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25contender
06-03-2013, 11:11 AM
Hey guys I have been going through my gear regrouping and one thing stands out to me. For the past few trips I have made packing in I have struggled with daily calorie count yet packing light. I normally pack in for five - seven days at a time. I am not quite as high tech as some here but would like to be more efficient when packing in food. What are you guys packing in for meals to get that calorie count. Also how are you efficiently packing that food in your pack. I feel like I need 2400-2500 calories a day to keep up my energy level as I am constantly on the move. I will be honest I have never pack in any freeze dried meals and feel this my be a good way to lighten up the pack significantly. I have packed in some MRE meals but find they are just as bulky but at least they have that calorie count needed. Any tips would be appreciated. Mark

Eric Bailey
06-03-2013, 11:26 AM
I pack freeze-dried meals, high calorie low sugar bars, jerky, trail mix with lots of nuts, and lots of caffeine to kick start a second wind if I need it.

Eric Bailey
06-03-2013, 11:29 AM
I'm pretty sure I burn > 4,000 calories a day hiking 6 or more hours with a pack on my back. I don't eat that many because I tend to lose my appetite when working that hard, but I eat as much as I can possibly get down. Lots of water too.

JMSZ
06-03-2013, 04:00 PM
I'm pretty sure I burn > 4,000 calories a day hiking 6 or more hours with a pack on my back. I don't eat that many because I tend to lose my appetite when working that hard, but I eat as much as I can possibly get down. Lots of water too.

I'm like you, I lose my appetite when I'm working like that and it bit me last year. I didn't eat nearly enough and after three days I was wiped out.

To 25Contender, in regards to MREs, another good thing about them is that they can be eaten straight out of the package with no prep and you don't need to carry extra water to reconstitute them.

I took a bunch of MREs last year and they were nice, but as you mentioned, they're bulky, heavy and expensive.

I'm planning a mix this year - Bridgford MRE sandwiches (you can buy them from the company that makes them), instant ramien with tuna fish (my one planned hot meal per day), Carnation Instant Breakfast + instant milk + instant coffee, Cliff Mojo Bars and Honey Stingers (Kudos to arrowslinger and dhershberger for turning me on to those).

That puts me at 2850ish calories per day and there is only one meal I have to boil water for, everything else can be eaten with cold water or straight out of the pack.

The sandwiches, mojo bars and honey stinger waffles are small and come in single packages, so it's easier to grab one and munch on it while I'm taking a break or even walking.

I found last fall that I was in a hurry in the morning and I just wasn't stopping much and I didn't want to have to take the time to pull everything out, set up my stove, etc, during the day.

So, this year I'm planning one hot meal per day for dinner, when I'm bedding down for the night.

Musket Man
06-03-2013, 05:35 PM
I pack mountain house freeze dried and mix single serve instant mashed potatoes into them for dinner. Pop tarts, cliff bars, tuna, crackers, granola bars, trail mix, ect during the day. I always take a water filter and normally can find water close enough to camp that water for the freeze dried stuff is not an issue. David Longs book gives alot of good info on this too.

25contender
06-03-2013, 06:20 PM
Yes I am good on the water I carry a filter as well. Water is fairly close by. I think I need to make up a list of some of the suggestions and from some of the other threads here and see what will work the best. I have never tried the Cliff bars or the Mountain House dinners. I have been a big Tuna Pack and Kipper Snack fan in the past but it gets old after a few days. Lots of homemade trail mix, some olive oil and honey stinger waffles. Does anyone vacuum seal any of their individual daily meal packs? I was thinking about doing that this year.

Montana
06-04-2013, 06:19 AM
If you have interest I can email you my spreadsheet. I have a breakdown that has calorie count, weight, sodium, carb, and protein count as I felt those were the most important categories. I make myself eat 5 times a day and at certain times, it may just be a cliff bar at 10:30 but I watch the clock and stick to it. Never know when it will turn to go time and I don't want to run out of juice.

25contender
06-04-2013, 06:38 AM
If you have interest I can email you my spreadsheet. I have a breakdown that has calorie count, weight, sodium, carb, and protein count as I felt those were the most important categories. I make myself eat 5 times a day and at certain times, it may just be a cliff bar at 10:30 but I watch the clock and stick to it. Never know when it will turn to go time and I don't want to run out of juice.
That would be great . It would be nice to see your breakdown. I like the point about not running out of juice. I have been there and done that!! Thanks Mark e-mail archerm@aol.com

MacDonald
06-04-2013, 07:45 AM
Mark, take a look at the energy replacement drinks that are sold at cycling and running shops. Mixing them in your water will not only supplement your calorie burn, but help to maintain your electrolyte balance and allow your body to recover quicker from heavy exercise. I'm taking in freeze-dried stuff for morning and evening, and adding cheese, Costco crumbled bacon, nuts and fruit for modified trail mix, and I'm snacking frequently during the day. Since I'm an "old guy", I also take in plenty of Tylenol and some cognac in a small Platypus bladder. It's nice to have a little thimble-full of something while I'm hovering over my spotting scope in the evenings!

tttoadman
06-04-2013, 01:27 PM
I pick up a big bag of dried fruit. The bananas, apples, and cranberries add a great tasting treat a couple times a day and are light. I haven't explored the nutritional value of these too much. I consider these to be my mid day treats. the cliff bars are a standard for me also.

lipton noodle soup packs light and is one of my favs. it cooks quick and you can throw it in the water prior to boiling. nice to help warm up before bed at night. I would agree with some others that early morning cooking is not for me.

I could shave a few pounds and a pile of mountain house meals if I went with cold only, but I can't quite decide if i want to do that. We are looking at staying on top for 9 to 10 days, and i may need to ditch the hot food to save weight and space.

Elk Hunter
06-04-2013, 10:33 PM
I agree with Eric Bailey about the calorie burn and appetite lose. Just the high altitude ups your calorie burn. They say it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it. If your out that long your appetite may catch up, but otherwise I think the only way you could keep up would be to take a day off during the week, and who's going to do that? I try to minimize weight lose but it always happens. Getting your weight up before you go can help.

I look at calories per ounce when choosing what to take. I have found energy bars to be a waste, except maybe for the Snickers Marathon bar. Most have a lot of sugar and I can't get ten feet on one. For breakfast I have Old Fashioned Oatmeal with Nido freeze dried whole milk, Spiru-tein protein powder, and raisins. Sometimes I add peanuts. Just add it with boiling water to a insulated bottle and let it cook. Nature's Path Pumpkin Flax Granola can be substituted for for the oatmeal for a faster breakfast, but cold. I plan to add flax seed meal to the mix this year (something I read). Oberto's pork jerky, peanut M&M's, cashews, dried tomatoes, walnuts, and peanuts are good snacks. Mountain House is good. The Sweet & Sour and Chili Mac with Beef are my favorite, two serving size only. Get the propak type or it gets bulky fast. Mission Wraps (Walmart) are good, high calorie, hold up well, and can be used with the MH chili mac to make a burrito. I also carry Bear Creek freeze dried soup (Walmart). Tortilla and Hot & Sour are my favorite. I add twice the recommended amount to boiling water in the insulated bottle to up the calories. Tyson's sausage crumbles are good if the OAT cooperates and are high calorie. Add to the Mountain House or the soup. High fat is good. Foil packaged tuna IN OIL and salmon are good for lunch and when taking a break. I also take Alpine Apple Cider mix. Great before getting into the tent for the night and helps you get more water down. Hard boiled eggs are good for the first few days, but I don't do that much. A frozen steak would be good the first day too, but you would have to build a fire, and I never do that.

A hiking buddy goes all week on peanuts, raisins, and jerky. Thats all he eats all week, every snack, every meal. For me variety is important, otherwise consumption goes down.

az.mountain runner
06-04-2013, 11:10 PM
Check out wilderness athlete products a little pricey but good drink mixes to help that energy need , I'm in my late fifties and I'll start using some of their products a week before the hunt starts ,they make a noticeable difference for me.

Eric Bailey
06-05-2013, 10:32 AM
I agree with Eric Bailey about the calorie burn and appetite lose. Just the high altitude ups your calorie burn. They say it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it. If your out that long your appetite may catch up, but otherwise I think the only way you could keep up would be to take a day off during the week, and who's going to do that? I try to minimize weight lose but it always happens. Getting your weight up before you go can help.

I look at calories per ounce when choosing what to take. I have found energy bars to be a waste, except maybe for the Snickers Marathon bar. Most have a lot of sugar and I can't get ten feet on one. For breakfast I have Old Fashioned Oatmeal with Nido freeze dried whole milk, Spiru-tein protein powder, and raisins. Sometimes I add peanuts. Just add it with boiling water to a insulated bottle and let it cook. Nature's Path Pumpkin Flax Granola can be substituted for for the oatmeal for a faster breakfast, but cold. I plan to add flax seed meal to the mix this year (something I read). Oberto's pork jerky, peanut M&M's, cashews, dried tomatoes, walnuts, and peanuts are good snacks. Mountain House is good. The Sweet & Sour and Chili Mac with Beef are my favorite, two serving size only. Get the propak type or it gets bulky fast. Mission Wraps (Walmart) are good, high calorie, hold up well, and can be used with the MH chili mac to make a burrito. I also carry Bear Creek freeze dried soup (Walmart). Tortilla and Hot & Sour are my favorite. I add twice the recommended amount to boiling water in the insulated bottle to up the calories. Tyson's sausage crumbles are good if the OAT cooperates and are high calorie. Add to the Mountain House or the soup. High fat is good. Foil packaged tuna IN OIL and salmon are good for lunch and when taking a break. I also take Alpine Apple Cider mix. Great before getting into the tent for the night and helps you get more water down. Hard boiled eggs are good for the first few days, but I don't do that much. A frozen steak would be good the first day too, but you would have to build a fire, and I never do that.

A hiking buddy goes all week on peanuts, raisins, and jerky. Thats all he eats all week, every snack, every meal. For me variety is important, otherwise consumption goes down.

These are great suggestions. Going to have to try some of them this year to get a little more variety.

Eric Bailey
06-05-2013, 10:57 AM
I'm not sure how they compare in terms of calories per ounce to what you normally carry, but I eat a bear valley pemmican bar most days for lunch along with some trail mix. They have 420 calories in 3.75 ounces (112/oz) . While they do have a fair amount of sugar they have more complex carbs than the average energy bar (about half of total carbs) along with 17 grams of protein. They don't taste great, but nothing tastes "good" to me in the middle of the day when I'm backpacking.

I too eat granola for breakfast. I eat the mountain house Granola With Milk and Blueberries. It is the meal that is easiest for me to get down every day. It has 520 calories and less than 1/3 of the carbs are from sugar. I only bring a spork and my jetboil stove with me so I like that I can just eat it out of the bag. I think I'll try bringing some protein powder this year and mix it in. Good idea.

Graylight
06-05-2013, 04:55 PM
Be aware that the first two to three days, you're appetite will be almost gone due to the elevation changes. While your body is aclimating, the urge to eat is diminished greatly by the fact that you may not feel nauseous but the effects of elevation will make your stomach sensitive and at best you might squeeze down a few snacks and a mountain house meal... Just be sure to hydrate to help with the headaches and suppliment additives to your water with something like Wilderness Athlete "Hydrate and Recover" with glucosamine to reduce muscle and joint fatigue.

Kevin Root
06-05-2013, 05:43 PM
I typically lose my appetite for three days or more depending how active I get and or how high in altitude I get or how hard I push myself. Fortunately I don't get much of an altitude sickness, sensitive stomach other than some slight headaches. Some of my friends get out right sick unless they acclimate slowly. I have to almost force and remind myself to eat and drink. Last week I went from 400 ft elevation where I live and drove a few hours up to 7,200 ft where I started my backpack hike in several miles up to a gain of 9,000 + ft. and then setting up camp. Keeping hydrated and some calories not only helps with my energy level, mind and muscles from fatigue but helps with me keeping warm when it's cold out or cool when it's warm out. I used to like to push myself on less when I was younger because I thought I could get away will less, perhaps I could but I think it's just wiser and safer to keep gas in the truck so to speak instead of trying to get around the mountains on an empty tank whenever possible.

Multi-SpeciesHunter
06-05-2013, 06:11 PM
I didn't read all above posts, but size of the person is VERY important. I'm about 6'2 190lb. I need a lot more than my 5'7 160lb hunting partner. But I also dont need as much as a guy who is 6'4 250lb. And I might want 3500 while sheep hunting, but only 2500 while mule deer hunting rolling hills. I'm sure my post isn't as detailed as above posts, but hopefully my 2 cents helped someone.

Elk Hunter
06-05-2013, 06:37 PM
Your pemmican bar and granola sound like good ideas Eric. I will look those up. Know what you mean about things not tasting good. I've had things that taste great at home just refuse to go down by the third day. Cliff bars are the worst for some reason.

Headaches, I believe, are a early sign of dehydration. I start drinking water, whether I need it or not, on the way out. A camelback type system is essential I think to maintaining hydration on the trail. I at least will tend not to go to the trouble of dragging out a water bottle as often as I should on the trail. With a camelback I drink water every time I think about it, especially the first three days.

I know what Kevin Root is saying about maintaining body temperature. I have read that dehydration will cause the body to lose its ability to regulate temperature, just not sure its the same thing. Maybe just not getting enough calories for the activity level. You do have to feed the engine if you want it to work. The body will get what it needs, even if its muscle mass, which is why I try to minimize weight loss.

Elk Hunter
06-05-2013, 07:06 PM
I didn't read all above posts, but size of the person is VERY important. I'm about 6'2 190lb. I need a lot more than my 5'7 160lb hunting partner. But I also dont need as much as a guy who is 6'4 250lb. And I might want 3500 while sheep hunting, but only 2500 while mule deer hunting rolling hills. I'm sure my post isn't as detailed as above posts, but hopefully my 2 cents helped someone.

That is a good point Multi-SpeciesHunter. I am 5'11" and around 180lbs. Not sure how to determine calorie needs, but for me its not based on how hungry I am. I have a worksheet that will calculate the calories per day that I am carrying, but many times I think I am probably doing only 1300 to 1400 calories per day on a 7 day 70 mile section of the CDT. Never hungry, eat all I can, and weight is down to around 165lbs by the time I get off the trail. One of the other hikers, who is bigger than me, carries about twice what I carry, eats almost all of it, and doesn't lose nearly as much weight as I do. I've tried but I couldn't begin to eat that much. He also lives in Colorado Springs while I'm in Missouri. To many variables to say definitely cause and affect, but when I found doing research that it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it, it got my attention.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 07:39 AM
Be aware that the first two to three days, you're appetite will be almost gone due to the elevation changes. While your body is aclimating, the urge to eat is diminished greatly by the fact that you may not feel nauseous but the effects of elevation will make your stomach sensitive and at best you might squeeze down a few snacks and a mountain house meal... Just be sure to hydrate to help with the headaches and suppliment additives to your water with something like Wilderness Athlete "Hydrate and Recover" with glucosamine to reduce muscle and joint fatigue.

I need to try something like this for this year.

Last fall was my first time hunting at high elevation, I was aware of the really important altitude sickness symptoms (the ones that would put you in the hospital), but I guess I didn't get well enough versed on the more subtle effects of altitude adjustment.

I didn't get headaches or nausea, I just slept like crap (sleeping pad contributed to that plus a sore back), I just wasn't all that hungry and by the third day, my body just hurt. I did drink plenty of water, maybe not quite as much as I should have, but I made sure to drink regularly.

Letting the cold creep up on me like I did (stupid mistake on my part) didn't help matters either, but at least I recognized the symptoms of that, which contributed to my decision to leave early.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 07:50 AM
That is a good point Multi-SpeciesHunter. I am 5'11" and around 180lbs. Not sure how to determine calorie needs, but for me its not based on how hungry I am. I have a worksheet that will calculate the calories per day that I am carrying, but many times I think I am probably doing only 1300 to 1400 calories per day on a 7 day 70 mile section of the CDT. Never hungry, eat all I can, and weight is down to around 165lbs by the time I get off the trail. One of the other hikers, who is bigger than me, carries about twice what I carry, eats almost all of it, and doesn't lose nearly as much weight as I do. I've tried but I couldn't begin to eat that much. He also lives in Colorado Springs while I'm in Missouri. To many variables to say definitely cause and affect, but when I found doing research that it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it, it got my attention.

The Live Strong website tells you figure out your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories your body requires just to stay alive. They then have other charts that help you get an idea of how many additional calories your body will burn based on the type and level of activity that you're doing.

I do know that military mountain and artic warfare rations are designed to supply 3000 - 4000 calories per day.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/259763-how-to-calculate-daily-energy-expenditure/

25contender
06-06-2013, 10:41 AM
This has turned into a great thread!! I have gotten a lot of great ideas and some great suggestions. Tough to change older ways but I will definitely make some changes. I am really trying to lighten the load yet get keep the nutritional value. I can all ready see a few pounds coming off the pack. Keep them coming. Thanks to all for the suggestions.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 11:54 AM
Mark, take a look at the energy replacement drinks that are sold at cycling and running shops. Mixing them in your water will not only supplement your calorie burn, but help to maintain your electrolyte balance and allow your body to recover quicker from heavy exercise. I'm taking in freeze-dried stuff for morning and evening, and adding cheese, Costco crumbled bacon, nuts and fruit for modified trail mix, and I'm snacking frequently during the day. Since I'm an "old guy", I also take in plenty of Tylenol and some cognac in a small Platypus bladder. It's nice to have a little thimble-full of something while I'm hovering over my spotting scope in the evenings!


A guy who was camping at the site I was at last fall had some Patron Anejo... I'd only had Jose Quervo before then, yack... That Patron is some good stuff.

I didn't take anything up with me, but a little bit of that went a long way to take the edge off. I will be including that this year.

For those of you that have used the Wilderness Athlete, is it a big enough improvement over Gatorade to justify the additional cost?

I did see that they have meal replacement shakes, but they only come in a bucket, so not very useful for taking along. I could make multiple single-serving bags, but I've typically found that they don't hold up well after a couple of days - moisture gets in, they spill, etc.

Thoughts?

Elk Hunter
06-06-2013, 12:05 PM
The Live Strong website tells you figure out your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories your body requires just to stay alive. They then have other charts that help you get an idea of how many additional calories your body will burn based on the type and level of activity that you're doing.

I do know that military mountain and artic warfare rations are designed to supply 3000 - 4000 calories per day.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/259763-how-to-calculate-daily-energy-expenditure/

Thank you for the link JMSZ. Looks like I need about 3000 calories/day, with approximately half carbohydrates and the remainder split between protein and fat. I'm going to try it this year.

Elk Hunter
06-06-2013, 12:10 PM
I've typically found that they don't hold up well after a couple of days - moisture gets in, they spill, etc.

Thoughts?

I use ziplock bags and I take a few extra just in case. No problems but then everything is in a bear canister. I keep the bear canister full with anything not needed on the trail as needed to minimize shifting.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 12:29 PM
I use ziplock bags and I take a few extra just in case. No problems but then everything is in a bear canister. I keep the bear canister full with anything not needed on the trail as needed to minimize shifting.

That reminds me, I was going to ask - Where do you keep the stuff that you eat on the trail during the day?

My question pertains to bears, etc. Does everything that comes in contact with food (including your clothes) go in your bear bag/canister or do you just stuff your snacks in the pocket of your coat and hope a bear doesn't come into your tent looking for your goodies?

I picked up some OpSacks, same company that makes the aLockSacks (sp?), I'll use those along with a bear bag as insurance.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 12:36 PM
This has turned into a great thread!! I have gotten a lot of great ideas and some great suggestions. Tough to change older ways but I will definitely make some changes. I am really trying to lighten the load yet get keep the nutritional value. I can all ready see a few pounds coming off the pack. Keep them coming. Thanks to all for the suggestions.

In case you're considering instant noodles and looking for options besides Top Ramen, here's the kind that I take, it's the Korean spicy kind.

http://www.amazon.com/Nongshim-Shin-Noodle-2-64-Ounce-Packages/dp/B000LQNK6E/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1370542760&sr=8-6&keywords=shin+ramyun

Graylight
06-06-2013, 01:04 PM
For those of you that have used the Wilderness Athlete, is it a big enough improvement over Gatorade to justify the additional cost?

The biggest factor here will simply be the glucosamine for joint and muscle recovery. The sweeteners they use are all natural and taste good, without the dye that Gatorade uses. WA also replaces the salts and electrolytes I need with the glucosamine which is what makes it a great chioce. Gatorade alone, will not meet all of your bodies needs.

I have no use for their protein pak's - They are not what I want to choke down on a backpack hunt. Kippered herring snacks in the pulltab can are good energy foods, however that is separate from what the WA drink mix does.

A lot of people like the other powdered/drop drink mixes like Mio and crystal light, however those do nothing more than add flavor. You need to replace nutrients, not watch calories when it comes to hydration.

After the third to fourth day, the sleep will get MUCH better. It takes time for your red blood cell count to raise enough to handle the decreased oxygen absorption rates. After a week, you should be completely out of the woods and feeling pretty good, however, that just so happens to coincide at a time when your body is about done from the vertical hikes every day covering ground.... THAT is where the WA drink mix will save your butt.

Elk Hunter
06-06-2013, 02:47 PM
That reminds me, I was going to ask - Where do you keep the stuff that you eat on the trail during the day?

My question pertains to bears, etc. Does everything that comes in contact with food (including your clothes) go in your bear bag/canister or do you just stuff your snacks in the pocket of your coat and hope a bear doesn't come into your tent looking for your goodies?

I picked up some OpSacks, same company that makes the aLockSacks (sp?), I'll use those along with a bear bag as insurance.

Good question. It would seem to defeat the purpose of using a bear canister if your carrying your snacks in your side pocket all day. Trash, toothpaste, snacks and all go in the bear canister, but not my clothing or my backpack. Hopefully their nose is sharp enough to detect the strongest food smell that poses the least amount of risk.

I don't see the bear canister as being a guarantee of no bear encounters. The biggest advantage I see is that if you are three days from anywhere thats going to become three days from anywhere without food if a bear does get it. Trees can't always be depended on to be where you need them either so it saves that hassle. I don't want to say anything that would cause anyone to let their guard down but I feel that the biggest problem would be in campgrounds where bears have become familiar with the presence of people and see them as a source of food. I have heard in the boundary waters bears have visually gone after backpacks with people in them because they have learned that is where the food is. I do sleep with at least a flashlight, bear spray and air horn, and if I am solo, a 357. I also don't travel far from my tent to urinate. Only once have I heard a bear. He took one sniff/snort next to my tent, which woke me up, and left. If I could smell me after a few days on the trail I would probably do the same. Based on my experience to date I would say being trampled by a herd of elk would be the biggest threat.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 03:25 PM
Good question. It would seem to defeat the purpose of using a bear canister if your carrying your snacks in your side pocket all day. Trash, toothpaste, snacks and all go in the bear canister, but not my clothing or my backpack. Hopefully their nose is sharp enough to detect the strongest food smell that poses the least amount of risk.

I don't see the bear canister as being a guarantee of no bear encounters. The biggest advantage I see is that if you are three days from anywhere thats going to become three days from anywhere without food if a bear does get it. Trees can't always be depended on to be where you need them either so it saves that hassle. I don't want to say anything that would cause anyone to let their guard down but I feel that the biggest problem would be in campgrounds where bears have become familiar with the presence of people and see them as a source of food. I have heard in the boundary waters bears have visually gone after backpacks with people in them because they have learned that is where the food is. I do sleep with at least a flashlight, bear spray and air horn, and if I am solo, a 357. I also don't travel far from my tent to urinate. Only once have I heard a bear. He took one sniff/snort next to my tent, which woke me up, and left. If I could smell me after a few days on the trail I would probably do the same. Based on my experience to date I would say being trampled by a herd of elk would be the biggest threat.


That's why I'm going to do the OpSacks and the bear bag - the sacks are supposed to prevent any odors from getting out, but just in case, hopefully hanging the bag will keep the bear away from my food, but more importantly, it will keep the bear from coming to into my tent looking for food.

I'm wondering about the snacks as far where to put them. I don't want to have to drop my pack every time I want a snack, but I don't want to have to hang my coat every night, either.

I have some pouches that go on the waist belt of my ruck, so the more I think about it, the more I'm leaning towards keeping my snacks for the day in those, bringing a small block and tackle and just hanging my ruck.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 03:28 PM
The biggest factor here will simply be the glucosamine for joint and muscle recovery. The sweeteners they use are all natural and taste good, without the dye that Gatorade uses. WA also replaces the salts and electrolytes I need with the glucosamine which is what makes it a great chioce. Gatorade alone, will not meet all of your bodies needs.

I have no use for their protein pak's - They are not what I want to choke down on a backpack hunt. Kippered herring snacks in the pulltab can are good energy foods, however that is separate from what the WA drink mix does.

A lot of people like the other powdered/drop drink mixes like Mio and crystal light, however those do nothing more than add flavor. You need to replace nutrients, not watch calories when it comes to hydration.

After the third to fourth day, the sleep will get MUCH better. It takes time for your red blood cell count to raise enough to handle the decreased oxygen absorption rates. After a week, you should be completely out of the woods and feeling pretty good, however, that just so happens to coincide at a time when your body is about done from the vertical hikes every day covering ground.... THAT is where the WA drink mix will save your butt.

That's good to hear. I also got a better pad, which will help with the back pain. I can actually sleep on my side on it (Synmat 9), plus it's got the insulation, which should also help.

I'm guessing that, in the end, getting gatorade and glucosamine pills would probably end up costing the same as the WA powder would.

How does that stuff taste and do you know if any stores sell individual packs?

And have you tried their meal replacement shakes? I'm think something like that might be good mixed in with the Carnation instant breakfast.

Elk Hunter
06-06-2013, 03:52 PM
The ruck idea sounds good. Have to check out the OpSacks. Keep in mind you will still have the snacks out during the day and that smell or the smell of dinner will be on you. Even the smell of deodorant will attract them. Also, cooking/eating meals a safe distance from the tent is a good idea. Review the rules for backpacking/camping in Yellowstone or Glacier. They may seem a little fanatical, but gives you some ideas to think about. If there has ever been food in a container they want you to put it inside your vehicle, which won't stop a bear if he wants it. Taking all the precautions is good, but have a plan should one decide to check you out anyway.

JMSZ
06-06-2013, 04:47 PM
The ruck idea sounds good. Have to check out the OpSacks. Keep in mind you will still have the snacks out during the day and that smell or the smell of dinner will be on you. Even the smell of deodorant will attract them. Also, cooking/eating meals a safe distance from the tent is a good idea. Review the rules for backpacking/camping in Yellowstone or Glacier. They may seem a little fanatical, but gives you some ideas to think about. If there has ever been food in a container they want you to put it inside your vehicle, which won't stop a bear if he wants it. Taking all the precautions is good, but have a plan should one decide to check you out anyway.

here's the link to the company that makes the sacks: http://www.loksak.com/products/aloksak

Understand about the smell on me. I'd say that I'd wash regularly, but from what I've read, anything that doesn't smell normal will get their attention and draw them in, so hand sanitizer or soap could be just as likely to draw them in.

That's why I also have a .45 with me and bear spray.

I've considering various methods of setting up an alarm or deterrent system, fishing line and bells or something. Preferably something that will alert me to their presence and even better if it scares them off in the process.

Something like this: http://www.electronicsurplus.com/item/6276/

Here's a video of a similar one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFz3yL7cTvk

Run 4 or 5 of those with trip wires and you should be able to provide 360 degree coverage around your tent. I think the noise and light would be enough to scare most bears (or anything else) away.

25contender
06-06-2013, 04:56 PM
I use the bear bag and hunting areas with bear for the past 26 years ( Dang that seems like a long time!!) I haven't had any issues with bears in camp. I am more worried about Moose coming through the camp than a bear. I have had a few close calls at night with moose during the night in camp and they are not afraid of anything especially at night. Mark

Elk Hunter
06-06-2013, 04:59 PM
Never tried one but I have been told that protable electric fences work great. Not familiar with this one but shows what I am talking about.

http://www.udap.com/bearshock.htm

25contender
06-06-2013, 05:06 PM
Never tried one but I have been told that protable electric fences work great. Not familiar with this one but shows what I am talking about.

http://www.udap.com/bearshock.htm
I would probably forget about the fence about 3am and well you get the picture!! It wouldnt be pretty!

Graylight
06-06-2013, 05:12 PM
IF you are above timber, you will VERY rarely have any issues with bears. i,e, high country muley hunts in September...

To answer the question in regards to the WA shakes - I have not utilized them, so I have little input. As far as the WA Hydrate and Recover, it comes in a flavor called Berry Blast... It's not bad - Granted, it is not as sweet as Gatorade but it goes down fine. Considering the benefits, I love it.

Once upon a time, WA gave us a ton of their product that I would have otherwise never purchased or utilized. After using the Hydrate and recover powder, I am sold and will continue to buy it into the future. Just as a FYI - I am not trying to sell this product or help push the stuff. Simply put, it works well for me and my friends who use it.

Elk Hunter
06-06-2013, 06:36 PM
I would probably forget about the fence about 3am and well you get the picture!! It wouldnt be pretty!

Yeah, but you would probably only do it once.

JMSZ
06-08-2013, 07:08 PM
I use the bear bag and hunting areas with bear for the past 26 years ( Dang that seems like a long time!!) I haven't had any issues with bears in camp. I am more worried about Moose coming through the camp than a bear. I have had a few close calls at night with moose during the night in camp and they are not afraid of anything especially at night. Mark

Do you take bear spray with you?

When considering this, on the one hand, I like to ere on the side of safety, on the other hand, I figure that people have been hunting, ranching, herding and camping up in the mountains for decades and, while there have been occasional problems, it obviously hasn't been enough to stop people from doing it.

Being a firm believer in Murphy and his antics, I just worry that now, if I decide not to get anything, he'll make me number 1,000,000.

25contender
06-08-2013, 07:36 PM
Yes sir I keep a can close by. Like they say better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.


Do you take bear spray with you?

When considering this, on the one hand, I like to ere on the side of safety, on the other hand, I figure that people have been hunting, ranching, herding and camping up in the mountains for decades and, while there have been occasional problems, it obviously hasn't been enough to stop people from doing it.

Being a firm believer in Murphy and his antics, I just worry that now, if I decide not to get anything, he'll make me number 1,000,000.

JMSZ
06-08-2013, 07:50 PM
IF you are above timber, you will VERY rarely have any issues with bears. i,e, high country muley hunts in September...

To answer the question in regards to the WA shakes - I have not utilized them, so I have little input. As far as the WA Hydrate and Recover, it comes in a flavor called Berry Blast... It's not bad - Granted, it is not as sweet as Gatorade but it goes down fine. Considering the benefits, I love it.

Once upon a time, WA gave us a ton of their product that I would have otherwise never purchased or utilized. After using the Hydrate and recover powder, I am sold and will continue to buy it into the future. Just as a FYI - I am not trying to sell this product or help push the stuff. Simply put, it works well for me and my friends who use it.

My base camp will be relatively low (8000ish feet) and I'll be hoofing it into where I hunt, so I'll be in the timber to start out. I need to scout one area I want to hunt this fall, it gets pretty high, but I think most of it will be in timber, with just a few high spots.

Thanks for the info on the Wilderness Athlete, I'll try some.

Montana
06-09-2013, 09:17 AM
That would be great . It would be nice to see your breakdown. I like the point about not running out of juice. I have been there and done that!! Thanks Mark e-mail archerm@aol.com

Sorry for the delay... Just emailed. It's titled "Goal to 40" if it gets spammed.

25contender
06-09-2013, 10:37 AM
I received it Scott. Thanks again. Mark

clacklin009
06-09-2013, 04:47 PM
So I just went through all the posts and have gathered a few thoughts on the subject off calorie count for packing in.

1. I feel bad for the guys that lose their appetite while out.
2. I love GU products. I use Gels, Chomps, and Roctane powder to add to water. I think these guys are the best in the business. I'm a diabetic and I have always needed to take lots of sugar for quick help when my blood drops. GU has saved me because I would get sick from all the sugar stuff I would have to eat, now I just take a gel and I feel it kick in instantly. They have different mixtures of sugars that act at different times so the digestion isn't taking place all at the same time, but I still get instant energy.
3. I eat Tigers Milk protein bars. Don't think these guys are the best in the business but I like eating the bars.
4. I have been using MRE's because I like the main dish but I'm lucky if I eat 1/2 of the other stuff in the package so I've decided to not take them any more. Can you buy just the main dish? I'm using a stove and mountain housing it. Previously I have taken sticks of pepperoni but have stopped taking any smelly meat product. I figure if they could smell me before the snack, after the snack I have not helped my cause.
5. I love meat sandwiches but sandwiches don't travel well for me without packing containers that take up space. Any ideas?
6. I hate bears. I call the ranger station each year before I go out and ask if there have been any bear reports. No reports since 20 years ago but I still call. Carrying a .357 or .40 is very heavy but have to do it.
7. I thought I packed a lot of stuff in the back country in my 100 L pack, but it doesn't sound like I compare to what some of you guys are taking.
.

JMSZ
06-09-2013, 07:06 PM
So I just went through all the posts and have gathered a few thoughts on the subject off calorie count for packing in.

1. I feel bad for the guys that lose their appetite while out.
2. I love GU products. I use Gels, Chomps, and Roctane powder to add to water. I think these guys are the best in the business. I'm a diabetic and I have always needs to take lots of sugar for quick help when my blood drops. GU has saved me I would get sick from all the stuff I would have to eat, now I just take a gel and I feel it kick in instantly. They have different mixtures of sugars take act differently.
3. I eat Tigers Milk protein bars. Don't think these guys are the best in the business but I like eating the bars.
4. I have been using MRE's because I like the main dish but I'm lucky if I eat 1/2 of the other stuff in the package so I've decided to not take them any more. Can you buy just the main dish? I'm using a stove and mountain housing it. Use to take sticks of pepperoni but have stopped taking any smelly meat product. I figure if they could smell me before the snack, after the snack I have not helped my cause.
5. I love meat sandwiches but sandwiches don't travel well for me without packing containers that take up space. Any ideas?
6. I hate bears. I call the ranger station each year before I go out and ask if there have been any bear reports. No reports since 20 years ago but I still call. Carrying a .357 or .40 is very heavy but have to do it.
7. I thought I packed a lot of stuff in the back country in my 100 L pack, but it doesn't sound like I compare to what some of you guys are taking.
.


What's GU?

I've been looking for individual MRE components, but I haven't had much luck. I see them occasionally, but they're usually from some "survivalist" or somebody's garage business and there's no way to know where, when and why they got them.

I've found manufacturers websites, but none seem to sell components to individuals. One that I found that is in Singapore actually makes a bunch of stuff, including Kosher and Halal food that are typically curries and such, as well as the standard kind of stuff. I'm going to look into it at some point, but I'm guessing I'd have to have a decent size order before they'd talk to me.

The one exception I have found, and that answers another of your questions, is Bridgford sandwiches, they make sandwiches for the MREs. I like them, I put a post on here about them, but if you call them, they'll send you two different sandwiches as samples.

Montana
06-09-2013, 10:08 PM
I received it Scott. Thanks again. Mark

No worries hope it works. Look forward in seeing what you put together. I just packed for my 4 day bear trip and pretty happy with the total pack weight coming in at 28 pds not including rifle or tent. Buddy and i are splitting tent/poles.

MacDonald
06-11-2013, 07:15 PM
Another thought that might be of some importance; try your food before you head out. it'd be "bad form" to get the runs from some freeze-dried meal you haven't had before! Another issue is hydration. Our instructors used to tell us "if you don't have to piss, you're not drinking enough". It'll help immensely with acclimating.

I always pack in a little Platypus bladder with some good scotch for that "evening nip". that and a couple of Tylenol before sacking out, and it really makes the day nicer! Besides, it's supposed to be a vacation, right? I sure do miss a good cigar to go with the drink, though.:(

Montana
06-12-2013, 05:31 AM
I have a question... Is it best to take Dr tylenol before going to bed or when you wake up the nextt morning?

25contender
06-12-2013, 06:28 AM
I do two Advil first thing in the morning myself. I didn't have to when I was a little younger. Now days it makes a huge difference as the day goes on.

tttoadman
06-12-2013, 06:31 AM
Another thought that might be of some importance; try your food before you head out. it'd be "bad form" to get the runs from some freeze-dried meal you haven't had before! Another issue is hydration. Our instructors used to tell us "if you don't have to piss, you're not drinking enough". It'll help immensely with acclimating.

I always pack in a little Platypus bladder with some good scotch for that "evening nip". that and a couple of Tylenol before sacking out, and it really makes the day nicer! Besides, it's supposed to be a vacation, right? I sure do miss a good cigar to go with the drink, though.:(

X2 on trying the food stuff out.

If I took my vodka of choice with me, it would likely burn its way through the bladder container and/or be gone long before the first night came along.

25contender
06-17-2013, 08:42 PM
Been working hard on getting my 5-7 day pack weight down but it is tough!! Looks like with everything including food and two water bladders full to start the trip in the weight is going to be between 50-60 lbs.
I have shed right at 10 lbs 7 of it in the food category.

tttoadman
06-17-2013, 10:19 PM
I just covered some miles with the new pack, new insoles, new merino socks, and some really good food that all of you guys have been noting.

I am totally sold on the honey stinger waffles and chocolate bars. I took some GU chomps and that was also just right. I tried the black cherry almond clif bars and u won't get any of the others anymore.

I had 4400 cal in 2.5lbs. I think that is a good start. I noticed doing the mountain house is pretty efficient, but the numbers get bad if you only go for a couple days. If you took the weight of the stove and fuel over a 7 day span, it starts to make good cal/lb.

I have never used a water bladder. I don't understand how everybody has these inside the pack and then compress the pack. Do you just strap it to the outside? Do you get a separate scope bag to put a water bladder in?

25contender
06-18-2013, 06:42 AM
I just covered some miles with the new pack, new insoles, new merino socks, and some really good food that all of you guys have been noting.

I am totally sold on the honey stinger waffles and chocolate bars. I took some GU chomps and that was also just right. I tried the black cherry almond clif bars and u won't get any of the others anymore.

I had 4400 cal in 2.5lbs. I think that is a good start. I noticed doing the mountain house is pretty efficient, but the numbers get bad if you only go for a couple days. If you took the weight of the stove and fuel over a 7 day span, it starts to make good cal/lb.

I have never used a water bladder. I don't understand how everybody has these inside the pack and then compress the pack. Do you just strap it to the outside? Do you get a separate scope bag to put a water bladder in?

I can put a large bladder or two smaller bladders in a kipped compartment on top of my pack. Compression doesn't phase them being on top. I opt for the two smaller bladders because I use one bladder in my day pack and leave the other at camp. It looks like I will be repacking the food items in daily bags to make life a Little easier and faster while at camp or out hunting. I am going to try shooting for 3000 calories a day for seven days at 15lbs max which will be about 4 lbs lighter than my old food numbers. Mark

JMSZ
06-18-2013, 10:20 AM
I just covered some miles with the new pack, new insoles, new merino socks, and some really good food that all of you guys have been noting.

I am totally sold on the honey stinger waffles and chocolate bars. I took some GU chomps and that was also just right. I tried the black cherry almond clif bars and u won't get any of the others anymore.

I had 4400 cal in 2.5lbs. I think that is a good start. I noticed doing the mountain house is pretty efficient, but the numbers get bad if you only go for a couple days. If you took the weight of the stove and fuel over a 7 day span, it starts to make good cal/lb.

I have never used a water bladder. I don't understand how everybody has these inside the pack and then compress the pack. Do you just strap it to the outside? Do you get a separate scope bag to put a water bladder in?

http://www.specopsbrand.com/tactical-gear/clearance-blow-outs/h-u-m-p-hydration-utility-multiple-platform-olive-drab.html

You can get something like this, you can strap it to your ruck and/or to web gear if you have that.

The closure on this one doesn't use velcro, so it doesn't alert the entire forest to your presence if you need to open it.

Elk Hunter
06-18-2013, 10:29 AM
I have never used a water bladder. I don't understand how everybody has these inside the pack and then compress the pack. Do you just strap it to the outside? Do you get a separate scope bag to put a water bladder in?

Go to the Camelback website. They have a video of a water bladder being repeatedly run over by different vehicles. I believe they are guaranteed for life. I keep mine in the insulated cover that came with it, and I have had no problems. Its at least 10 years old. My hiking buddies remove the insulating cover to save weight and they are always having puncture leaks. Apparently you can squeeze them all you want, just protect from sharp objects. Also be careful not to put the hose in a bind. It will pinch and kink with enough pressure. Once it does it seems to easily kink in that spot again and will need to be replaced.

tttoadman
06-18-2013, 10:57 AM
Go to the Camelback website. They have a video of a water bladder being repeatedly run over by different vehicles. I believe they are guaranteed for life. I keep mine in the insulated cover that came with it, and I have had no problems. Its at least 10 years old. My hiking buddies remove the insulating cover to save weight and they are always having puncture leaks. Apparently you can squeeze them all you want, just protect from sharp objects. Also be careful not to put the hose in a bind. It will pinch and kink with enough pressure. Once it does it seems to easily kink in that spot again and will need to be replaced.

I have one of those with the cover and the hooks on the top. I was concerned about the weight also. That sounds like weight that is worth carrying. I will see how I can get that one hooked into my bag. thanks, Todd

JMSZ
06-18-2013, 10:59 AM
Been working hard on getting my 5-7 day pack weight down but it is tough!! Looks like with everything including food and two water bladders full to start the trip in the weight is going to be between 50-60 lbs.
I have shed right at 10 lbs 7 of it in the food category.

I'm glad to see that I'm not too far out in left field as far as weight. For a 6 day trip, I'm at 70lbs for my pack weight, doesn't include my rifle, pistol, holster, ammunition or what I'm wearing.

25contender
06-18-2013, 11:41 AM
I'm glad to see that I'm not too far out in left field as far as weight. For a 6 day trip, I'm at 70lbs for my pack weight, doesn't include my rifle, pistol, holster, ammunition or what I'm wearing.
I havent included my bow or backpack bow pack yet. The bowholder pack setup for my Mathews Z7 I had made is very light at about 10ozs. I was surprised how much weight I have saved just switching to some different food Items. I was right up there at 70lbs myself for my 7 day pack. As far as the water bladders I have never had any problems with them in the upper part of my pack. I put my extra cloths for cushioning under the bladders.

JMSZ
06-18-2013, 04:16 PM
I havent included my bow or backpack bow pack yet. The bowholder pack setup for my Mathews Z7 I had made is very light at about 10ozs. I was surprised how much weight I have saved just switching to some different food Items. I was right up there at 70lbs myself for my 7 day pack. As far as the water bladders I have never had any problems with them in the upper part of my pack. I put my extra cloths for cushioning under the bladders.

My 70lbs is after scrubbing through everything and trimming weight...But, I carry a lot of stuff - "Better to have and not need than need and not have" philosophy - and I'm not going to shell out a bunch of money for a new ruck(s).

I use an pack on an ALICE frame, I got a pad for the frame that has pouches for the bladders built in and fits in the space between my back and the frame.

I'll use the drinking tubes depending on what I'm doing, some times they just get in the way and it's easier to use my nalgene bottles.

tttoadman
06-18-2013, 05:43 PM
http://www.specopsbrand.com/tactical-gear/clearance-blow-outs/h-u-m-p-hydration-utility-multiple-platform-olive-drab.html

You can get something like this, you can strap it to your ruck and/or to web gear if you have that.

The closure on this one doesn't use velcro, so it doesn't alert the entire forest to your presence if you need to open it.

that is so simple!! I think a couple of those could be it for water and food for the initial pack in.

25contender
07-03-2013, 06:28 PM
Weighed everything and looks like 65lbs for my seven day pack. That includes my bow 2qts of water to start and a 15lb food pack. I don't think I can get it down anymore for seven days. I will look at my list to see what I can do without. Its tough getting it less than that. Mark

trkytrack2
07-03-2013, 10:26 PM
If you have interest I can email you my spreadsheet. I have a breakdown that has calorie count, weight, sodium, carb, and protein count as I felt those were the most important categories. I make myself eat 5 times a day and at certain times, it may just be a cliff bar at 10:30 but I watch the clock and stick to it. Never know when it will turn to go time and I don't want to run out of juice.
That would help a lot here. I'm introducing three teenagers to the glory of bowhunting elk in the back country this September and need all the help I can find.
Email: trkytrack@gmail.com

trkytrack2
07-03-2013, 11:19 PM
I'm also diabetic (type 1...insulin dependent). This will be my first year to really get away from my "safe zone"; my truck base camp. What do you, as a diabetic, pack for food and snacks? I have to keep my blood sugar levels pretty consistent. If not, it really throws me for a loop. Finding packable foods, low in sugar, is really difficult. I've gone the sugar free oatmeal for breakfasts; tuna and crackers for the lunch/dinner route but most of the snack/energy bars are all high in sugar content. Has anyone else with the diabetes curse found any answers?

tttoadman
07-03-2013, 11:47 PM
Weighed everything and looks like 65lbs for my seven day pack. That includes my bow 2qts of water to start and a 15lb food pack. I don't think I can get it down anymore for seven days. I will look at my list to see what I can do without. Its tough getting it less than that. Mark

This may seem obvious, but don't give up a backup light source. I was trying to skimp last year and left my old heavy headlamp behind. I think the new lights with LED are pretty reliable. I was about 3 miles from camp. I was wet and cold and it was down around 15deg. It took me 15 minutes to delicately change the batteries in my headlamp in the dark without losing something. I will be taking one of those mini keychain lights to use as a backup, or getting another peitz(spelling) that I can also wear on my wrist.

Please don't everybody point out the obvious that I should have freshened up my light "before" it got dark. I won't make that mistake again.

Sorry for stepping a little off food topic, but that is one of the only times I was worried about not getting out, so I thought I would throw that out.

25contender
07-04-2013, 08:05 AM
This may seem obvious, but don't give up a backup light source. I was trying to skimp last year and left my old heavy headlamp behind. I think the new lights with LED are pretty reliable. I was about 3 miles from camp. I was wet and cold and it was down around 15deg. It took me 15 minutes to delicately change the batteries in my headlamp in the dark without losing something. I will be taking one of those mini keychain lights to use as a backup, or getting another peitz(spelling) that I can also wear on my wrist.

Please don't everybody point out the obvious that I should have freshened up my light "before" it got dark. I won't make that mistake again.

Sorry for stepping a little off food topic, but that is one of the only times I was worried about not getting out, so I thought I would throw that out.

I sure don't skimp on the light, I understand what you are saying. I carry a Streamlight 14512 @5.6 oz and a mini Maglite as well. I also carry enough Batteries as well. The 65lb pack is the in and out Pack and once I am in and have camp set I will loose at least 50% of that weight and go to day pack mode until I decide to change my camp location.

25contender
07-04-2013, 08:24 AM
I am glad you mentioned this. Though I am not a Diabetic my long time hunting partner was. He had diabetes since he was 11. The sad part was he couldn't get any of his "Friends" to go with him on multi-day trips. I had no problems going with him. It was pretty simple. He kept his Kit and insulin in a pocket in his vest so the insulin wouldn't freeze. He also kept a backup kit and insulin in the truck. When we first hunting together over 20 years ago he showed me what to do in case his sugar level crashed. He also kept instructions in his kit for me. In his kit he kept his emergency Glucose Gel squeeze packets as well as his other essentials for diabetes. Luckily in those twenty years he never crashed and was extremely good about knowing when he needed to eat to get his sugar level back to where it needed to be. I was always prepared to do what it took to get him back on line if something happened.He always carried Snickers Bars and a box or two of those small juices. He was a firm believer that he needed to know what his body needed at all times.
I'm also diabetic (type 1...insulin dependent). This will be my first year to really get away from my "safe zone"; my truck base camp. What do you, as a diabetic, pack for food and snacks? I have to keep my blood sugar levels pretty consistent. If not, it really throws me for a loop. Finding packable foods, low in sugar, is really difficult. I've gone the sugar free oatmeal for breakfasts; tuna and crackers for the lunch/dinner route but most of the snack/energy bars are all high in sugar content. Has anyone else with the diabetes curse found any answers?

az.mountain runner
07-07-2013, 06:22 PM
Maybe too late to post this but On the WA issue , on my #2 page post, I have used most of their products, and I'm not pushing them either, the shake stuff I would not use in the field, but their energy and recovery drinks r great ,taste is not bad , I like their bars, I use their product every elk tag I draw , and they will b in my backpack this fall

Outdoors
07-19-2013, 01:23 PM
Check out Hammer Nutrition @ hammernutrition.com. By far the best endurance fuels out there and produced locally in Montana. I pack their HEED, Hammer Gels (like tasty rocket fuel), pbj & pbh sandwiches, oatmeal with protein powder, nuts & dried fruits & peanut butter energy balls (if the wife makes em). Seems to be a pretty good combo for me. Daily count of 3,000 give or take.

JMSZ
07-31-2013, 10:33 AM
So, a related issue - I'm at about 2.1 pounds per day for 3600 calories, but I'm wondering what you guys are spending.

Mine's coming out to about $30 a day. I'm doing all prepackaged, so I understand it's going to cost more, but I'm just wondering if I'm way out in left field.

Just curious about what you guys are spending.

I may make up some stuff at home, but I generally prefer sticking with stuff that is prepackaged, as it's easier to deal with and I don't have to worry about shelf-life issues.

I included my daily food list below in case anybody's interested.

My menu is pretty much the same for every day, I have (or will have) tried everything in my list at least once and like it, so I know I can eat it. More variety would be great, but I consider it a nice-to-have, not a priority.

My priorities, not necessarily in this order, for my food are 1) getting the number of calories I will need, 2) as much ready-to-eat as possible, 3) everything except dinner needs no more preparation than adding water and 4) everything sealed and shelf-stable

Here's my list for food (daily)

BREAKFAST

PACKIT GOURMET FRUIT SMOOTHIE
BRIDGFORD SANDWICH
INSTANT 3-IN-1 COFFEE
INSTANT PLAIN COFFEE

SNACK HONEY STINGER
GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER

EARLY
LUNCH PROBAR
BRIDGFORD SANDWICH
INSTANT 3-IN-1 COFFEE or GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER


SNACK HONEY STINGER
GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER

LATE
LUNCH PROBAR
BRIDGFORD SANDWICH
INSTANT 3-IN-1 COFFEE or GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER


SNACK HONEY STINGER
GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER

DINNER PACKIT GOURMET CHILI - My daily hot meal
INSTANT SPICED CIDER

JMSZ
08-01-2013, 11:25 AM
I found a link to this article on the Backpacking Light forum, it has some good information on planning for food requirements.

http://backpackinglight.typepad.com/2006_arctic/2006/06/on_food_and_coo.html

25contender
08-01-2013, 08:44 PM
So, a related issue - I'm at about 2.1 pounds per day for 3600 calories, but I'm wondering what you guys are spending.

Mine's coming out to about $30 a day. I'm doing all prepackaged, so I understand it's going to cost more, but I'm just wondering if I'm way out in left field.

Just curious about what you guys are spending.

I may make up some stuff at home, but I generally prefer sticking with stuff that is prepackaged, as it's easier to deal with and I don't have to worry about shelf-life issues.

I included my daily food list below in case anybody's interested.

My menu is pretty much the same for every day, I have (or will have) tried everything in my list at least once and like it, so I know I can eat it. More variety would be great, but I consider it a nice-to-have, not a priority.

My priorities, not necessarily in this order, for my food are 1) getting the number of calories I will need, 2) as much ready-to-eat as possible, 3) everything except dinner needs no more preparation than adding water and 4) everything sealed and shelf-stable

Here's my list for food (daily)

BREAKFAST

PACKIT GOURMET FRUIT SMOOTHIE
BRIDGFORD SANDWICH
INSTANT 3-IN-1 COFFEE
INSTANT PLAIN COFFEE

SNACK HONEY STINGER
GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER

EARLY
LUNCH PROBAR
BRIDGFORD SANDWICH
INSTANT 3-IN-1 COFFEE or GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER


SNACK HONEY STINGER
GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER

LATE
LUNCH PROBAR
BRIDGFORD SANDWICH
INSTANT 3-IN-1 COFFEE or GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER


SNACK HONEY STINGER
GATORADE/WILDERNESS ATHLETE POWDER

DINNER PACKIT GOURMET CHILI - My daily hot meal
INSTANT SPICED CIDER

I am just putting together my new meal packs. As soon as I get a list and costs I will post it up. Mark