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howler243
06-19-2013, 06:30 AM
First off i want to thank all the members that helped me on my camp stove question. I was wondering what people are using for water purification in the back country. One of my cousins has the stery pen he said i could use but should i get a pump filter as well. Are the tablets worth bringing. I supose to be safe just bring all four but who has room for that lol. again just looking for some guidence dont want to be buying junk or unnessesary things. Thank you

Fink
06-19-2013, 06:52 AM
I have the steripen, and really liked using it. I think you'll find that most guys use the Katydon pump type filters, but I had zero issues with my steripen. One set of lithium batteries will easily last you for the duration of your trip. I do take some tablets with me, just in case.

25contender
06-19-2013, 07:05 AM
I have used the Katadyn Hiker Pro for years and really like the way it packs in my pack. I also bring some Iodine tablets as a backup. Mark

JMSZ
06-19-2013, 07:41 AM
I have the Sawyer gravity-fed filter system, it's basically a camelback-type of bag with a filter that attaches to the tube. You hang the bag and let it go.

I like it because you don't have to pump it, you can fill the bag, throw it on your pack and when you find a place to take a break, hang it and filter your water. You can actually put the dirty water bag on the top of your ruck and your clean water bag/bottle on the bottom of your ruck and let it go while you're walking around.

Their filter is also a lifetime filter, you run water through it in reverse once in a while to clean it, but that's it.

I modified a piece of drinking tube with a camelback quick disconnect on one end and a Sawyer quick disconnect on the other end so I can hook mine directly up to my camelback bladders using the drinking tube. That way, it's a closed system, so I don't have to sit there with it to ensure that nothing (bugs, leaves, dirt, etc) gets in my clean water bags.

As far as water purification tabs, I still take some along - s**t happens, stuff breaks or gets lost. They're light and relatively inexpensive, so there's no reason why you should be having to choose between dehydration due to lack of water or taking your chances with dirty water. You don't need a month's supply, you just need a couple days worth to get you back to your truck/car/home.

hardstalk
06-19-2013, 07:58 AM
I used just tabs for a couple seasons but the wait time got a bit tedious when your thirsty. I now carry a katadyn pump and tabs just incase.

mgriffith80
06-20-2013, 07:48 AM
I have used the Katadyn Hiker Pro for years and really like the way it packs in my pack. I also bring some Iodine tablets as a backup. Mark
Same for me, Katadyn Pump with tablets as a back up.

Musket Man
06-20-2013, 08:42 AM
I have a Katadyn Hiker Pro too. I have been very happy with it. I do need to get a new filter for it since its getting blocked up.

dhershberger
06-20-2013, 10:06 AM
I'm using a sawyer squeeze filter which is currently the lightest water filter available at only 3oz.! It really is an unbeatable system.

tttoadman
06-20-2013, 02:27 PM
I pack the pump also. thanks everybody for reminding me not to forget the tabs because "#$%&" happens. I usually try to find a weep on a bank and not mess with my pump filter at all. probably a gamble, but I haven't got the bug yet. but now that i have said that........

hoshour
06-20-2013, 02:59 PM
I do the same - a pump with iodine backup. Mine is an MSR pump from REI.

wolftalonID
06-20-2013, 03:26 PM
+++ on the katydon pack pumps. I have been looking at adding a stery pen but not that concerned as the pump works dang well.

Bitterroot Bulls
06-20-2013, 03:51 PM
Water treatment methods:

1) No treatment. Studies have shown in most backcountry areas of the Western US this is pretty safe, and people are far more likely to bring a pathogen into the backcountry than get infected with a pathogen from the backcountry. I don't like this method for peace-of-mind reasons.

2) Classic pump filter. I have had several Katadyns. They don't work on viruses, and there is some debate whether they do much on other pathogens. They are heavier, and will break with use. They are better for filtering larger amounts of water than some other methods, but pumping sucks.

3) "Flow" filters (Sawyer, etc.). I have these too, and like that they are at least as effective as a traditional filter and easier to use. I really like the inline filters because you can just dip your bladder and drink as you go. Downsides are similar to regular filters, but the biggest drawback is they WILL freeze in the cold and break, so cold weather use is limited.

4) Drops/tablets. They are ultralight and convenient. I don't like the wait times or the taste of some methods.

5) UV Treatment. I have a steripen and this is my favorite method for areas with a lot of water, because I can save weight by only taking a quart at a time, and filling as I go. It is quick and easy. It deactivates everything, including viruses. You do need pretty clear water and you depend on batteries. Works in the cold.

6) Boiling. By far the safest method. It is slow, and you end up with really hot water. It takes fuel to do it.

My .02

slim jim
06-20-2013, 04:52 PM
Sawyer filter with tabs for backup. Lightweight and effective. When I hunt in freezing temps I wrap the sawyer filter with a clothing item and stuff in pack. Haven't had one crack yet but I don't hunt in the extreme frigid temps of the far north either

clacklin009
06-20-2013, 10:27 PM
I use the Katadyn Hiker Pro and the Katadyn water bottle. They will get rid of the bacteria, viruses, cysts and will improve the taste of the water. Pens treat the stuff but it stays in the water, they don't remove dirt, and the water needs to be clear for them to work. If you want to use tablets I'd go with the Katadyn Micropur tablets they are the only EPA registered tablets that kill all microorganisms to the EPA standard including Cryptosporidium.

JMSZ
06-21-2013, 02:44 PM
Water treatment methods:

1) No treatment. Studies have shown in most backcountry areas of the Western US this is pretty safe, and people are far more likely to bring a pathogen into the backcountry than get infected with a pathogen from the backcountry. I don't like this method for peace-of-mind reasons.

2) Classic pump filter. I have had several Katadyns. They don't work on viruses, and there is some debate whether they do much on other pathogens. They are heavier, and will break with use. They are better for filtering larger amounts of water than some other methods, but pumping sucks.

3) "Flow" filters (Sawyer, etc.). I have these too, and like that they are at least as effective as a traditional filter and easier to use. I really like the inline filters because you can just dip your bladder and drink as you go. Downsides are similar to regular filters, but the biggest drawback is they WILL freeze in the cold and break, so cold weather use is limited.

4) Drops/tablets. They are ultralight and convenient. I don't like the wait times or the taste of some methods.

5) UV Treatment. I have a steripen and this is my favorite method for areas with a lot of water, because I can save weight by only taking a quart at a time, and filling as I go. It is quick and easy. It deactivates everything, including viruses. You do need pretty clear water and you depend on batteries. Works in the cold.

6) Boiling. By far the safest method. It is slow, and you end up with really hot water. It takes fuel to do it.

My .02

Sawyer actually recommends sleeping with it in your bag to keep it from freezing... I'm going the same route as slim jim and wrapping it good and keeping it in the tent with me.

In God We Trust
06-21-2013, 06:39 PM
I have been using the MSR hyperflow for 5 years and it is a great way to treat water in the back country. I recomend this pump to people but it is the only one I have used.

sagehunter
06-25-2013, 05:02 PM
I have a MSR pump which is great. I used the iodine tablets one year to save weight but didnt like wait half hour to drink.

ID_MW
06-25-2013, 06:30 PM
Steripen is a great lightweight and rapid working product, but I have experienced problems with it in the cold. I learned the hard way that you should take the batteries out and stick them in your pocket between uses, or keep the whole unit in a insulated pocket. The steripen is awesome when you know you will be encountering clear water sources, like mountain streams or lake water. For turbid water sources, like ones encountered in a lot of desert environments, the pump style or filtered products are really nice, and worth the extra weight- unless you are cool with slimy/gritty brown water in your mouth (yuck). I will also always have some chlorine dioxide tablets just in case- these are so lightweight and packable it is almost a no-brainer. Of all the topics on this great forum, I think that back country hydration is one of, if not THE most important aspect of a hunters preparation for a back country outing. Best of luck on your upcoming back country hunts.

Huntography
06-25-2013, 10:26 PM
Will be using my Geigerrig with inline filter on all archery elk season in Colorado.

Works really well.

Rudy

MacDonald
06-26-2013, 09:53 PM
We used iodine tabs in the service, and today the smell of iodine will make me puke!. I'm hunting the high country, so this season I'll haul a steripen along with some Aquamira tablets, but I'll also take along some pieces of cheesecloth to put over the mouth of the container to act as a "large object" screen.

Colorado Cowboy
06-28-2013, 12:20 AM
Water treatment methods:

1) No treatment. Studies have shown in most backcountry areas of the Western US this is pretty safe, and people are far more likely to bring a pathogen into the backcountry than get infected with a pathogen from the backcountry. I don't like this method for peace-of-mind reasons.




I guess I'm old fashioned and yes I'm just old too. But I really don't use much in the way of filters, treatment and such in my backcountry water consumption. First of all I won't use water from areas that have livestock there. I will only use water from sources that run freely in gravel, rocky stream beds, preferably as close to their source as possible. I am pretty picky about where I camp and what water I use. I don't ever remember being sick that could be attributed to the water I drank. Just my take....

RckyMtnNative
07-01-2013, 10:46 PM
Lot’s of great info on this thread from previous posts. I myself have switched to using AquaMira for almost all of my backcountry trips later in the season in areas where I know I’ll have regular clear water sources. It does take some time, but 30 minutes always seems to fly by for me in the backcountry. If you’re looking to cut ounces from your pack, it’s one of the best options in my opinion. A full two bottle set (it’s a 2 part system that will treat up to 30 gallons) of AquaMira is only 2.8 ounces compared to 14.6 ounces for the Katadyn Pro Hiker (these are the weights I recorded from my Pelouze digital scale). And to me the taste is unrecognizable. I still use the Katadyn Pro-Hiker during early season when there’s runoff or if I’m unfamiliar with the water sources in the area since the filter is nice to have for murky or muddy water. Either way, you can’t go wrong. I use the liquid AquaMira (haven’t tried the tablets yet).

gretch6364
08-21-2013, 02:09 PM
I also am 100% Aquamira liquid. Never been sick and I think it improves the taste of the water. We always fill up our bottles at night or in the morning...and fill back up throughout the day before you run out of water. I am in CO, so I know it is different for everyone, and we hunt a valley with lots of springs.

Chippy Hacky
08-23-2013, 11:31 AM
I go with the Sawyer Squeeze, it is light and compact but it takes some time and your hands get wet. I never had a problem with it freezing but the heat off my back (while it is in the pack) probably helps. The bladder(s) can also be used for extra water storage which has come in handy.

trkytrack2
08-23-2013, 07:55 PM
I'd like to hear from somebody that "has gotten the bug" from drinking bad water while out in the backcountry. Does it come on fast or is it one of those get sick after you get back home?

Bitterroot Bulls
08-23-2013, 08:32 PM
tt2,

I haven't gotten it myself, but here is what the CDC says:

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/giardia/gen_info/faqs.html

Incubation takes 1 - 3 weeks. Most folks are out of the woods (so to speak) when it hits them.

wapiti66
08-23-2013, 09:15 PM
Giardia sounds very bad. But, I have drank from a stream only after I watched another person who drinks from that same stream every year without any problems. If it's been tried and tested I will probably drink the water if it is flowing good. If I am unsure I use the Iodine tablets...
1)Very inexpensive way to cut weight
2)saves a lot of space
3)I don't mind the taste, and usually add Emergen-C powder

Just a thought: To deal with the wait, I'd try to replenish my supply of water before I have run completely out even though that means carrying some extra weight I like to drink a lot so Im willing to lug extra water to be safe. I guess instead of carrying the weight of a filter carry that extra weight in water and haul similar weight? that's a lot of waits/weights haha

Chippy Hacky
08-24-2013, 09:18 AM
There is not much better then drinking from a high mountain stream. I don't think I could get myself to put some kind of tablet in the water, that's just me though. If I have to drink out of a pond or something, maybe, but a stream, I am taking the chance. Everything I have read suggests that it is very unlikely to get something and I have never gotten anything.

Just think about all of those guys 20-70+ years ago, our fathers and grandfathers. They never put tablets in water, they didn't filter it either. I carry a filter for when something looks iffy.

AT Hiker
08-30-2013, 05:10 PM
I filter everything with my hiker pro, if you dont have a treatment system you better get the water from the source and pray..I actually pray when using a filter too! Technically viruses cannot be filtered, but a .2 micron filter of the hiker pro (or other similar size filters) works pretty good. The theory is viruses attach themselves to larger particles and is therefore filtered through your filter.

The "bug" usually affects you when you get home, but if you get it while in the backcountry you are in a heap of trouble. I seen someone get carried out of the Appalachian Mountains that had it, dehydration was a understatement.

jjenness
08-30-2013, 09:52 PM
Back in 2007 my hunting partner and I were packing in around 6 miles into the wilderness out of the Cinnabar Basin, north of Gardner MT, for an archery elk hunt. We had hunted the area before and we always drank right out of a stream that was about 2 miles in. Just like in the past we drank from the stream, only this time something wasn't right. By nightfall I had a raging temp, chills, vomiting, diareaha, and a splitting headache. We hastily made a camp in less than ideal terrain and I proceeded to eat every single medication in both of our first aid packs. I have never in my life thought that an illness in the backcountry was going to come so close to killing me. We woke up the next morning and my temp had broke but I still wasn't feeling to well. We hunted the morning and then decided we needed to head out. To top it all off we ran into a young griz at 10 yds on the hike out. Learned a lot of lessons on that particular hunt, or I guess you could say hike since it only lasted less than 24 hours.

lookinforwater
09-14-2013, 11:41 AM
Have any of you used the katadyn base camp hanging filter. I thought this would be nice to keep at spike camp and fill my camelback up each morning. I had a hiker pro and it broke after 2 backcountry hunts.

tdub24
09-14-2013, 02:01 PM
I have the katadyn base camp system. Tested it out this summer, and it worked fairly well. Took approximately 1 minute to fill a 12oz bottle. Not the fastest filter, but the water tasted good. Everybody in camp seemed to like the taste of the water. Took me a few hours to figure out how to get the bottom from leaking, but now that I got, I am happy with it. Doesn't weigh too much, so if I hit the back country I think it will be with me.

lookinforwater
09-15-2013, 07:13 AM
What did you have to do to keep the bottom from leaking? I was also worried about if it is bulky when you are packing it.

tdub24
09-15-2013, 08:02 AM
Fixing the leak really wasn't that difficult, just had a bad decision. The filter comes in from the bottom and is threaded. But the bag is not threaded. There is a black piece that screws around the bottom holding the filter in place. Ultimately, I figured out that I had this black piece screwed on too tight. I just twisted the filter a little, then put the black piece just barely snug and the water stopped leaking out. Not sure why they would design the filter to be screwed in, but no threads on the receiving in.

As far a packing goes, you can put everything inside the bag and roll it up. Doesn't take up too much room and is light. I think I have the weight on my computer at home, if I remember, I will post it.

lookinforwater
09-15-2013, 04:11 PM
Thanks for the info, I think the base camp and hiker pro are pretty much the same weight if I remember right.

tdub24
09-15-2013, 05:30 PM
My Katadyn Vario weighs in at 19.9 oz, and the Katadyn Base Camp weighs in at 12.2oz (all components stuffed on the inside and bag rolled up). I carry the Vario 90% of the time, but like I previously stated, I will be carrying the base camp in addition if I decide to walk in and stay on the mountain for a few days. Just will have to make sure I am somewhat close to water. Box says the base camp can hold 2.6 gallons, so if I fill it up, I don't want to walk too far with that in my hands.

ArmyArcher
03-15-2014, 04:41 PM
Used the Katadyn Hiker Pro first time last season and worked great. Also use tablets for back up.

If you don't like the after taste of tablets, pack you some Mios or other beverage mix of choice...

Another thing that helped us was packing in a Coleman 5G plastic container. Once we found water, we filled it up and left at camp to reduce trips back to the water source.

arwaterfowler
03-15-2014, 08:17 PM
I have used the Katadyn Hiker Pro for years and really like the way it packs in my pack. I also bring some Iodine tablets as a backup. Mark

X2, two old standbys

Squirrel tail
03-20-2014, 04:15 PM
Back in 2007 my hunting partner and I were packing in around 6 miles into the wilderness out of the Cinnabar Basin, north of Gardner MT, for an archery elk hunt. We had hunted the area before and we always drank right out of a stream that was about 2 miles in. Just like in the past we drank from the stream, only this time something wasn't right. By nightfall I had a raging temp, chills, vomiting, diareaha, and a splitting headache. We hastily made a camp in less than ideal terrain and I proceeded to eat every single medication in both of our first aid packs. I have never in my life thought that an illness in the backcountry was going to come so close to killing me. We woke up the next morning and my temp had broke but I still wasn't feeling to well. We hunted the morning and then decided we needed to head out. To top it all off we ran into a young griz at 10 yds on the hike out. Learned a lot of lessons on that particular hunt, or I guess you could say hike since it only lasted less than 24 hours.

i had the same symptoms but it took 2 weeks for me ..... in all not a good time ..i still will drink out of a spring if im right where it comes out but if im not within 20 yds from the source i filter

dihardhunter
03-20-2014, 05:36 PM
Sawyer MINI - hands down winner in my opinion. Just make to sure to keep it cozied up to you at night otherwise you could have freezing malfunctions.

archer8524
03-20-2014, 06:11 PM
Has anyone used the platypus gravityworks 4.0 ? I was looking at getting one of these any pros cons versus the other brands?

extreme minnesotan
03-21-2014, 05:18 AM
Thanks for all the information and opinions on this thread for water filtration. I have and use a Katadyn Hiker Pro and have not had any issues with it and thought it was very easy to pump. I also carry iodine tables for back up. I never realized how many options are available for filtration.