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tttoadman
05-10-2013, 01:45 PM
I am covering alot of conditioning miles every week now looking forward to some serious packing this fall. I hope this also helps to toughen up my feet. I wear wool socks when hunting. I sweat alot on my feet, and they always give out before the rest of me does. I was going to pick up one of these gel or ?? insoles. My boots are light and feel good. It only gets bad after continuous 8+ mile days or heavy packing. Do I need to take steps to get my feet dried out nicely every night? Do you take a tiny bit of powder to put on your feet every night? I will be hunting in October and November.

What does everyone do to keep your feet in good shape for 2 or 3 weeks of solid hunting ??

ssliger
05-10-2013, 02:33 PM
Are you wearing old style wool socks or the new merino wool? I have some Lorpen merino wool socks that are awesome. My feet sweat a ton, so I change my socks mid day and that really helps. Make sure they dry out every night.

tttoadman
05-12-2013, 02:40 PM
definitely old style. I saw those Lorpen at sportsmans yesterday. I definitely don't think I was getting dried out socks everyday. Hopefully that is most my problem. That sounds like a good start. I also saw some insoles that I like. I have a plan A.

tim
05-23-2013, 05:55 PM
if you can remeber to elevate your feet above your heart for about 10-15 minutes at night, helps alot.

tttoadman
05-23-2013, 06:10 PM
if you can remeber to elevate your feet above your heart for about 10-15 minutes at night, helps alot.

I am afraid most of these ideas and others I have read are just basic care. I am guilty of wearing my boots from 5:00AM to 9:00PM every day instead of giving my feet a periodic break. I think that abuse only shows up during hunting outings. I have been putting in a few more miles in the last few years, and it is bringing this issue to the surface. I can see the value in resting with your feet up during the day also. Easy enough to do while taking a snack break.

25contender
05-23-2013, 08:47 PM
A few tips that have helped me as I almost destroyed my feet years ago on a hunt out west. Make sure your boots are a good fit. Many times a well worn boot seems to allow way to much foot movement within the boot. Get some good insoles as they do make a difference when you are wearing your boots all day. I always wear boot liners under merino wool socks and normally take off my boots and socks Midday when I eat lunch.I always keep a few extra pair of socks in my pack so if I have to change my socks I can. Moisture is a killer on your feet. You might want to try a foot powder to help keep them dry. In my opinion going down steep hills can really do a number on your heels and toes or at least that is the problem I had with ill fitting boots. My feet (heels and toes) would slide back and forth in the boot going up and down steep grades. I finally found a good boot that would lock my foot in place and that eliminated the sliding inside the boot.

Ricochet
05-23-2013, 08:56 PM
I keep my hunting/hiking boots on as little as possible. When I'm in camp I wear my camp shoes. My camp shoes are romeo's. Easy slip-ons. I even have inside the tent slippers. At night I take the insoles out of my boots to dry them off. I keep 4 pairs of socks in my pack and change through out the day. I might not use all four pairs but they are there when I need them. When I'm packing to go on a trip I bring tons of socks. I don't bring a specific amount but it is in the 30 pairs range. I wear the nike stay dry socks. Around camp I wear the heavier wool socks, for comfort. When I'm usually around camp it is cold so the heavier socks feel good. Your feet should be your number one priority. I'm not saying that I some great hunter that has hunted all over the planet, but I have spent alot of time in boots. I was a paratrooper in the army and my boots/feet were very important to me and my team.

Fatrascal
05-25-2013, 04:27 AM
I found that wearing a soft comfy boot was a mistake. You still want comfort but you want stiffness also. When your boots are too soft your arches are allowed to go flat while you are carrying heavy loads. A stiffer boot gives you more support and protects your arches better. Also, if your wool socks are too thick your feet slide more than if you have a thin wool sock. One more thing. Several years ago I started using trekking poles and found that they help you use your ankles less for balancing which keeps your feet and ankles from getting fatigued. I always told my friends that used them that they were yuppie sissys but after using them I found I can walk longer and further and my feet feel better. fatrascal.

Catahoula12
05-25-2013, 09:08 AM
As far as your feet are concerned taking care of them really year round is a must!!! That means don't let callous build up start. Take care to remove old dead skin to avoid cracking/bleeding. Keep skin soft and supple. As far as socks are concerned, the newer materials used for moisture wicking are far superior. I like a thin sock personally with moisture wicking properties. If your feet stay dry from sweat they will always stay warm and in good shape, even in an uninsulated boot. I usually have 10-12 pairs of socks with me. Also, around camp get your boots off and wear something comfortable, breathable. I wear running shoes personally. Kicking your feet up above your head to reduce any inflammation from the days hunt helps also...

larrylur
05-27-2013, 11:12 AM
I can't speak to the moisture issue as my feet don't sweat that much, but as far as support I have had numerous bouts with foot pain and plantar fasciitis. If you have pain in your arches and or heels, super feet are the next best thing next to custom inserts from a podiatrist.

http://www.superfeet.com/

Take out the original inserts from your boots and or shoes and replace them with the super feet and my feet stay in great shape. Just because of the added support. Not only my feet, but my back also feels better when I wear them. Your feet are the foundation for most everything else above them.

tttoadman
05-27-2013, 09:52 PM
This has been good stuff. I wanted to inquire with the group, to help avoid wasting money on too many experiments. I will be taking my boots with me to sportmans this week and trying some stuff out. I need to keep an open mind about replacing my boots if needed. They are really light, but not a super rigid boot.

Fatrascal
05-28-2013, 12:05 AM
My personal favorite is Kenetrek but I'm sure there are plenty of other great choices as well. fatrascal.

mcseal2
05-28-2013, 10:07 PM
Boot choice depends on the area you are hunting. I wear the Lorpen midweight wool socks year round for work or easier hunts with whatever boots fit the day's activities. I really like those socks for normal use. For lots of walking I like the Cabelas Ingenius socks and either Danner Pronghorn or Cabelas Meindel Alaskan Hunter boots depending on the severity of the terrain. I carry a light cheap pair of slipper style moccasins also for around camp. I hate to pack unnecessary ounces and am a stickler for weighing every item on my postage scale, but these still seem worth it. I've considered aquasocks or other options but the point is to let my feet breath and dry so the rubber sole leather moccasins let plenty of air in and around the foot. My current ones weigh 12.3oz each according to my postage scale, so I am in the market for lighter ones if anyone has any suggestions. I hate the weight but like the way my feet hold up this way and dry. I usually have to use the restroom a time or two at night and like having the mocs to slip out in. As was mentioned earlier hiking poles are popular for a reason too, especially packing meat they can really help.

Umpqua Hunter
05-30-2013, 06:05 PM
I was looking for a new pair of boot the other day and came across a video series called "Mountain Foot Care Tips" done by Guy Eastman. The link is on the Lathrop and Son's website. Here is the link:

https://lathropandsons.gostorego.com/custom-footbeds

Once you get there, look on the right hand side of the page and click on the various subjects: Proper Fit, Socks, Insoles, Moisture Control, Blister Prevention.

tttoadman
05-31-2013, 08:13 AM
I was looking for a new pair of boot the other day and came across a video series called "Mountain Foot Care Tips" done by Guy Eastman. The link is on the Lathrop and Son's website. Here is the link:

https://lathropandsons.gostorego.com/custom-footbeds

Once you get there, look on the right hand side of the page and click on the various subjects: Proper Fit, Socks, Insoles, Moisture Control, Blister Prevention.

I found this too. what a huge help.

Kevin Root
05-31-2013, 11:33 AM
Guy Eastman's foot care clips on YouTube were pretty good. I saw them posted a while back. Best thing for me is keeping the abrasion down in the boot in all the ways mentioned in his clips. Going up and down hills and then adding weight with a pack can increase the abrasion factor similar to pushing down on sandpaper when trying to sand more surface away. Abrasion and slippage in the boot is when I get blisters at least. Switching out socks and keeping an extra pair when I have a backpack on for me helps a lot. It also helps to remind me to check my feet more often to find potential problem spots before they become blisters.

25contender
07-29-2013, 11:30 AM
Hey everyone. I was talking with my brother this past weekend about foot care. He is a SF Medic and had a few suggestions. He said if you have a history of Hotspots or getting blisters no matter what boot you wear try putting 1.5 " Leukotape on those areas before blisters or hotspots start. He said this tape will stay in place even with moisture. He said to make sure you cover a larger area than what is effected. The most important part is to keep your feet dry, Wear good socks, and change socks if they start to get damp especially with heavy packs. Just thought some may be interested.

BKC
07-29-2013, 06:11 PM
I mark on a calendar about 2 months out and clip my toenails and clip every 2 weeks. I try to clip about a week before the hunt so my toe nails are at optimum length, not to long to dig in the front of the boot and not to short to maybe be sore for a day or two. This sounds a little wierd but sore feet can screw up a good hunt. In the field if it is not to cold I take my shoes off and give my feet a rest during lunch. Set them down wind for obvious reasons !

brooks
08-08-2013, 07:00 PM
Over the years I have spent a small fortune on good boots but the best thing I have found is ...tape. Tape them up good, wear good smart wool or synthetic material socks lase them up good and hike all day...everyday.

mnhunter
08-09-2013, 06:48 AM
Are you talking 2-3 weeks out in the field, or will you be heading in for a night here and there? I think most of the advise above is good, the problem I see you might have is packing enough socks to change them consistently over that period of time. A dirty sock is almost as bad as a wet one, once they have been soaked with sweat and oil they loose their ability to protect your foot from abrasion. You might have to come up with a way to wash your socks in the field. You should be able to accomplish this in any stream; you probably don't need detergent but at least a good soak and hand washing.

Huntography
08-09-2013, 07:05 AM
Besides getting a good pair of boots, take a look at the merino wool Superfeet.

They regulate the temp of my feet and keep stink factor down.

I also use deodorant on my feet to help them from sweating. Weird I know but has worked for me for years.

Rudy

Z Barebow
08-09-2013, 09:30 AM
I mark on a calendar about 2 months out and clip my toenails and clip every 2 weeks. I try to clip about a week before the hunt so my toe nails are at optimum length, not to long to dig in the front of the boot and not to short to maybe be sore for a day or two. This sounds a little wierd but sore feet can screw up a good hunt. In the field if it is not to cold I take my shoes off and give my feet a rest during lunch. Set them down wind for obvious reasons !

I'll second taking off your boots while eating lunch. I even have a second pair of socks in my hunting pack and switch out at lunch. When warm in archery season, snack in bare feet and let the sun and air dry your feet out.

Knappy
03-17-2014, 06:16 AM
What a great thread! I'm going to order some Lathrop and Sons Synergy footbeds. My heels blistered so bad last year, it almost ruined my hunt. Even walking on flat ground, I could feel and hear my heel rubbing. I never noticed this during the break in period. I wore these boots for months prior to my hunt. I think I let my feet get too wet from sweat and once I noticed the sore spots, it was too late. The damage was done. I hope these footbeds can save my feet this year. Thanks everyone for all the advice and tips on here. I appreciate it!

RockChucker30
03-17-2014, 06:34 AM
I prefer non waterproof trail runners to waterproof boots. They dry much faster if they get wet. I also keep my feet comfortable with different socks. Neoprene socks over wool keep feet warm during rain or creek crossings. Dry socks to change into are nice, and this year I'm trying goretex socks to help stay dry in wet conditions.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Bitterroot Bulls
03-17-2014, 07:01 AM
What a great thread! I'm going to order some Lathrop and Sons Synergy footbeds. My heels blistered so bad last year, it almost ruined my hunt. Even walking on flat ground, I could feel and hear my heel rubbing. I never noticed this during the break in period. I wore these boots for months prior to my hunt. I think I let my feet get too wet from sweat and once I noticed the sore spots, it was too late. The damage was done. I hope these footbeds can save my feet this year. Thanks everyone for all the advice and tips on here. I appreciate it!

A footbed alone won't prevent heel slip. You will need to find a boot that fits in a way that keeps your heel on the footbed. Spending the money on custom fitting can help.

HuskyMusky
03-20-2014, 12:36 PM
I have heard orthotics do wonders!?

although part of me thinks one should just train more and strengthen those foot muscles vs. relying on more support etc...


perhaps that hunting boot/sneaker?

ArmyArcher
03-20-2014, 03:36 PM
Some great points in this thread. For me it depends on what the foot care issue is. Tought to get around more serious issues like planters fasciitis.

I use layering to prevent blisters and my method has worked 100% regardless of distance, weight, boot etc... It starts with knee high panty hose. Laugh now, if you try it, you'll likely not stop. You can get a box of 8-10 pair at any Wal-Mart/Drug store for under $5. The next layer is a moisture wicking poly pro type sock. Current ones are by Wigwam and also assist with scent control. The outer layer is a merino wool sock thickness dependent on climate. Current pair are mid-weight Lorpen.

Last Dec packing in to AZ, was the forth day before I needed some moleskin maintenance and that was a previously healed blister spot due to another activity where I failed to follow my own method.

Like mentioned already, when I broke for lunch, I aired my feet out. All three would dry very rapidly and little to no scent. Combine this with Dead Down Wind powder and you've got a combination that will work in nearly all conditions.

Depending on how hard I push, my legs normally give before my feet. Need to remember to continually stretch, monitor water intake, and have some vitamin M on hand to address the soreness.

Fink
03-20-2014, 05:26 PM
I prefer non waterproof trail runners to waterproof boots. They dry much faster if they get wet. I also keep my feet comfortable with different socks. Neoprene socks over wool keep feet warm during rain or creek crossings. Dry socks to change into are nice, and this year I'm trying goretex socks to help stay dry in wet conditions.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I used to train in trail runners. I stopped when I about blew up my leg, hiking with a 75 pound pack. Those styles of shoes just aren't made to help you carry heavier loads.

During the summer, I callous up my feet pretty good walking around the pool barefoot, it seems to help strengthen my feet.

MWScott72
05-26-2014, 08:07 AM
Great thread! I had a big bout with plantar fascia is after a particularly grueling pack out. Root cause were my boots were too flexible for the load carried. I got a stiff pair of Kenetreks which solved the problem. After this, my heel rubbed in the heel cup of the Kenetreks giving me blisters if I didn't tape up well. I found out that Kenetreks will stretch your heel cup to help alleviate this problem. I look forward to the results this fall.

Also, on the question of custom orthotics, my opinion is they are the gold standard for proper foot and arch alignment. I have very flat feet and the customs have been life savers. Well worth the $150 investment and they'll last for 4-5 years of constant wear.

I also like thinner socks. As stated, if your socks are too thick, they allow you foot to slip around too much. This can be an issue in cold weather so it's a fine line to toe...pun intended.

tttoadman
05-26-2014, 08:39 AM
As I continue to get more education on this subject, I am slowly working my way away from my cheap light boots. I have picked up a pair of Lowa Tibets with some merino liner socks. A lot of the reason I made the move was learning the importance of lacing techniques and the rigid mid sole. I have put these through the test on a few hikes. I have zero heal slip. I bombed down the hill without the trecking poles to see how hard my toes would jam, and I am really pleased. I could feel the whole load being put on the lacing pulling my foot back and down to the back of the boot.

I still hate the idea of wearing heavier boots all day. My pack system is always ready to pack heavy back to camp after a kill, so I think it is just going to be the right choice every time I go out.

Againstthewind
05-27-2014, 07:31 PM
I prefer non waterproof trail runners to waterproof boots. They dry much faster if they get wet. I also keep my feet comfortable with different socks. Neoprene socks over wool keep feet warm during rain or creek crossings. Dry socks to change into are nice, and this year I'm trying goretex socks to help stay dry in wet conditions.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

That's a good point. If I'm not in snow, I usually go with waterproof, non-insulated hiking boots because they will dry out faster if I fall in the creek or something. It is normally pretty dry where I go in the fall, so its usually not an issue. Changing socks is a must for me. I am posting so I can find this thread without trying too hard and read them all. There is lots of good advise.

25contender
06-03-2014, 07:08 AM
I will tell you from a bad experience many years ago, it is no fun when your feet are in bad shape. You can be in the best shape in the world but if you cant walk all that hard work is just a waste, I think that your feet are probably the most important part of your body to take care of. Lots of great advice on this thread.