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    What would you buy

    I am looking for some good advice. I am going to get some new 10x42 binoculars this year. I only have $500-$600 to spend. For the money, what would you buy?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Save your money until you can get a pair of zeiss or Swarovskis. My opinion. I have a pair of leupold golden ring that is in your price range but I wouldnt recommend them unless you were to keep em in your truck. The eye reliefs are not comfortable for long looks and they are always twisting in and out for different reliefs. Kinda heavy also. I wish I would have waited.

  3. #3
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    Vortex has good optics in your price range. I couldn't afford the expensive glass, so I purchased the Vortex Diamondbacks 10x42. They are really good in low light and have not let me down yet. I have looked through them for hours and never had eye fatigue. I'm sure their more expensive $500-$600 range bino's are even better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by twp1224 View Post
    Vortex has good optics in your price range. I couldn't afford the expensive glass, so I purchased the Vortex Diamondbacks 10x42. They are really good in low light and have not let me down yet. I have looked through them for hours and never had eye fatigue. I'm sure their more expensive $500-$600 range bino's are even better.
    I have Vortex and love them dearly. The Razor's are very good (unless you wear glasses than you have to finagle it a bit).

    If I had to do it over again (I baught the Razor's for $550), I would think long and hard about possibley saving the extra $300-$500 to get a pair of Swaro's. I have never looked through a pair, but when EVERYBODY raves about them, that to me says a lot.

    If you need a pair of good/decent glass to hold you off for a while why you save for the high end models I would get the Diamondbacks from Vortex (I had these and gave them to my bro when I upgraded) hands down!

  5. #5
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    I got the Meopta Meostars for $825 shipped. From reading the reviews on Cabelas it sounds like they are pretty close to swaros. I live out in BFN so I've not had the chance to look through swaros. But what I've used of these binos I'm happy with them so far.

  6. #6
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    I have a set of Brunton 10x42 and really like them. The only thing is they are a little heavy but work very well for long periods of glassing!

  7. #7
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    I bought a pair of Nikon Monarchs a few years ago, and really liked them. ($300.00) Until I came into some money, and thought I would buy some good glass. Ended up buying Swarovski EL's and wished all of those years of buying sub par binos I would have saved the money and bought good glass from the start. If you really cannot come up with the extra money for top end, I would suggest going some where you can get all the binos in your price range out and look through all of them outside the store at dusk, to see which pair you like the best.
    Shoot STR8

  8. #8
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    I really love optics. It seems I am always buying, using, or trading some type of optics, especially binoculars. I have owned, or do own many of the binoculars already mentioned in this thread, including Monarchs, Razors, Meostars, and Swaros.

    Common advice given in these situations is that one should just save longer and go with an "alpha" European binocular. I agree that the Big Three Euro optics companies are still making the very best of the best.

    However, other companies have really closed the gap in performance recently. Particularly, ED binoculars coming out of China, have near-alpha images in a bit less-refined build. I have Zen Ray Zen ED2 binoculars. What I can see through my Swaro SLCneus, I can see through my Zens.

    Sometimes saving for years for a $2000 pair of binoculars is impractical, especially when binoculars in the OP's price range are so good. I think $400 to $600 is the "sweet spot" for value with models like the Zens, Vortex Talon HD, Vortex Viper HD, Kruger Caldera, and others available. You pay a lot more for little improvement in performance above this price range.

  9. #9
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    I think that for a lot of us, it just isn't possible to justify spending $1,000+ on a pair of binoculars. I am young and just starting out trying to accumulate the gear that I will need and already have a long list of stuff. Like a pack, spotting scope and tripod, tent, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, coolers, clothing, and on and on. I agree 100% with buying quality equipment, but if i bought top of the line equipment for just the stuff that I listed, I would easily be looking at close to five grand. Plus, id hate to lose a $1,000 pair of binoculars or have them stolen. Just my two cents.

  10. #10
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    elkhunter here is my take on this. I personally like the compact binoculars and find that they are so nice to carry that you have them around you neck ALL THE TIME where I've seen my buddy leave his Sworavski 10x42's in the truck just because they were too heavy to carry, even with the nice shoulder harness he has. Instead he would grab his compact binoculars.

    Leica Ultravid 10x25 compacts. I love them. They are sharp and clear and I think they work just fine for early morning and late afternoon glassing. I believe I paid just a bit more than $600.00 for mine. Again they are very very good binoculars! Find some in a store and have a salesman go outside with you and look through them for a while. I sure like mine! Good Luck!
    David
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    "One loves to possess arms though they hope never to."
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