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westernwannabe
04-29-2011, 10:28 PM
Hey guys planning a first time teton backpack trip for muleys. Can someone give me a pack list for 5days and any other note worthy tips are much appreciated.

spotnstalk1
05-03-2011, 07:30 PM
backpack, tent/bivy, sleeping bag, flashlight or headlamp, cooking stove, cooking fuel, cooking pot, knife, range finder, bino's, spotting scope, jacket/rain gear, rope, watch, TP, mole skin, GPS(if you've got it), water bladder, iodine tablets, E-mergen-C drink flavor(personal preference), 5 days of food, small first aid kit, personal hygiene stuff, tag, license, extra equipment needed (nocks, D-loop, ammo, etc depending on how you're hunting) extra socks, underwear, map, compass, camera. Thats a lot of the basics. I'm sure I missed some stuff. Hope this is a good start.

GrantMan
05-03-2011, 08:20 PM
The above list has everything covered. I would throw in a space blanket and fire starter just in case you don't make it back to your camp.

And maybe spare flashlight and batteries.

wileywapiti
05-04-2011, 07:20 AM
i know it was mentioned, but.....make sure you have a good GPS! It will save your life if you get lost or fogged in or cant get back because it is too dark. ive been in the back country for 26 years now and nothing has gotten me out of bad situations better than keeping my mind straight and having a GPS. Also..ive spent the night out with a space blanket or a fire. it saved my life, but since i bought and learned how to used my GPS....ive NEVER not gotten back to camp.

to me not all GPS are the same. i like the ones that you can actually download satilite images on and actually see where you are on the map, not just a line and where you have to go (this also helps you keep a clear head if you feel yourself panicking because you think you might be getting lost). i have navigated miles in the dark with my psn 40, just because i could see where to go and see if i could skirt timber or hills or lakes or see a short cut that i did not take earlier in the day.

not only can it save your life, it will also give you a little more confidence to get back a little further into the dark holes that maybe you weren't sure about because you weren't sure about getting back to camp.

*******
05-04-2011, 01:45 PM
Camp: Bivy sac, sleeping bag, thermarest, 8 x10' siltarp. Whisperlight stove, fuel bottle, titanium pot, spork. Dehydrated food and various snack food. Wind up flashlight, lighters. Water purifying pump, iodine tablets

Hunting gear: bow, 2 releases, range finder, binos, spotting scope, tripod, scent wipes, wind checker, maps, pencil, gloves, wool base layers, camo pants and top, rain gear, knife, rope 125'', climbing pulley x2, game bags, scalpels with extra blades

Misc: headlamp, extra socks, extra underwear, lens cleaning kit, super glue, morphine, compression bandage,

muskiemauler22
05-04-2011, 02:34 PM
How much do your packs usually weigh before you add heads and meat etc?

spotnstalk1
05-04-2011, 04:06 PM
The above list has everything covered. I would throw in a space blanket and fire starter just in case you don't make it back to your camp.

And maybe spare flashlight and batteries.

Good point GrantMan. I think I forgot to add a lighter of some kind. I try to keep my pack between 55 and 65 lbs depending on the hunt location and time of year. (before adding heads or meat) and thats not counting the weight of my bow/arrow rig, rangefinder(on my belt), binos (around my neck) and my release(around my wrist).

westernwannabe
05-04-2011, 07:53 PM
Excellent post wileywapiti you answered my next post and made some great points about the GPS giving you confidence to push harder. I've thought of buying a GPS and was a little worried one time when I was DIY bow hunting the North Dakota Badlands. It's easy to get caught up and chase that animal a little farther than expected. Lucky for me their are some buttes that rise higher than the rest and make good land marks. It saved me from a chilly night! But there is no doubt I'd have a GPS where you hunt. Also thanks twp.1224 for the gear list PM exactly what I was looking for.

T43
05-05-2011, 09:24 AM
A GPS is great I don't leave home without one, however there is no guarantee that it will work when you need it to the most. If you get bogged down in heavy timber and need directions a good topo and compass will replace a GPS in a hurry. The only other thing I can add is Pop Tarts, how can anyone go into the backcountry overnight without Pop Tarts? In all reality it's good to have some comfort food with you whatever it is.

mcseal2
07-16-2011, 10:09 AM
This is my list I have saved from my computer with weights from my postage scale. The list is intended for my half of the gear on a 3 day hunt with 2 people, but you can get some ideas from it.

gear wt
Kifaru sawtooth tipi 72oz total 1/2wt 36
Kifaru Parastove 40oz total 1/2 wt 20
Sleeping bag Montbell ULSS 15 degree 37
Sleeping pad Thermarest prolite plus 20x72 24
GPS/radio Garmin Rhino 130 w/weatherband 9
Snow peak mug .7L w/lid 5
Snow peak spork 1
eberlestock J34 110
Frogg Toggs pants 13.2
toilet paper 4
1.3oz Sea to Summit soap 1
katadyn filter (1 between us 14.3oz total) 7.2
Nalgene 96oz soft canteen (camp water) 3oz total 2
Browning 270WSM (8.5lbs scoped,loaded,sling) 136
Victorinox trekker knife 4.4
benchmade folder 3.7
Smith pocket knife sharpener 0.9
spare ammo 16
spare batteries (AA lithium) 4
black fleece gloves 3.4
wool gloves 1.4
firesteel & small bic lighter on cord 1.4
pill bottle of cotton balls covered in vaseline 0.9
scope caps 0.7
adventure medical bivy sack 4.2
100ft 550 paracord 6.3
Frontier water filter straw 0.5
wind meter 1.9
first aid kit 4.6
headlamps (2) Mammut S-lite AA 1.7oz each 4
trashbags (2) dry bags or packing meat 2
camera (1 between us, 6oz total with AA lithium) 3
rangefinder (with 9V lithium) 12.2
bipod (stoney point rapid pivot removable) 11.1
Leupold binoculars & harness 29
blaze orange windstopper fleece baclava 5
camelback 70oz bladder (empty wt) 6
wool socks (2pr) 6
Cabelas MTP boxers 10
compass & map 2
Marmon Zeus down jacket 12
Cell phone 4.1
Total Gear (33.7lbs) 557
food (5lbs) 80
Water (full camelback) 70
Total Weight leaving vehicle 716 oz
44.75 lbs

BigT
07-29-2011, 04:37 PM
ok one thing i dont see is BABY WIPES. a must have

T43
07-29-2011, 05:17 PM
Definitely however I use the scent prevention field wipes. that are the same thing without the flowery smell.

mthuntress
07-30-2011, 01:58 AM
One thing I didn't see on the list is a SPOT a must have;if you hunt{solo like I do 90% of the time} solo/team and it can/will save your live it did for a buddy of mine.

T43
07-30-2011, 02:02 AM
I've been looking at the SPOT but the mixed reviews make me wonder if it's worth the cost. I know it would be worth it's weight in gold if I needed it and it worked but it's a lot of money to pay if I can't get it to work.

anglinarcher
08-03-2011, 07:41 AM
I also have the BL sacrifice and I'll get 4-5 days worth of supplies as well as camp in there or at least lashed to the outside.

BigT
08-04-2011, 03:05 PM
you are correct T43 ref wipes. Last thing i will say is dont forget the Flour. always carry a small bag in my big pack for those fresh backstraps..

bowhuntress
08-31-2011, 09:09 AM
the Sept - Oct Eastmans bowhunting journal (just got it yesterday) has an exact list of what Guy Eastman takes on a 5 day hunt. Broken down by type, weight and what is in it. Very interesting!

MT backcountry hunter
08-31-2011, 01:01 PM
My pack for a 3 day hunt without consumables (food,water) and without spotting scope/tripod is 18.5 pounds, that is with a pack that weighs 8.5 pounds. I could very easily shave another 1.5 pounds off of that. No reason to carry 45 pounds on your back into the backcountry any more.

Grantbvfd
09-08-2011, 04:55 PM
My pack for a 3 day hunt without consumables (food,water) and without spotting scope/tripod is 18.5 pounds, that is with a pack that weighs 8.5 pounds. I could very easily shave another 1.5 pounds off of that. No reason to carry 45 pounds on your back into the backcountry any more.

I agree with MT I can see maybe 35lbs at the most. With a nice spotter and consumables. Unless you are on a tight budget and can't afford light weight things....

RUTTIN
09-20-2011, 01:14 PM
Guy Eastman just did a really good article in EBJ on this very question, check it out and it may help you out!

Gman
09-20-2011, 02:23 PM
My pack for a 3 day hunt without consumables (food,water) and without spotting scope/tripod is 18.5 pounds, that is with a pack that weighs 8.5 pounds. I could very easily shave another 1.5 pounds off of that. No reason to carry 45 pounds on your back into the backcountry any more.

Would you mind sharing your pack list? Are you saying you're really at 10 pounds (18.5-8.5 pack weight) or 18.5 on top of that? When I do my weight I list everything in a spreadsheet, including packweight. I too check it before consumables but then add those in as it is very relevant especially when they're on your back! I'm also assuming you're not counting any hunting weapons, ammo, etc. in your weight and that the pack you use for this example might get heavier in a month or so due to weather? Not challenging, just curious.