Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Bitterroot Valley, MT.
    Posts
    564
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 46 Times in 29 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Extreme Angle Photo's

    Does anyone have tips how to take quality pictures of animals (harvested) when you are at an extreme angle/very steep mountain? I have struggled with this forever, and I take pictures to almost an annoying level for those hunting with me. But I absolutely LOVE field photo's.

    Any help is appreciated... Examples of some pics would be nice too...

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Montana For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Reno Nv
    Posts
    4,180
    Thanks
    882
    Thanked 547 Times in 387 Posts
    Congratulations
    65
    Congratulated 6 Times in 5 Posts
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jeff and trents elk 2006 092.jpg 
Views:	261 
Size:	94.8 KB 
ID:	2881
    You can See Guy holding the rope that goes passed his thigh to my buddy behind him with the rope wraped around his waist

    the other pic you can see the rope under my right elbow. We were able to get him turned alittle better and used his leggs to keep him from rolling.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jeff and trents elk 2006 077.jpg 
Views:	229 
Size:	94.3 KB 
ID:	2882

    I will post a couple pics of my Elk that was at such a steep angle we had to tie a rope onto one of the horns and have a guy hold him while we took pics and quartered him. I think the best results are to angle the animal with it's head facing uphill 1/4 away from the camera. this will help keeping the animal from rolling down the hill more. Also we had to put rocks under his belly and chest to keep his legs under himself. I think that the camera should be positioned a bit further away and below center slightly or above center slightly to get a better shot of yourself with the animal. Just my opinion that has worked for me.
    Last edited by Ikeepitcold; 03-05-2012 at 09:40 PM.

  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Bitterroot Valley, MT.
    Posts
    564
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 46 Times in 29 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Pretty good... I like the rope idea and it does serve a lot of purpose too while cleaning. Be sure to post the other pics, I'll watch out for them. Thanks....

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,168
    Thanks
    56
    Thanked 309 Times in 237 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I had to make a shelf out of scree rock to hold this guy on the mountain for the pic:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	037ot2.jpg 
Views:	252 
Size:	97.2 KB 
ID:	2885

  6. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    "I've been to a town Del."
    Posts
    209
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 54 Times in 31 Posts
    Congratulations
    5
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I'm with Bitterroot on this one. On Kodiak it was difficult to keep those early season high country bucks from tumbling and equally difficult to find a place to take a pic. I used a short legged tripod... there are lots of options for this now. And as Bitterroot did in his photo, I went as far as building ledges. The best one was a buck that died just above an old brown bear den and so I just propped him up on the lip of earth the brownie had excavated in the hillside. All these are old pics and none taken with a digital so I can't upload them without a scanner and I'm not that techy! Sorry.

  7. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Bitterroot Valley, MT.
    Posts
    564
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 46 Times in 29 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks everyone... All very good tips. I just watch a Swaro hunting show and they shot a stag on a steep hill. Looks like I'm not the only person that has a hard time with this

  8. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    848
    Thanks
    220
    Thanked 232 Times in 140 Posts
    Congratulations
    18
    Congratulated 48 Times in 6 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Bitterroot Bulls View Post
    I had to make a shelf out of scree rock to hold this guy on the mountain for the pic:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	037ot2.jpg 
Views:	252 
Size:	97.2 KB 
ID:	2885
    That's a great photo!!

  9. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Blue Springs, MO
    Posts
    977
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 130 Times in 105 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 23 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Bitterroot Bulls View Post
    I had to make a shelf out of scree rock to hold this guy on the mountain for the pic:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	037ot2.jpg 
Views:	252 
Size:	97.2 KB 
ID:	2885
    That picture is awesome.
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

  10. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,168
    Thanks
    56
    Thanked 309 Times in 237 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks!

    The Eastmans were kind enough to give me a backpack for that pic.

  11. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    North Umpqua River, Oregon
    Posts
    2,273
    Thanks
    395
    Thanked 476 Times in 296 Posts
    Congratulations
    20
    Congratulated 37 Times in 7 Posts
    That is a great pic BB! My recommendation in steep terrain is to do exactly what BB did in his pic, and that is to stay at the same elevation as the animal, or just very SLIGHTLY uphill or down hill from it and shoot your photo from that angle.
    Grand Slam #1005 + 2: Dall (1986 Yukon), Fannin/Stone (1987 Yukon), Bighorn (1988 Colorado Unit S-26), Stone (1995 British Columbia), Desert (2001 Nevada Unit 161), Bighorn (2009 Wyoming Unit 5)

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Archer extreme carbon vapor quiver NIB $175
    By pcc2b in forum Eastmans' Garage Sale
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-10-2014, 10:08 AM
  2. extreme alaskan outfitter frame pack....
    By andrewlonghi in forum Packs
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-22-2012, 01:15 AM
  3. Was Hoping to get some people from the forum to share some Uneak Animal Photo's
    By N.Y.ArcheryMadMan in forum Wildlife and Landscapes
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 07-28-2012, 05:13 PM
  4. Archer Extreme
    By MN Hunter in forum Bows, Arrows and Equipment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-30-2011, 12:37 PM
  5. Cabelas Alpha Extreme
    By T43 in forum Optics
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-27-2011, 12:06 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •