Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Kalispell, MT
    Posts
    36
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts

    What method do you ask a landowner permission to hunt?

    Looking for input on how others ask landowners for permission? I look at it like a "relationship" and put forth effort to make it last. It helps keep the hunting community in good standing. I tend to do as much research prior by plat maps, google earth, and local fish and game. I try to go before hunting season. I go by myself on Saturday mid morning in decent clothes(no camo). Then try to "sell" myself to secure the privalege to hunt on their land and ask them if they like beef or pork(christmas package). This year I am making business type cards up with all my contact info and picture of my family to give if I get pemission. What do you think, am I on the the right track? Business card cheesy? Something I can do better?
    luck is when opportunity meets preparation...

  2. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Reno Nv
    Posts
    4,435
    Thanks
    1,068
    Thanked 625 Times in 453 Posts
    Congratulations
    184
    Congratulated 79 Times in 9 Posts
    I've done this same thing. There is another thread on this subject as well. I've made some long time friendships with landowners comming to them in this same way. You def need to put the time in as any friendship but even more due to you want somthing out of it. I think if your very respectful and genuine about your motives they will treat you the same way. MOST of the time

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Kalispell, MT
    Posts
    36
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ikeepitcold View Post
    I've done this same thing. There is another thread on this subject as well. I've made some long time friendships with landowners comming to them in this same way. You def need to put the time in as any friendship but even more due to you want somthing out of it. I think if your very respectful and genuine about your motives they will treat you the same way. MOST of the time
    Thanks for the reply Ikeepitcold, do you have the link for that thread? I have searched a couple times but no result.
    luck is when opportunity meets preparation...

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    "I've been to a town Del."
    Posts
    234
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 57 Times in 34 Posts
    Congratulations
    20
    Congratulated 17 Times in 3 Posts
    I like to pattern the landowner and when I figure them out, sneak on and do my thing... LOL! Obviously joking here. I think the business card thing may be a bit overkill. By in large these folks are folks and a straightforward introduction with a firm handshake and honesty are the best bet. I like the no camo bit myself but have knocked on plenty of doors wearing it have had success. The relationship tack is also good. I've done everything from helping brand, building fence, to preg testing cattle to build it. When they see you as someone who is willing to be a neighbor then the access comes much easier. On the business card note; when I lived in the mid-west and hunted waterfowl more than anything else, my group and I printed up business cards labeled Avian Control Specialists and they got varied responses... mostly like, "what the hell is an Avian Control Specialist?" They made some people laugh and that got us on too. I think you are on the right track with your approach. Good Luck.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Grizz is correct when offering to help. I know several people, including myself, that will help work cattle or fix fence to be able to hunt. Just make sure you know what you are doing and do not lie and commit to doing something you are unable to do, or are uncomfortable doing. This will cost the landowner time and possible money, ruining any chances of gaining access.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Sky Country, MT
    Posts
    182
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I always have my "hunting Resume" with me when asking for hunting permission. A simple one page sheet to leave the land owner something to remember you by. I usually ask permission well in advanced. So when I call them a week or days before hunting, they remember who I was because of the "resume" I left them. I also have one for my oldest son as well.

    I have the following info on mine.

    -Contact info (name, phone, address, city email address)
    -Years Hunting (not kills) with bow and with out
    -Favorite animals to hunt (elk, turkey, ect..)
    -Member of (RMEF, DU, Bowhunter Assc, ect...)
    -List of who will be in hunting part along with their info
    -Dates wanting to hunt (with bow or gun)
    -Offer help (pick up trash, fix fence, ect..)
    -Add a one of two pictures of you in the outdoors or with yor family
    -Always write "Thank you for your time" on the bottom and sign it

    Great success so far.
    >>>----------------->
    Strother Inspire
    Gold Tip Kenetics 300
    Ripcord Code Red
    Tight Spot Quiver
    Black Gold Ascent
    Landshark by Simmons Sharks

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Red Bluff Ca
    Posts
    258
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 15 Times in 15 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I think grizz hit it right on the nose with His post offer any help to the landowner whether it be anything and as long you can handle a task that was givin to you as mentioned earlier overall it sounds like you have a great plan!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    The high plains of Colorado
    Posts
    597
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 65 Times in 59 Posts
    Congratulations
    7
    Congratulated 1 Time in 1 Post
    Many years ago, I got very lucky and found two brothers who gave me permission to hunt on their land. I was inexperienced when I asked for permission but I think what gave me an edge is that I knew a little about their farming and cattle business and could carry on a good ( hopefully intelligent ) conversation about some of their work. Everybody just wants to hunt and wants to know where the big deer are but if you don't start with that or don't even ask about the size of the deer and talk about their tractor or how calving went for them. Put yourself in their shoes and ask why I should let you hunt? The other thing that helps, and I can thank my mom and dad for this, I have good manners and I make sure i shake their hand, look them in the eye ( with my sunglasses off ) and call them sir. It is a priviledge to have permission to hunt on someones land, whether they have big deer or not, I try to remember that every time I am on their land.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Unit 12 Landowner Tag
    By Deerslayerok in forum New Mexico
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-21-2012, 08:19 PM
  2. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 06-05-2012, 10:40 AM
  3. Your favorite method - Archery Elk?
    By bz_711 in forum Elk
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-05-2012, 04:05 PM
  4. Colorado landowner voucher
    By Drhorsepower in forum Colorado
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 06-22-2011, 10:49 PM
  5. Landowner tags
    By HuntinFool in forum Utah
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-01-2011, 06:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •