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Thread: Tech Tip!

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    Tech Tip!

    I finally tried this out today. First, you weight sort your arrow lightest to heaviest, and then weight sort your points lightest to heaviest. You then match the heaviest shafts to the lightest points and lightest shafts to heaviest points. You can cut your arrows weight tolerance in half! Now all my finished arrows are within 1 grain of each other!
    2012 Bowtech Insanity CPXL
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    GT Velocity 300's tipped with 125 Shuttle t's weighing 490 grains!!

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    Shooting GT Pro Hunters and Velocity Pro's I general run 1 grain in difference per dozen. But I also use high quality points that are less than 1 grain per dozen in tolerance per dozen.

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    Not wanting to hijack your post, but another good tech tip for ya, to get the spine of your arrows all coming out of the bow the same, put your shafts in the bathtub and float them, they will turn the same way and you can mark them and then fletch them all the same.
    Shoot STR8

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    RUTTIN, can you explain the process.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by RUTTIN View Post
    Not wanting to hijack your post, but another good tech tip for ya, to get the spine of your arrows all coming out of the bow the same, put your shafts in the bathtub and float them, they will turn the same way and you can mark them and then fletch them all the same.
    This will work to a point assuming all arrows are reading true to their spine since floating will only indicate the stiffer side of the arrow not the actual reading. You would have to first check them on a RAM spine tester or equivalent to get an actual spine reading. Another simple way that most forget or don't no about is to nock tune your arrows. I try and do this at the farthest distance you feel comfortable with. Take your dozen arrows and shoot groups with them. You will probably find that there might be a couple that just don't group with the others. So make a note to which ones are outside your normal groups. Then you would just rotate your nock on those arrows to the next vane. Then shoot again and rotate ounce more if you have to. Usually you can get those fliers to group back in with your other arrows. However every ounce in awhile you will get one that will not fly with the rest. This is usually do possibly to a weaker spine than the rest and you would not know it unless you group tune/nock tune your arrows or test them with a RAM spine tester or equivalent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ontarget7 View Post
    This will work to a point assuming all arrows are reading true to their spine since floating will only indicate the stiffer side of the arrow not the actual reading. You would have to first check them on a RAM spine tester or equivalent to get an actual spine reading. Another simple way that most forget or don't no about is to nock tune your arrows. I try and do this at the farthest distance you feel comfortable with. Take your dozen arrows and shoot groups with them. You will probably find that there might be a couple that just don't group with the others. So make a note to which ones are outside your normal groups. Then you would just rotate your nock on those arrows to the next vane. Then shoot again and rotate ounce more if you have to. Usually you can get those fliers to group back in with your other arrows. However every ounce in awhile you will get one that will not fly with the rest. This is usually do possibly to a weaker spine than the rest and you would not know it unless you group tune/nock tune your arrows or test them with a RAM spine tester or equivalent.
    BINGO!.. Nice post On Target. The other thing is, Easton FMJ's don't float so well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChadH View Post
    BINGO!.. Nice post On Target. The other thing is, Easton FMJ's don't float so well.
    Ha Ha, your right, the first time I tried to float my FMJ's I laughed at myself when they hit the bottom. The floating idea has worked pretty well for me as I don't have any of the spine testing equipment. Good points and tips, thanks.
    Shoot STR8

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    FMJ's can bend too...a few grains will not be noticed by 90% of shooters, spine however will affect groups far more. Going to the shooting and numbering arrows system is still the easiest way to findout what you have. My Goldtip Kinentics are all within a gr or less. Even after fletching, even though I shoot the higher grade ones, I still shoot the the entire Dozen to see if I have any flyers! Ones that won't group well. Take these out of your hunting arrows. I have done this for years and only ever had to take out two arrows that would not group well enough to shoot with. A bigger problem is most arrows start breaking down in spine if you shoot a lot.
    I have arrows that have no physical signs of wear, but after a couple thousand shots...have to be tossed. This is if you shoot 7,000 to 10,000 shots a year. I have averaged about 7-10 thousand shots for the last 6 years. Never had an arrow blow up on my bow doing this and flex testing too. You can't do this with FMJ's either, but FMJ's can still blow up. If you get one flying on your groups, get rid of it...good sign it is breaking down and may blow up...at worst you end up with an arrow in you forearm...at best..you do the equal of dry firing your bow.
    Sorry...you guys brought to mine some other thoughts

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    Quote Originally Posted by brandenbowhunter View Post
    FMJ's can bend too...a few grains will not be noticed by 90% of shooters, spine however will affect groups far more. Going to the shooting and numbering arrows system is still the easiest way to findout what you have. My Goldtip Kinentics are all within a gr or less. Even after fletching, even though I shoot the higher grade ones, I still shoot the the entire Dozen to see if I have any flyers! Ones that won't group well. Take these out of your hunting arrows. I have done this for years and only ever had to take out two arrows that would not group well enough to shoot with. A bigger problem is most arrows start breaking down in spine if you shoot a lot.
    I have arrows that have no physical signs of wear, but after a couple thousand shots...have to be tossed. This is if you shoot 7,000 to 10,000 shots a year. I have averaged about 7-10 thousand shots for the last 6 years. Never had an arrow blow up on my bow doing this and flex testing too. You can't do this with FMJ's either, but FMJ's can still blow up. If you get one flying on your groups, get rid of it...good sign it is breaking down and may blow up...at worst you end up with an arrow in you forearm...at best..you do the equal of dry firing your bow.
    Sorry...you guys brought to mine some other thoughts
    Static spine which arrows are measured by will remain for the life of the carbon arrow. I have some GT's that have a ridiculous amount of shots on them. They are over 15 years old and still test true to their spine today. So I hear your point but from my testing I would have to respectfully disagree, at least with the Gold Tip arrows I have tested. Not sure I have any other brands that are quite that old with that amount of shots on them to comment on other manufactures

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    I agree, but I have had a couple different arrow brands that spine did change in...Umm Eastons...for one(cough)
    but spine consistancy will affect the flight of your arrows more than a few grains...was my main point.
    My Goldtips are the best arrows I have found...I also have some XT hunters that have the original logo on them

 

 

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