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ScottR
03-27-2014, 11:06 AM
Hey all,
If you have been following us on Facebook I am sure that you have seen the uptick in activity and all the animals that have come up on our wall. This has been great for our FB page and we have enjoyed seeing all of the great animals that you and others have shared with us.

One of the hardest things I am finding out about this job is telling a guy with a 375 bull that we can't use it for the magazine because his pictures are terrible. Please be prepared in the field with at minimum a decent point and shoot camera to capture your memories. Here are a few things to help you be prepared for that moment.

1. Your cell phone camera is great for the little moment, but when it comes to the big stuff have a point and shoot. Personally I carry a Nikon D3100 with a Sigma 28/200 lens. For most people this is overkill, but when I started to write I learned quickly that my cell pictures were not going to cut it. If you haven't read Mike's article on this subject, start there. Take a look at the bottom of this blog to see why it is so tough to use cell pictures here: http://blog.eastmans.com/how-to-get-your-story-published/

2. Take the time to pose well, I know this sounds stupid when we are interested in meat care, but you will only take one trophy of a lifetime unless money is no object. You will want to remember that moment for the rest of your life because once you start breaking it down, it can't be undone. Mike has another blog that can be found here:
http://blog.eastmans.com/pssst-mikes-trophy-photo-set-up-secrets/

What else do you guys do to take quality pictures?

Timberstalker
03-27-2014, 12:18 PM
I use a Canon Power Shot camera, it's big and bulky but it's what I have. The delay timer and a tripod help a lot, I will set the delay so the camera is dead still when the picture is taken, even if I don't need the delay I use it.

It's tough to take the time to set things up, but in the end it's worth it. We spend months and sometimes years preparing for the hunt, why not take a few extra minutes to capture it on camera?

Musket Man
03-27-2014, 12:36 PM
Very true Timber but some of us have trouble thinking that clearly for several hours after killing a big buck, even a not so big buck most times:)

CrossCreeks
03-27-2014, 12:38 PM
Set up for a good background ! Now a days pictures are cheap, take a lot and from different angles !

ScottR
03-27-2014, 12:58 PM
Lets include some examples, this could be a really good thread with some pictures!

25contender
03-27-2014, 01:42 PM
I always try to take pics and video if possible. I have been using the same 2 cameras/video cameras for the past 5 years. I have been using a canon HV20 and a HV40. It takes pretty good video and photos. A little bulky but works pretty good. Here are a few from last season.

http://cdn-3-service.phanfare.com/images/external/1068386_5975729_203222412_WebLarge_2/0_0_2697c8cf98a82aac07ecc1a925e0d4c6_1

http://cdn-3-service.phanfare.com/images/external/1068386_5975729_202740300_WebLarge_3/0_0_9397412b6f6f7943b6b7b95365566b8d_1

http://cdn-3-service.phanfare.com/images/external/1068386_6029246_184567781_WebLarge_3/0_0_317119b4d9ac227385e808139f6566e8_1

Timberstalker
03-27-2014, 04:41 PM
Here's one I've never shared, what do you guys think? Antelope I found to be tough, they are so small it's hard to get down to their level.

http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y435/tchoate3/IMG_2688_zps935a7f31.jpg

D.Turvey, Jr
03-27-2014, 04:52 PM
If you all want, I can critique the posted photos if you're interested in what we look at from a publication stand point.

So in that vein here we go.

A lot of times with antelope if you take the time to prop them up so their brisket is touching the ground with their legs folded under them instead of them laying on their side/rib cage, you won't have to get so low and it makes it easier to position yourself behind their shoulder. Also, you have to be mindful of not tipping their chin up to high, very slightly down is good. The camera is a touch far away and you may want to consider laying the rifle across his chest. And as always, take lots of pictures with lots of angles.

Timberstalker
03-27-2014, 05:01 PM
My sheep was a challange, I was solo on this one too. The brush was so thick I had to clear brush with a hatchet for 30 min just to get a clear view. From the time I shot it till I was done taking photo's was over an hour.

Here's what it looked like after clearing the brush.

http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y435/tchoate3/2011sheephunt106_zpsb1368d9b.jpg


Here's some photo's that were published EHJ
http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y435/tchoate3/2011sheephunt094_zps9f38f1f0.jpg
http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y435/tchoate3/2011sheephunt089_zpse1b739b6.jpg

Here's what a cell phone photo looks like!

http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y435/tchoate3/IMG00149_zpsa3f06a82.jpg

D.Turvey, Jr
03-27-2014, 05:26 PM
Clearing the foreground obstructions is definitely a great idea. In the second image I would have turned the ram so he's up hill and closer to the camera. That would make is easier to position yourself behind the shoulder and down hill of the animal making the ram look larger. Remember when you stand vertically behind the animal it gives the viewer a frame of reference and makes the trophy look a tad smaller. In the third image, the foreground obstructions could have been cropped closer to the ground and watch out for the obstruction in the lower right corner creeping in. Other than that the above applies. Though the cell phone photo looks good at this percentage, when we enlarge they fall apart quickly.

Timberstalker
03-27-2014, 06:00 PM
I appriciate the critique Dan.

D.Turvey, Jr
03-27-2014, 06:04 PM
I just want to do what I can to help guys out and get better if they are interested in doing so. I hope some of the things we discuss here will do that.

Timberstalker
03-27-2014, 06:17 PM
Same reason I took the time to post, I hope someone gains from it.

AKaviator
03-27-2014, 06:34 PM
Here are a few photos from a sheep/caribou hunt from a couple years ago.

http://i1057.photobucket.com/albums/t400/mumford2515/252_zps149a8013.jpg (http://s1057.photobucket.com/user/mumford2515/media/252_zps149a8013.jpg.html)

http://i1057.photobucket.com/albums/t400/mumford2515/281_zpsa275e592.jpg (http://s1057.photobucket.com/user/mumford2515/media/281_zpsa275e592.jpg.html)

http://i1057.photobucket.com/albums/t400/mumford2515/336_zps52e0624a.jpg (http://s1057.photobucket.com/user/mumford2515/media/336_zps52e0624a.jpg.html)

http://i1057.photobucket.com/albums/t400/mumford2515/374_zpsba82cc4e.jpg (http://s1057.photobucket.com/user/mumford2515/media/374_zpsba82cc4e.jpg.html)

Musket Man
03-27-2014, 06:37 PM
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t18/Musket-Man/Idahohunt12033_zpsf972f43f.jpg (http://s156.photobucket.com/user/Musket-Man/media/Idahohunt12033_zpsf972f43f.jpg.html)

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t18/Musket-Man/Idahohunt12030_zpsf63bb48a.jpg (http://s156.photobucket.com/user/Musket-Man/media/Idahohunt12030_zpsf63bb48a.jpg.html)

Retterath
03-27-2014, 07:19 PM
Great pics guys. When I have posted some pics lately they show up so small and aren't the size of the whole post spot, is it because I took it with my iPhone and not a camera. Sorry probably a dumb question

AKaviator
03-27-2014, 07:29 PM
No, we have been putting them on a site called "Photo bucket" and then moving them from there to here. They show up larger then.

Retterath
03-27-2014, 07:40 PM
O ok I will have to check that out. Thanks ak

25contender
03-28-2014, 08:42 AM
I just want to do what I can to help guys out and get better if they are interested in doing so. I hope some of the things we discuss here will do that.
Always interested in some good tips on set up and taking photos.

D.Turvey, Jr
03-28-2014, 08:52 AM
AK,

For support photos those would work reasonably well. Way to make a guy with a desk job jealous ;) Love that country up there.

D.Turvey, Jr
03-28-2014, 09:02 AM
Musket Man,

1st Image: Wipe the blood off the mouth and don't prop his head up on the rifle. Consider rotating his body so his head is to your left (uphill) and let that bush obscure from the mid ribs back to his hind quarters. Another mistake a lot of guys make is wrapping their entire hand or hands around the main beams. This can give the viewer a frame of reference and make the deer look smaller. I would also tip his chin slightly down and quarter turn him to your right. Instead of taking a knee, consider sitting cross leg or on your rear end behind his shoulder making sure your left knee is hidden as much as possible behind the deer. Also be mindful of that brush creeping up over the right side of the bucks face.

2nd Image: Pretty much the same things apply here as in the first but I like what you're doing with getting the second angle of his rack. You might have considered turning it more to your left to bring out that back fork more.

D.Turvey, Jr
03-28-2014, 09:07 AM
One thing to understand as well gentlemen, is these are "blue sky" suggestions. Obviously if you have a 600-pound bull facing steeply down hill or locked up in a tree or something, there may not be much you can do with the images/animal in that situation. So take that into consideration when reading the posts. You'll know when you have the time and place to work with the images/animal and when you don't.

CrossCreeks
03-28-2014, 09:12 AM
Great critique's , keep them coming and the pictures ! I think we all will learn something !

ScottR
03-28-2014, 10:02 AM
Let's Create some office controversy, Dan critique my pictures please:

9022

9024

Elkoholic307
03-28-2014, 10:15 AM
Who wants to guess which one was taken with a cell phone?

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t70/tj_vanderploeg/TJ2013Antelope_zps6e5e8959.jpg (http://s157.photobucket.com/user/tj_vanderploeg/media/TJ2013Antelope_zps6e5e8959.jpg.html)

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t70/tj_vanderploeg/8_zps63bdec71.jpg (http://s157.photobucket.com/user/tj_vanderploeg/media/8_zps63bdec71.jpg.html)

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t70/tj_vanderploeg/IMG_0035_zps05c5c783.jpg (http://s157.photobucket.com/user/tj_vanderploeg/media/IMG_0035_zps05c5c783.jpg.html)

D.Turvey, Jr
03-28-2014, 10:29 AM
Let's Create some office controversy, Dan critique my pictures please:

9022

9024

Oh man, here we go! Hold on while I lock my office door first ;)

In the first image the grass in the foreground is a little concerning but not terrible. You and your animal are off center in the frame and you might have considered sitting on your rear end to get your knees down. I might suggest propping her head up more as well. I would also suggest taking the pictures angling from the front instead of the rear. You'll also notice you're on the edge of your flash range and the angle up towards the sky washes out the top half of the image. Note: never take pictures where the camera is facing a bright source of light such as sun, sky, etc. This is particularly important with the antler tines are in the bright space as we nearly lose them. Alway have the light to the rear of the camera or at an angle over a shoulder. Be mindful of deep shadows cutting across your trophy to.

In the second image you have a good background and decently composed shot but the focus appears to be off. You tried to minimize your hands on the rack which is good but might I suggest grabbing him with one hand at the base of his skull or using two fingers on the antler bases just above the ears. Also, this straight on angle doesn't do your buck justice. As a viewer, we can't really get a solid feel for what the rack has going on. The backpack seems to be a major component of the image as well, maybe even so overwhelming it could be considered the focus of the image. Try to minimize the importance of your gear.

In the thumbnail you've cut off most of the deers body and are centered in the lower right quadrant. This image would not be published because there's not much we can work with and the composition is off. We could possibly use an image like this as a Successful Trophy Hunter at best.

That brings up a good point to. Don't frame your trophy to tightly to the edge of the image frame as it handcuffs us in the design phase but on the same token, don't leave copious amounts of "air" either. There's a solid middle ground you'll have to develop a feel for.

D.Turvey, Jr
03-28-2014, 10:49 AM
Who wants to guess which one was taken with a cell phone?

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t70/tj_vanderploeg/TJ2013Antelope_zps6e5e8959.jpg (http://s157.photobucket.com/user/tj_vanderploeg/media/TJ2013Antelope_zps6e5e8959.jpg.html)

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t70/tj_vanderploeg/8_zps63bdec71.jpg (http://s157.photobucket.com/user/tj_vanderploeg/media/8_zps63bdec71.jpg.html)

http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t70/tj_vanderploeg/IMG_0035_zps05c5c783.jpg (http://s157.photobucket.com/user/tj_vanderploeg/media/IMG_0035_zps05c5c783.jpg.html)

You've got some good and bad going on here.

In the first image the animal is posed well with legs tucked up and under, the goat's chin is level to slightly down and angled to your right slightly so we can get a good feel for his cutters and hooks. The rifle in front is not bad, though I would like to see this pose without the rifle as well for a feature story. You're holding the back of his head and not the horns, very nice. Good, clear foreground. My only suggestions would be to move slightly to your right and sit on your rear end, though that's not a deal breaker. Clean the blood off around his mouth and tip your hat up slightly to lighten your face. Obviously you had flat, overcast light which isn't a bad thing but consider taking a few pictures with the flash as well.

In the second image you and the animal are positioned well and you're holding the back of his head but I am assuming your fingers were right behind his ears pushing them out, try to grasp a lower vertebrae to alleviate this problem. This is a good example of having the wrong sun angle to. Try to rotate the animal so the sun is at the cameras back, otherwise as you can see, deep shadows came across you and your trophy. Try to clean his mouth up a little more.

The third image is actually pretty solid. I would tip his hat up slightly to lighten his face. I would also turn the animals head to his right slightly and tuck in the tongue. Consider positioning the hunter behind the bucks shoulder for a few shots as well. The image is cropped tight to the top of his hat and the animals leg which doesn't give us much to work with. Other than that it's a solid, clean photo.

Timberstalker
03-28-2014, 11:04 AM
One thing to understand as well gentlemen, is these are "blue sky" suggestions. Obviously if you have a 600-pound bull facing steeply down hill or locked up in a tree or something, there may not be much you can do with the images/animal in that situation. So take that into consideration when reading the posts. You'll know when you have the time and place to work with the images/animal and when you don't.

Copy that! The ram picture I posted the ground is WAY steeper than it looks. There was no way I was going to try to move it away from the two trees that were keeping it from rolling down the hill.
That finger ridge across the cayon above my head is where I killed him.

http://i1274.photobucket.com/albums/y435/tchoate3/2011sheephunt070_zps33524904.jpg

D.Turvey, Jr
03-28-2014, 11:09 AM
Ah c'mon, a sheep hunter eats country like that for breakfast. What's moving a 300-pound ram uphill compared to that :)

AKaviator
03-28-2014, 12:03 PM
AK,

For support photos those would work reasonably well. Way to make a guy with a desk job jealous ;) Love that country up there.

Thanks; I like the 3rd photo because it was taken a second after my son sat up from watching his bull drop. His smile is real.
We didn't get the ram that we were after...a 44" beast. The caribou was consolation on the final day.

This is a really good thread; I've always been an avid picture taker...I'm trying to become a photographer. Critiques help a lot!

ScottR
03-28-2014, 12:08 PM
I will post pics up of what I would actually use, my partner and I got some really good shots. Before I worked here I was thinking for freelance internet stories, and you have more wiggle room with those types of pictures.

Musket Man
03-28-2014, 02:20 PM
As he lay and when I spotted him. I know the live pic isnt very clear. I took it through my spotter.

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t18/Musket-Man/Idahohunt12017_zps0f1e4119.jpg (http://s156.photobucket.com/user/Musket-Man/media/Idahohunt12017_zps0f1e4119.jpg.html)

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t18/Musket-Man/Idahohunt12015_zps09b5f43e.jpg (http://s156.photobucket.com/user/Musket-Man/media/Idahohunt12015_zps09b5f43e.jpg.html)

RUTTIN
03-28-2014, 06:43 PM
http://i1247.photobucket.com/albums/gg635/GFFAdventures/Archery%202012/2012ExtededArchery069.jpg (http://s1247.photobucket.com/user/GFFAdventures/media/Archery%202012/2012ExtededArchery069.jpg.html)

Here is a buck I killed on the extended archery,any and all critique would be great, thanks!

ScottR
03-28-2014, 11:27 PM
Lighting is good, snow aids with that a lot. You also did a good job with the angles of the antlers, best fork looks good.

When posing the deer get the legs underneath, they are sticking out awkwardly. Position the bow further from center and not so off kilter.

From a photography end of things, get lower as a photographer or with the tripod. Looking down will help avoid the squinting.

JasonGNV
03-29-2014, 07:34 AM
Scott and Dan, this is a great thread, thanks.
Keep the pics rolling guys!

packmule
03-30-2014, 11:25 AM
http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk114/davide_smith/East%20Tx%20Bucks/2013%20deer/Pam_cam_COLORADO130_zps69fb40f4.jpg

tttoadman
03-30-2014, 12:17 PM
Beat me up. I even had a guy to take the photos. I was trying to get out from behind hi, but these brutes are heavy.

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012065_zps07b48f1d.jpg~original

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012058_zps6b7c8d7c.jpg~original

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012052_zps60a93108.jpg~original

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012053_zps95d66f2c.jpg~original

ScottR
03-30-2014, 02:58 PM
Beat me up. I even had a guy to take the photos. I was trying to get out from behind hi, but these brutes are heavy.

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012065_zps07b48f1d.jpg~original

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012058_zps6b7c8d7c.jpg~original

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012052_zps60a93108.jpg~original

http://i1357.photobucket.com/albums/q760/tttoadman/2012%20OR%20Mule%20Deer/oct2012053_zps95d66f2c.jpg~original

Overall, decent pictures, and as a photographer I think you did well with the lighting.

Now, work on the posing a bit. Notice your hand placement, it takes away from the mass on that buck, and that is one of its strengths you want to show off. Always look for the best features and how you can use them to provide the best memories.

Think about it like this, when you tell the story of the buck there will certain traits you talk about. Will your friends agree when they see the pictures, or will you say that the pictures don't do it justice?

ScottR
03-30-2014, 03:12 PM
9063
This is a better picture of my buck from last year. The buck won't score well but you can see he is wide. We emphasized this trait by making the buck's antlers front and center in the picture and the point of focus. My buddy Dalton took the pictures, he is a good photographer.

Another trick is not get too far back. People can tell when you are long arming a small buck. Sometimes well placed body position does more than sitting way back!

ScottR
03-30-2014, 03:23 PM
90649065
Also don't be afraid to be creative. This was my widest deer and to date and I wanted to spend some time just looking at him. Dalton took the time to keep snapping pictures while looked him over. Shots like this help tell the story.

ScottR
03-30-2014, 03:45 PM
9066
One last thought I would add is never quit taking pictures either! Part of the story with this buck is how quickly we needed to get out of there in the snow storm. This picture shows just how full my pack really was, heavy doesn't describe it, but Dalton's picture shows it.

I will pull out some pictures of the Eastmans' kills for more examples tomorrow.

hardstalk
03-30-2014, 03:58 PM
Ive got a few that Ive been curious about. I typically don't spend too much time with the camera. but my father and I went to town on the last lope hunt. angles,brightness all kinds of stuff. beat me up. some stuff is obvious like shadows. and there is no great horn angle on a doe..90679068906990709071

ScottR
03-30-2014, 05:15 PM
The only thing we don't like on those pics is the gun, we prefer for the animal to be the focus and not the firearm.

Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk

hardstalk
03-30-2014, 07:07 PM
Thanks for the response. Noted!

Musket Man
03-30-2014, 07:13 PM
The angle really makes the horns look small hardstalk. LOL!

hardstalk
03-30-2014, 08:51 PM
The angle really makes the horns look small hardstalk. LOL!

That was taken on a governors tag. Biggest we could find in the whole state! Might wanna save your money mm! No big lopes left in NV ;)

Musket Man
03-30-2014, 09:00 PM
That was taken on a governors tag. Biggest we could find in the whole state! Might wanna save your money mm! No big lopes left in NV ;)

HEY, it might score 2!!! LOL! In that case i think I will just let my 4 points expire;)

hardstalk
03-30-2014, 09:01 PM
HEY, it might score 2!!! LOL! In that case i think I will just let my 4 points expire;)

Great call

Musket Man
03-30-2014, 09:11 PM
Im going to draw this year and kill a B&C antelope, I know it!!!!!:)

Elkoholic307
03-31-2014, 09:53 AM
The only thing we don't like on those pics is the gun, we prefer for the animal to be the focus and not the firearm.

That's funny, while looking at your pics I was thinking you should've removed the pack and put a rifle there instead.

ScottR
03-31-2014, 10:23 AM
That's funny, while looking at your pics I was thinking you should've removed the pack and put a rifle there instead.

I had to have the packs in the pictures. I was working on a major pack review at the time, if it had been for Eastmans' I probably wouldn't have done anything with the pack.

Retterath
03-31-2014, 04:05 PM
critique me guys


http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h233/bradyretterath/2012-1_zps379ffd27.jpg
http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h233/bradyretterath/photocopy5_zps120c6823.jpg

Elkoholic307
04-03-2014, 09:25 AM
Does EHJ want rifles positioned a certain way for pictures or just no guns whatsoever?

D.Turvey, Jr
04-03-2014, 05:32 PM
critique me guys


http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h233/bradyretterath/2012-1_zps379ffd27.jpg
http://i65.photobucket.com/albums/h233/bradyretterath/photocopy5_zps120c6823.jpg

First one is not bad, I would have swapped his ends so his head was closer to the camera and laid the rifle across his chest instead of propped up in front of him.

The second picture has a couple things that need work. One, you cropped the top of your head and two you grabbed the ear closest to the camera. If you would have moved the frame up and grabbed the other side of his head it would have been a very solid picture. Maybe drop your left arm so your elbow was on your thigh instead of your hand.

D.Turvey, Jr
04-03-2014, 05:42 PM
Does EHJ want rifles positioned a certain way for pictures or just no guns whatsoever?

Laying across their chest is fine but when they are on a bipod in front of the deer they give a frame of reference and make the animal appear smaller. It also give the rifle to much visual priority and not your trophy. Does that help?

Elkoholic307
04-04-2014, 10:06 AM
Yes it does, thanks. I was just confused by Scott's reply to Hardstalk's photos because the rifle was laid across the chest.

D.Turvey, Jr
04-04-2014, 05:38 PM
Yes it does, thanks. I was just confused by Scott's reply to Hardstalk's photos because the rifle was laid across the chest.

I can further clarify and say we prefer the rifle to be vertical across the animals chest so that it's perpendicular to the spine. That's what we mean by across the animals chest. To have them parallel is less desirable.

Retterath
04-04-2014, 11:08 PM
Thanks D turvey jr

Montana
04-05-2014, 05:01 AM
Oh.. love this post. Pics are truly my trophies of the hunt. I'm always after improvement. I'll get some up.

ScottR
04-05-2014, 09:48 AM
Oh.. love this post. Pics are truly my trophies of the hunt. I'm always after improvement. I'll get some up.

We look forward to seeing them!

Montana
04-05-2014, 11:05 AM
http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i212/scottfalagan/Mobile%20Uploads/20131116_105035b_zpsb06baaa0.jpg (http://s73.photobucket.com/user/scottfalagan/media/Mobile%20Uploads/20131116_105035b_zpsb06baaa0.jpg.html)
http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i212/scottfalagan/Mobile%20Uploads/2011Deer_zpsf8904744.jpg (http://s73.photobucket.com/user/scottfalagan/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2011Deer_zpsf8904744.jpg.html)

Montana
04-05-2014, 11:08 AM
http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i212/scottfalagan/Mobile%20Uploads/11-17125d_zpsf53ffae8.jpg (http://s73.photobucket.com/user/scottfalagan/media/Mobile%20Uploads/11-17125d_zpsf53ffae8.jpg.html)
http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i212/scottfalagan/Mobile%20Uploads/20130919_143737_zps2da406e5.jpg (http://s73.photobucket.com/user/scottfalagan/media/Mobile%20Uploads/20130919_143737_zps2da406e5.jpg.html)

Retterath
04-05-2014, 11:10 AM
Nice animals montana,that first pic beautiful

Montana
04-05-2014, 11:11 AM
http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i212/scottfalagan/Mobile%20Uploads/DSC00187b_zps99119caf.jpg (http://s73.photobucket.com/user/scottfalagan/media/Mobile%20Uploads/DSC00187b_zps99119caf.jpg.html)
http://i73.photobucket.com/albums/i212/scottfalagan/Mobile%20Uploads/Turkey2013073b_zpsddf630b9.jpg (http://s73.photobucket.com/user/scottfalagan/media/Mobile%20Uploads/Turkey2013073b_zpsddf630b9.jpg.html)

ok.. there they are. Fire away. I know my goat has some quality issues. I was by myself and its such a fun game running back and forth with the timer :)

BruinPoint
04-05-2014, 10:56 PM
Great pics Montana - I agree completely that the photographs are a huge part of the hunt. Your pics are a great example of how some of the easiest things can improve most people's pics a ton - i.e., using a fill flash, cleaning off the blood, clearing the vegetation in front of the animal, getting shots that include some landscape, focus, subject status, framing/cropping etc. Way harder to pull off with a self timer!

Montana
04-08-2014, 09:54 PM
Thanks Bruin... as I sort through the 100 or so pics I can usually find 1 that work. Haha.

ScottR
04-09-2014, 07:46 AM
Dan and i will take some time to comment soon. We are both rather swamped the next couple of days.

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Tapatalk 2

packmule
04-09-2014, 07:58 AM
Nice animals and pics Montana.

Out of curiosity, did you have to do much post processing?

D.Turvey, Jr
04-09-2014, 12:18 PM
Montana,

All excellent photos. Everyone of those could be used in a feature piece in one capacity or another.

Since it was brought up I will mention one thing, don't manipulate your images with photoshop or any other program prior to sending them in. Let the publications designers work with the raw image. Often times images that are already manipulated are twice as hard to work with to get it to look right as they have to undo what you did and rebuild it. So please send the raw images with your story.

Nice work Montana!

Timberstalker
04-09-2014, 12:27 PM
Very nicly done Montana, I really like the first pic!

Montana
04-09-2014, 10:07 PM
Thanks everyone..

Turvey.. I would have never thought of the unedited photo, totally makes sense though.

Packmule... Here's the breakdown of each photo..

Pic #1.. Lighting adjustments. But with that said, the color was there,thats why we chose the spot, just needed a little help bringing it out.
Pic #2.. The dirt on the rock is actually air brushed and was not done in the field. The shot behind the shoulder, completely removed the blood.
Pic #3.. Cleaned the blood up around the mouth, air brushing.
Pic #4.. Nothing but probably should have cleaned the blood up a little from the shot.
Pic #5.. Lighting adjustments.
Pic #6.. Lighting adjustments.

I know the blood is part of it and as hunters we are used it but I like to clean it up for the photo album. As a boy and even now, I love looking through photo albums, all the memories and experiences. There is not a single big game animal Ihave harvested that is not in my photo album. Even every single doe :)

packmule
04-10-2014, 11:53 AM
Reason I was asking was bc the top one and the bottom 2 have a halo-effect when they're resized for phone viewing.

I don't have very many pics left. I was "that idiot" who didn't back up computer hard drives. Also somewhere along the way I quit taking pics of does bc I was having to shoot so many of them that it turned into work.

LeatherBurner
04-15-2014, 06:54 PM
9179

DIY Muley + a great photographer, girlfriend.

She would love a critique!

Montana
04-15-2014, 07:51 PM
Great buck.

jjoneill12
04-16-2014, 10:17 AM
How is this? I know it doesn't have the rifle in the picture but I tried to set it up so that the antlers were sky-lighted. It was shot at a low angle to emphasize the size of the animal, and it captured the hilly terrain we were hunting. I always try to take a good harvest photo, so any and all recommendations are welcomed!

9182

D.Turvey, Jr
04-16-2014, 11:03 AM
9179

DIY Muley + a great photographer, girlfriend.

She would love a critique!

Fairly good shot. I would suggest not propping his head up on the log and sitting on your rear end to scale the buck up a bit. Tuck his tongue in and don't forget to use the highest resolution on your camera. I would also suggest moving him to your right to get a less obstructed background so we can get a better feel for his antlers.

D.Turvey, Jr
04-16-2014, 11:05 AM
How is this? I know it doesn't have the rifle in the picture but I tried to set it up so that the antlers were sky-lighted. It was shot at a low angle to emphasize the size of the animal, and it captured the hilly terrain we were hunting. I always try to take a good harvest photo, so any and all recommendations are welcomed!

9182

Not to bad. I would sit on your rear end to get lower behind the buck to give him the visual priority and prop him up on his brisket. Tip your cap up a touch to get some light on your face and turn the buck more toward the sun. As you can see with this angle, the sun cast a deep shadow across the bucks face.