fund my hunts.

I still dream of being a part-time outdoor writer, but maybe when I retire!:)

AT Hiker
03-07-2014, 11:18 PM
Cattle grazing on pasture forages in comparison to feedlot Cattle. We're looking at the difference in weight in correlation to the Greenhouse Gas Emissions output. Very interesting project, my other studies have consisted of new varieties of Alfalfa, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Cicer Milkvetch and Meadow Brome as pasture forages in Organic Dairy settings and on small scale Beef operations.

I have a masters in Agriculture, worked for two different Universities as an Extension Agent for 5 years. Now I raise cattle, do taxidermy work and help raise our daughter.

My wife also has a masters in Animal science but now works in health care...funny how things go.

Good luck with your research. We did a similar study here in the South on sulfur fall out from the coal plants and discovered a direct correlation between that and zinc deficiency. Now most of our feeds have a higher ppm of zinc to offset.

woodtick
03-07-2014, 11:25 PM
I was just thinking of the nutritional variables in there that are somewhat difficult to control on pasture.

It's more balanced then one might think, We have grass/legume pasture mixtures and it's surprising what some of these mixtures yield in weight gain compared to a TMR diet. Are one blend is averaging 85% of what our feedlot cows are gaining. For a guy thats marketing pure pasture fed cattle thats a significant advantage to those that are selling grass only. Most are grass mixtures are in the 35-50% range, so roughly half of what were gaining on feedlot. I don't exactly know what meat prices are doing now but our one producer was averaging close to $20 per 100 lbs more on his mixture pasture cows than his closest competitor was getting on just grass pasture cows. The one legume we've got binds with proteins in the rumen and then they disassociate in the abomasum, cows are getting more proteins converted to muscle in a nutshell. Some of his cow's were gaining close to 3.75lbs per day, that's all I can divulge at this current moment.

woodtick
03-07-2014, 11:32 PM
I have a masters in Agriculture, worked for two different Universities as an Extension Agent for 5 years. Now I raise cattle, do taxidermy work and help raise our daughter.

My wife also has a masters in Animal science but now works in health care...funny how things go.

Good luck with your research. We did a similar study here in the South on sulfur fall out from the coal plants and discovered a direct correlation between that and zinc deficiency. Now most of our feeds have a higher ppm of zinc to offset.

That's pretty funny, I hope when I'm done with all this school stuff I can get a job working for an environmental consultant firm. Lots of variety with that kind of job and good pay.

packmule
03-08-2014, 09:17 AM
It's more balanced then one might think, We have grass/legume pasture mixtures and it's surprising what some of these mixtures yield in weight gain compared to a TMR diet. Are one blend is averaging 85% of what our feedlot cows are gaining. For a guy thats marketing pure pasture fed cattle thats a significant advantage to those that are selling grass only. Most are grass mixtures are in the 35-50% range, so roughly half of what were gaining on feedlot. I don't exactly know what meat prices are doing now but our one producer was averaging close to $20 per 100 lbs more on his mixture pasture cows than his closest competitor was getting on just grass pasture cows. The one legume we've got binds with proteins in the rumen and then they disassociate in the abomasum, cows are getting more proteins converted to muscle in a nutshell. Some of his cow's were gaining close to 3.75lbs per day, that's all I can divulge at this current moment.

That's a pretty good gain. Our issue is soil acidity from all the pines. High beef prices are somewhat offset by all the lime & fertilizer that has to be administered to actually get the protein levels needed, then praying to the rain gods. End up buying a lot of 80/20 alfalfa/orchard grass mix out of Kentucky. The bulls get to live the cush life and get a nice diet of winter wheat, grazer & hairy vetch since they're easier to load and transport.

It's the same thing with our deer, never a shortage of browse for them but nutritional quality is often an issue. Steady summer rains will boost them a lot.



Wife did the same thing with school, went the AG dev/animal science route prepping to go into DVM school, ended up going to law school.

IDELKFVR
03-11-2014, 09:29 AM
Wow there are a lot of different paths that people take to get through life. I finished high school messed around drinking beer and chasing girls for about four years which was fun and didn't need to much money then. Decided that wasn't going to work for ever joined the navy and cruised the world in a submarine couldn't see much. Got out joined the air guard and was driving truck still wasn't making much money. joined the volunteer fire department in town and eventually got hired full time that was 16 years ago. Still not rich but make enough to pay the bills and raise a family and most important lots of time off for hunting. The one thing that cops and fireman have in common is we all want to be fireman. Don't believe me see dearhunter3450 last comment its true. LOL

Dearhunter3450
03-12-2014, 10:35 AM
Wow there are a lot of different paths that people take to get through life. I finished high school messed around drinking beer and chasing girls for about four years which was fun and didn't need to much money then. Decided that wasn't going to work for ever joined the navy and cruised the world in a submarine couldn't see much. Got out joined the air guard and was driving truck still wasn't making much money. joined the volunteer fire department in town and eventually got hired full time that was 16 years ago. Still not rich but make enough to pay the bills and raise a family and most important lots of time off for hunting. The one thing that cops and fireman have in common is we all want to be fireman. Don't believe me see dearhunter3450 last comment its true. LOL

Its not my fault I took the wrong test! Just remember fireman need heroes too LOL!! Chasing girls and drinking beer was a lot of fun and a long time ago lol

Squirrel tail
03-13-2014, 03:03 AM
I was a wrangler for a outfitter the past summer and fall before that i was in high school. But since the season ended i dont know what do. So i have been looking for ranching jobs the past few months but my end goal is to save up enough money to go to gunsmithing school without going into debt but almost every smith i talk to tells me done do it so that's discouraging if anyone has any suggestions that would be nice

RockChucker30
03-13-2014, 07:46 AM
Cattle grazing on pasture forages in comparison to feedlot Cattle. We're looking at the difference in weight in correlation to the Greenhouse Gas Emissions output. Very interesting project, my other studies have consisted of new varieties of Alfalfa, Birdsfoot Trefoil, Cicer Milkvetch and Meadow Brome as pasture forages in Organic Dairy settings and on small scale Beef operations.

Sounds interesting. My BS and Masters are in Ag Econ. I had a lot of Animal Science too. Are you at UK?

I have to say I don't miss grad school. Getting out was like trading an 80 hour a week unpaid job in for a 40 hour well paid one. It felt like a vacation.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

tim81212
03-14-2014, 01:07 AM
Grad with an Ind Engineering degree, a long time ago, and couldnt find a job. Now I am 6 months from retirement with the Federal Prison system. Then it is on, a whole lot of fishing and hunting.

arwaterfowler
03-14-2014, 06:41 AM
I've worked for Oldcastle Materials going on 8 years. We produce aggregate materials, asphalt, and concrete in addition to heavy highway construction. I started with them right out of civil engineering school. While it is a big outfit, they are really good to work for. I started as an estimator but have moved up the ought the system to construction manager. Prior to this position, I was able to travel to all of our locations working on training and best practice implementation. 46 states in two years, fun but the travel got tough. I got to do a lot of scouting on my work trips out west. I've been luck.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

jims
03-14-2014, 07:52 AM
I earned a civil engineering degree and went to work for the Missouri Dept of Transportation in KC right out of college. Spent my career as a highway designer and later as a project manager and Dept manager. While you can make more money as an engineer working for a consulting engineering firm, I was attracted to the Missouri DOT because of their very good benefits (including a very good retirement plan) and much better job stability than consulting firms. I retired last year after 28 years with the Missouri DOT. I got to do quite a bit of hunting and fishing last year and hopefully will be able to repeat that pattern over the next many years.

Knappy
03-15-2014, 01:03 PM
I served 13 years in the Air Force, traveled the world and all over the states. This equates to great contacts and hunting situations. I currently work for a large company based out of Salt Lake City that supports military operations across the globe. I am working satellite communications for a large Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. I believe the military is a great life. The pay isn't the best but you do get great benefits, lots of vacation time (on top of holidays) and it can set you up with a skill set that will pay you good once you are out of the service. You can land a contractor job, deploy overseas a few times and make really good money.

Russell M.
03-15-2014, 02:51 PM
I joined the army when I was 18 mainly because I had no plans. I wasn't very interested in going to school and didn't feel like I had much of a chance at getting a decent job. I didn't enjoy it at first but looking back it was the best decision I've ever made. I've seen places of the world that I would never of dreamed of going and made countless friends that I'll have forever. 30 days of vacation comes in pretty handy around hunting season, plus I get at least one four day weekend every month.

johnsd16
03-17-2014, 05:14 PM
Medical resident in internal medicine, done in June. Then I start fellowship in gastroenterology. It's been a long road, started med school in 2007. I'll finish fellowship in 2017 or 2018. I love my job and would never give it up but you have to get creative with your time. I shot my mn shotgun buck this year after climbing in the stand at 11am after a 30 hour overnight. I was tired but it was gun season and the rut was on. Basically the same story in Wisconsin.

My advice is do something you enjoy but never make any hobbies you're passionate about your job. Ask a guy who runs a fishing outfit if they go anywhere near the docks on their day off. They usually say no way. I chose something I liked that offered decent job and financial security with chance at retiring earlier in life and a flexible schedule later perhaps working less than "full time" but still make a living.

Great cross section of folks here. Lots of smart people with the engineers in ag, aerospace and other things. Takes lots of smarts and real world knowledge to do what most do on here.

rcfireninja
03-19-2014, 01:43 PM
Firefighter! Great job with time off to go hunting every season.

gypsumreaper
03-21-2014, 01:17 PM
Tire technician- passenger to OTR not my dream job but it pays the bills


If you get meat from the store then dont criticize me for having the courage to go out and kill my own meat

CrossCreeks
03-21-2014, 02:00 PM
32 years, Law Enforcement , Assistance Chief now ! I started young !

Triple BB
03-21-2014, 02:06 PM
Been working for the man in the insurance industry the past 23 years. Decent pay and a traditional pension are the only things keeping me around. Between waterfowl and big game, I hunt 60 - 70 days a year. Had to meet a few weeks ago with a recently promoted mid level manager. She wanted to know my short term goals. I advised to do the best job I can, exceed company goals and expectations in order to help me reach my long term goals. She sez what's yer long term goals. I said to retire in 5 years and get the heck out of insurance. She had that deer in the head light look. You could tell she was just out of mid level management brainwashing school and they hadn't taught her how to respond to those type of answers. Investing young is a huge part of the puzzle to long term happiness. Marrying a woman who makes more than you doesn't hurt either...

AT Hiker
04-20-2014, 10:38 AM
Medical resident in internal medicine, done in June. Then I start fellowship in gastroenterology. It's been a long road, started med school in 2007. I'll finish fellowship in 2017 or 2018. I love my job and would never give it up but you have to get creative with your time. I shot my mn shotgun buck this year after climbing in the stand at 11am after a 30 hour overnight. I was tired but it was gun season and the rut was on. Basically the same story in Wisconsin.

My advice is do something you enjoy but never make any hobbies you're passionate about your job. Ask a guy who runs a fishing outfit if they go anywhere near the docks on their day off. They usually say no way. I chose something I liked that offered decent job and financial security with chance at retiring earlier in life and a flexible schedule later perhaps working less than "full time" but still make a living.

Great cross section of folks here. Lots of smart people with the engineers in ag, aerospace and other things. Takes lots of smarts and real world knowledge to do what most do on here.

Best of luck to you, the field of medicine is no longer the grand dream of a glorious job that is rewarded not only by good deeds done but also monetarily. Now future MD's are worried about pay and bureaucracy...sad day in America for our health care providers.

PS...if i eat any more Mountain House chili macs I may have to give you a call!!!!!!

Silentstalker
04-20-2014, 11:11 PM
I am a career firefighter/engineer for Salt Lake City Fire Department. I love my job and get the opportunity to hunt quite a bit.

sticksnskullsia
04-30-2014, 04:03 PM
I'm a wetlands biologist. I love to hunt, fish, and trap.

robertpear
05-03-2014, 01:37 AM
Years later I decided to work full time from home when I retired from the Navy so I started a business, goals were simple, work from home, no bosses, no employees, no time clock, no alarm and I needed to make just $50k on top of my enlisted retirement pay to live decently. Before I retired I was already making more than the Navy paid me and I never looked back. I made far more from it that ever expected or went after, to the point I was working to much and buying to many toys and found eventually it was too much stuff and became stressful. I was happiest when I had enough to have a nice home, a nice truck and trailer and a race car, that was plenty of money. Now really paring down and going full time RVing with a most wonderful wife and two big doggies, tweaked ST, life is incredible for me because I made it so, without trying.

wa-hunter
05-03-2014, 12:17 PM
i am a maintenance worker at a national fish hatchery it is a great job and the leave is awesome for hunting!!

robertpear
05-06-2014, 04:35 AM
As arachnids, face or follicle mites have 8 legs, although in the case of Demodex spp., their legs are decidedly stubby. While most mites are round or oval, face mites are long and thin, a body shape that enables them to move in and out of narrow hair follicles with ease. Face mites are tiny, measuring a mere fraction of a millimeter long. The follicle mite spends its life head-down in the follicle, gripping onto the hair or lash tightly with its feet. Strangely, face mites don’t have anuses, leading many entomologists to crack jokes about them being full of, er, feces.

MileHigh
05-06-2014, 10:02 PM
I've been in the military for 13 years now. 30 days paid vacation a years. I'm home, I'm hunting!

Sawfish
05-07-2014, 11:44 AM
Attorney at law, going on 20 years now. For the first ten years I scratched and clawed to find places to hunt. Through luck and hard work and persistence, I've gotten to the place where I have some time to go hunting but not enough time to accept all the invitations I get from friends and clients.

I represent a number of power companies in the upper midwest. All of them are looking at their existing staff and seeing huge numbers of impending retirements. Meanwhile all of us got Christmas presents which use electricity. Use will continue to go up. Someone has to keep the lights on. Those are good jobs. If you have an interest, I know that there's opportunity out there.

Same here for 25 years. Although I like to tell people that I am a hunter by trade, and practice law to feed that habit!

IdahoSkies
05-07-2014, 04:41 PM
Also an Attorney. I do contingent fee work, so I get paid on what I produce. That has the added benefit of producing a flexible schedule, as long as the work gets done and the results are there, I can take time reasoanble time when I need to or want to.

Not the same for everyone (my brother in law lives and dies by the billable hour and his 6am -10 pm work life is one I could never handle).

woodtick
05-08-2014, 10:10 AM
I've farmed for my father and uncles most my life on the side, I've been working on getting through college the last few years and was a truck driver for a local lumber yard while doing my undergrad in Range Management, had to leave that job to start my Masters in Plant Science. I should wrap that up this fall and who knows from there, PhD maybe?? but doubtful. It's never to late to go back to college, I started when I was 18 and quit then after being married for a few years I decided to start back up at 26 and will finish up just shy of my 31st birthday (Masters and all).

P.S. Pay for your school upfront, I've seen way to many colleagues that can't enjoy their lives after school cause of all the student loans they have!!

Sawfish
05-08-2014, 01:43 PM
I've farmed for my father and uncles most my life on the side, I've been working on getting through college the last few years and was a truck driver for a local lumber yard while doing my undergrad in Range Management, had to leave that job to start my Masters in Plant Science. I should wrap that up this fall and who knows from there, PhD maybe?? but doubtful. It's never to late to go back to college, I started when I was 18 and quit then after being married for a few years I decided to start back up at 26 and will finish up just shy of my 31st birthday (Masters and all).

P.S. Pay for your school upfront, I've seen way to many colleagues that can't enjoy their lives after school cause of all the student loans they have!!

Good for you. Stick with it!

tdcour
05-08-2014, 09:42 PM
I've farmed for my father and uncles most my life on the side, I've been working on getting through college the last few years and was a truck driver for a local lumber yard while doing my undergrad in Range Management, had to leave that job to start my Masters in Plant Science. I should wrap that up this fall and who knows from there, PhD maybe?? but doubtful. It's never to late to go back to college, I started when I was 18 and quit then after being married for a few years I decided to start back up at 26 and will finish up just shy of my 31st birthday (Masters and all).

P.S. Pay for your school upfront, I've seen way to many colleagues that can't enjoy their lives after school cause of all the student loans they have!!

I agree completely! I'm in the same boat as you. I graduated in 2009 with my BS in biology and went to work in until 2013 when I started my MS in agronomy through Iowa State. Almost all of it is online, so that helps, but its still tough for sure! We are also paying for class each semester rather than getting a loan... much better long term that way. Good luck finishing up your MS! PM me if you would like to talk ag research companies/positions as I have been working in crop research since I was 14

wisconsin_guy
05-12-2014, 05:05 PM
Union Commercial Carpenter.

Skipped the whole college skem of things and went straight to work. So far the decision seems to have been good to me.

target tony
05-12-2014, 05:29 PM
Union Industrial Maintenance Mechanic. i have been at my trade for 18 years. 6 years with Bemis. couldn't ask for a better job and great people to work with. 3 to 11 shift allows me to hunt every morning if i want.

Sent via Crypto KG84 Algorithm

PointsHunter
05-18-2014, 07:05 AM
Oil/Gas... In Singapore. Limits me to one hunt a year... But usually a pretty good one.

srp
05-18-2014, 07:28 AM
I am Management Consultant, and have been doing it for 20 years. Basically, I help large companies improve profitability. I make a decent income, but it stresses me out. My main creative energy goes towards figuring out how to do something different, but can't escape the cycle of mortgage, and cost of raising a family. No matter how you cut it you will spend most of your waking life working. Best to find something you love, and the hunting you will figure out.

ivorytip
05-18-2014, 10:26 AM
i keep reading this thread and i realized i havent added to it yet. i work as a psychiatric tech ata state hospital on weekends and during week i have a small lawn care buis, and some auto detailing aswell. during the fall i have mon -thur off works great for hunting and not being in the hills with weekend warriors.

hardstalk
05-18-2014, 11:10 AM
Union construction hand. Sprinkler fitter. Pays good. But with any construction trade the job security fails to exist. Ive been playing the game going on 10 years now. Im only 26. Beat up and searching for my passion. Regardless of what you decide. Keep in mind this. Stay away from the rat race as long as possible. Ex. Car payments, mortgages and anything that makes you "have" to work more than you want. Its not how much you make its how much you spend. Most employers understand if you have a passion. And appreciate it. A happy employee is a productive employee. So dont be afraid to announce that at your interviews. Its never hurt me. Sometimes my employers will pay my season off because I bank hours and work hard enough to be appreciated. Which is nice because there has been a couple seasons that without the paid time off I would have to sit around and watch micheal waddel shoot whitetails out of a tree during hunting season. (Yuck!)

Update! Hung up the hard hat. It was a killer transition but had to be done with the market here in my town. I applied and applied for a utility job and finally landed choice #1 back in December. I work for a natural gas utility company now as a service tech. The schedule is pretty interesting. You can work about 50 hours a week and give away all your on call shifts. Or scoop up the on call shifts and work as much o.t has your heart desires. This is the first time in my working career that I have "paid" vacations. Not just "hope to be paid". It's a very independent job. Log on to your laptop and leave the driveway about 6:45-7:00 am and the computer directs you from house to house managing customers needs. (Almost like a police officer, minus the adrenalin rush & guns) It's a 100% pace change from deadline orientated construction. I'm still trying to change my blow and go mentality. Liking it so far! Also still doing the solooutdoor.com side business. Keeps me busy.

Team Kabob
05-19-2014, 12:06 AM
My job is to save lives and make people breath!

NVBird'n'Big
05-19-2014, 11:44 AM
Update! Hung up the hard hat. It was a killer transition but had to be done with the market here in my town. I applied and applied for a utility job and finally landed choice #1 back in December. I work for a natural gas utility company now as a service tech. The schedule is pretty interesting. You can work about 50 hours a week and give away all your on call shifts. Or scoop up the on call shifts and work as much o.t has your heart desires. This is the first time in my working career that I have "paid" vacations. Not just "hope to be paid". It's a very independent job. Log on to your laptop and leave the driveway about 6:45-7:00 am and the computer directs you from house to house managing customers needs. (Almost like a police officer, minus the adrenalin rush & guns) It's a 100% pace change from deadline orientated construction. I'm still trying to change my blow and go mentality. Liking it so far! Also still doing the solooutdoor.com side business. Keeps me busy.

Congrats Hardstalk!

accubond
05-22-2014, 01:32 PM
I'm an API 570,510,653, and CWI inspector at a chemical facory up here in Minnesota.

Bkypreos
05-24-2014, 12:11 AM
I just got on with the AZDOC should be interesting. Great benefits and time off but I know I need to put in the hours before I can accumulate some decent PTO,

droptine
05-24-2014, 10:07 AM
I am a carpenter foreman for a higher end residential contractor and part time taxidermist. Been bending nails for 18 years and taxidermy for 11

swmoelk
05-27-2014, 02:59 PM
Crane operator here. Going back to school though I'm ready for a secure job and some vacation time that can actually be scheduled.

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk

ALDERBUSTED
06-08-2014, 01:33 AM
Ski Area mountain operations manager here in Alaska. Do what you love and you'll never work another day in your life! http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/06/08/masa5e8a.jpg


Sent from headquarters.

CoHiCntry
06-08-2014, 09:21 AM
Ski Area mountain operations manager here in Alaska. Do what you love and you'll never work another day in your life!

Seriously man? It's really not fair for someone to have such a cool job while the rest of us have lame jobs... :cool:

OregonJim
06-08-2014, 09:22 AM
Update! Hung up the hard hat. It was a killer transition but had to be done with the market here in my town. I applied and applied for a utility job and finally landed choice #1 back in December. I work for a natural gas utility company now as a service tech. The schedule is pretty interesting. You can work about 50 hours a week and give away all your on call shifts. Or scoop up the on call shifts and work as much o.t has your heart desires. This is the first time in my working career that I have "paid" vacations. Not just "hope to be paid". It's a very independent job. Log on to your laptop and leave the driveway about 6:45-7:00 am and the computer directs you from house to house managing customers needs. (Almost like a police officer, minus the adrenalin rush & guns) It's a 100% pace change from deadline orientated construction. I'm still trying to change my blow and go mentality. Liking it so far! Also still doing the solooutdoor.com side business. Keeps me busy.

Congratulations, sounds like a great move.

In just about a year I will be transitioning to a new job from 29 years in the same job. (E-9/USCG)
For the first time in 29 years I likely will not be getting paid vacation , but I should have a heck of a lot less stress!!!!!!:o And there shouldn't be anyone to authorize my vacations.
Bonus: I won't be packing up all my stuff and letting movers break it every 4 years :):):)

OregonJim
06-08-2014, 09:33 AM
Ski Area mountain operations manager here in Alaska. Do what you love and you'll never work another day in your life! http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/06/08/masa5e8a.jpg


Sent from headquarters.

Ok I thought I had the coolest job on here (getting to crash around in the surf and get paid for it).
Maybe the only thing better would be if you pilot that helo and run ski patrol on your off days!!!!!!!

Awesome pic too.

marcusvdk
06-08-2014, 10:47 AM
Ski Area mountain operations manager here in Alaska. Do what you love and you'll never work another day in your life! http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/06/08/masa5e8a.jpg


Sent from headquarters.
Holy cow that looks like a sweer job

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk

Dearhunter3450
06-08-2014, 11:13 AM
Congratulations, sounds like a great move.

In just about a year I will be transitioning to a new job from 29 years in the same job. (E-9/USCG)
For the first time in 29 years I likely will not be getting paid vacation , but I should have a heck of a lot less stress!!!!!!:o And there shouldn't be anyone to authorize my vacations.
Bonus: I won't be packing up all my stuff and letting movers break it every 4 years :):):)

Less stress would be hunting and collecting that pension!! Hate to wish life away but I'm looking forward to my twentieth!

Ranger3-94
06-08-2014, 06:45 PM
A corrections oficer for PA here. Spent 4yrs in the army with 2nd ranger bat. on ft. lewis WA got out took the test and with 10 vet preference pionts scored very well on the test. Been a CO for 16 years. Big cons are prisons run 24-7-365 so be ready to work holidays and weekends mandatory overtime so because i get off at 2pm many times i'm lucky enough to have to stay till 10pm with a last minute notice. There is also that thing of having to deal with inmates not the best people in the world to put polically correct. Pros are since I started young I will retire at 50yo without penalty. I get 6 weeks vacation and 11 holidays (since i work them) the pay is good for pa but out cost of living is comparatively low to other places. There is a lot of over time so you can make as much money as you want to spend time in prison but they are not the safest places in the world to work and you need to desensetize yuorself from many things and never ever take your work home.

atrietch
06-08-2014, 07:49 PM
Self employed here. A carpenter with a college degree. High end residential builder in one of those locations that keeps making all the "top city to..." Lists.
I have ten great employees and no kids.
My life revolves around my time spent afield.
A lot of great advise all ready given by many here.

Treeshark
07-11-2014, 07:42 PM
I sell medical devices (implantables)- I really enjoy my work but like all jobs it has its stresses and negatives. I get 3-4 weeks off per year, isn't a ton but isn't horrible either.

micropterus79
07-11-2014, 07:56 PM
Forgive me if this occupation was already posted but if you're looking for a rewarding job/career with ok benefits, vacation and time off-get certified to teach. I went all out and earned my doctorate to teach and do research at the college level but not necessary; you can work yourself into a community college by doing adjunct/part time. They are always looking for folks with real-world experience.

You get summers off to scout and fish, you get time off for fall (school, in general doesn't begin until right at archery season or even a little after but you still have slots to get out before things get crazy) and plenty of time between December and January for rifle hunts. Not too bad a deal...Good luck! I sincerely hope you find a nice niche to keep you going!

Againstthewind
07-11-2014, 08:19 PM
Forgive me if this occupation was already posted but if you're looking for a rewarding job/career with ok benefits, vacation and time off-get certified to teach. I went all out and earned my doctorate to teach and do research at the college level but not necessary; you can work yourself into a community college by doing adjunct/part time. They are always looking for folks with real-world experience.

You get summers off to scout and fish, you get time off for fall (school, in general doesn't begin until right at archery season or even a little after but you still have slots to get out before things get crazy) and plenty of time between December and January for rifle hunts. Not too bad a deal...Good luck! I sincerely hope you find a nice niche to keep you going!

I thought your name was a tiny dinosaur, but I looked it up and it said largemouth bass. Is that right? That is some good advise. I might have to look into that. Its way better to work inside in the winter and have the summers off I would think.