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View Full Version : Spotter Magnification question(s)



Mark
07-14-2013, 08:18 PM
Going to pull the trigger on a spotter. Is there any sense in getting one that has the same magnification (high end) as your binos or have you just duplicated the same piece of equipment?

Also, is there a huge difference between 50-60-80mm etc objectives? Upside? Downside?

Im from the school that bigger isn't always better. I need a good spotter to compliment my binos (10x42) but don't need the next Hubble.

Also looking to pack this baby around and use with my tripod.

Appreciate the help/suggestions.

Mark

hardstalk
07-14-2013, 08:38 PM
Several valid questions you bring up. Bigger is typically better on a 50/50 scale. The point of a spotter is to see farther and save your legs from hiking 3 miles after what you thought was a monster bull/buck. In the same hand if your shooting for an ultra light pack setup you may want to slim it down for weight purposes. Even though I consider my gear on the ultralight side. I save weight everywhere possible in order to justify 10x42 binos, 15x56 binos and an 85mm spotter. (Yes typically all three on a 2-3 day hunt) I feel they all have their purpose but some do not agree with that which is ok. Another way to justify the sizes between a 50mm a 65mm or an 85mm is light gathering ability for dusk and dawn hunting and also typically the larger the scope the more zoom capacity it will offer. If you compare the zoom of a vortex razor 65 to the vortex razor 85 you will see what I mean.

Musket Man
07-14-2013, 09:29 PM
IMO a good quality 65mm is the all around spotting scope. I have a Ziess 65 and I am very happy with it. I wouldnt mind having an 80mm at times but I prefer the smaller lighter 65 for backpacking and I cant afford 2 spotting scopes right now. It also depends on the quality of spotting scope. A good 65 will do more for you then a lesser quality 80.

Mark
07-14-2013, 09:34 PM
Thanks guys. I appreciate the feedback. I've been looking at some 50s and 65s. Still not sure what's going to win out.

So do either of you see an upside to the spotter if it has the same magnification as your bios?

hardstalk
07-14-2013, 09:43 PM
I think your thinking of a monocular. I guess if you really dislike binos it is an option. Im not sure of any real spotters that are a fixed 10 power optic. The intention of the spotter is to do what the binos cant. The binos have a great field if view and can show you whats close with little effort. But the spotter really shines mid day when there isnt much activity and you can spend an additional 2-3 hours in one spot just picking apart the terrain, under the trees and so on. Its a game changer for sure!

hardstalk
07-14-2013, 09:45 PM
Also I sent you a p.m

Musket Man
07-14-2013, 09:57 PM
For me the purpose of the spotter is for more magnification then my binos to pick apart the terrain or get a better look at an animal I spotted with my binos. I had a compact Leupold 50mm spotter a few years ago (I forget the magnification) and it really couldnt do anything my 10x42 Swarovski's couldnt do. After 1 hunt I decided it wasnt worth packing and I ended up returning it.

Bitterroot Bulls
07-14-2013, 10:35 PM
A spotter that duplicates your binos is redundant. You will see MORE with the binos mounted on the tripod due to the effect of binocular summation.

The advantage of the spotting scope is in a more magnified image.

I used to really like the 50mm spotter for backpacking and 80+mm class for everything else. However, I began taking the big gun on more and more backpacking trips. So now the ED50 is gone, and kept the 85mm spotter is left. I have, however, been using a 65mm scope quite a bit lately, and recognize the balance it provides in portability vs. performance.

This is a tough question, and it seems I am always changing my mind on it.

hardstalk
07-14-2013, 10:47 PM
Him and I have been texting a bit. The confusion was how to read the magnification of the spotters. He was under the impression the 16-48x65 spotter was a 16 power fixed with a 48mm lens.

Easily understand where he's coming from. B.B received alot if these same questions from me a couple years ago.

Fatrascal
07-15-2013, 09:33 AM
I like the 65mm scope with 25x50 or 16x48 zoom lens. I'm sure hardstalk explained that the 16x48 is the adjustable zoom capabilities and not fixed power and that the 65mm stands for the size of the objective lens. It can definitely be a little confusing at first. fatrascal.

jarheadhunter
07-15-2013, 11:29 AM
I like my 65mm and think its the better option for me. I have more power and clarity then the smaller ones yet not as big and bulky as the 80+mm ones. I did check out the new 50mm Razor the other day and it was pretty sweet. I still would prob grab my 65mm Swarovski out of the safe though when it came time to head to hills.

I have the 20-60x eyepice right now, but I would really like the wide angle 25-50x.

clacklin009
07-15-2013, 12:08 PM
Mark, as you can infer from many of the posts, you, like most of us want to use our spotter in multiple ways so one of the major things you have to ask yourself is what will be my main application. If you are an established backpacker, or you are a guy that will stick with what you do and will be mostly packing the scope up, then you should go with a 50mm-65mm scope. If you think you will end up doing a lot of glassing from camp or just off the road then a bigger scope will be better. There is a nice benefit that comes will larger scopes, they will perform better at higher magnifications. If you take two of the same scopes, one a 65mm and one a 85mm, the 85mm will be brighter. The only way to have a smaller scope perform comparable to a larger scope is to increase the quality of the scope. Many people will compare the 85mm Vortex Razor with the 65mm Swaro. If you were to make that comparison and found them to be equal you could buy the Vortex to save money, however, it is not a very packable scope due to size and weight. If you can afford the swaro 65mm it will perform great at high magnification (not as good as the Swaro 80mm) it is a 20-60x, and is smaller and lighter then the Vortex so it is still packable. Once you have your price range you apply that the the scopes in question and the way you will use it. You might want to get a higher quality 65mm than a 80-85mm larger scope, same price range.

I have the Nikon ED 50mm and I love it, because it does what I need it to do, however, if I hunt a different area I will be looking to get the 65mm Swaro so I have more magnification and better light gathering. The 50mm's quality diminishes at the high end of 30x similar to the 65mm diminishing around the 40x, so you will get at least 10x the magnification will equal performance. Usually you have a better eye piece with the bigger scope.

Mark
07-16-2013, 08:29 AM
Thanks for all the great info guys. I'm relatively new here and it's been really awesome to get such good feedback and personal tips.

dead river
07-30-2013, 08:53 PM
..........This is a tough question, and it seems I am always changing my mind on it.

Then we are in trouble since a fair number of us rely on BB to help us make up our minds. I am trying to decide whether or not to sell my ED50 and I may just go with Bitters latest trend, 65 scope for all around.

HuskyMusky
08-07-2013, 04:48 PM
My personal outlook on this is...

my binos will usually be a 10x43 sized, so 10x

my scope will have an upper end of 10x or 14x

I'd consider 2 spotters, 1 big one for from the truck style spotting, and in this case, bigger the better, 80mm glass etc... and then a lightweight spotter something like a 20-30x with a smaller than 80mm objective. So depending what your spotter will be used for, yes it would determine what size I'd get.

and yes I wouldn't want a spotter of the same mag as my binos, what's the point then? plus your binos have 2 lens for 2 eyes vs. 1 of a spotter. so I'd leave the spotter home in that case.


bigger spotter glass means being able to use more upper end mag too, usually. ie... a 60x on a 100mm lens will work but on a 65mm lens god luck using 60x unless everything is perfect in the atmosphere...

I believe my spotter is a 20-60x 65mm and rarely am I able to use it to full 60x magnification in the field...

hardstalk
08-07-2013, 05:30 PM
My personal outlook on this is...

my binos will usually be a 10x43 sized, so 10x

my scope will have an upper end of 10x or 14x

I'd consider 2 spotters, 1 big one for from the truck style spotting, and in this case, bigger the better, 80mm glass etc... and then a lightweight spotter something like a 20-30x with a smaller than 80mm objective. So depending what your spotter will be used for, yes it would determine what size I'd get.

and yes I wouldn't want a spotter of the same mag as my binos, what's the point then? plus your binos have 2 lens for 2 eyes vs. 1 of a spotter. so I'd leave the spotter home in that case.


bigger spotter glass means being able to use more upper end mag too, usually. ie... a 60x on a 100mm lens will work but on a 65mm lens god luck using 60x unless everything is perfect in the atmosphere...

I believe my spotter is a 20-60x 65mm and rarely am I able to use it to full 60x magnification in the field...

What spotter are you using husky?