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  1. #21
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    I have tried Danner's before along with three of my buddies. They are good for hunting back east for whitetails but at least for us they are not the right boot for hiking mountains. We all had bad blisters. Bought a pair of Asolo's after that and they have been awesome. No Blisters! Have had these boots for about 8 years now. The soles are worn but they are still good boots. The guys at REI showed me different ways to lace them and I think that helped as well. May try that with whatever you buy.

  2. #22
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    Depends where you are hunting and what kind of conditions you are experiencing.

  3. #23
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    I wear Danners and Brownings. Use them all over the west. Best advice I have is get boots that FIT and break them in. When I bought my new Danners a year ago, I put my stretchers to work and then started wearing them on my daily walks of 4 to 5 miles. After a couple of weeks they are fine, and never had a blister. (my size is 9 1/2 EEE). I bought a good set of stretchers that I use on all my footwear (except workout shoes) before I wear them. Really helps.

    My Brownings are about 20 years old and I have resoled them 3 times. Still comfortable, but not as waterproof as they once were.
    Last edited by Colorado Cowboy; 04-11-2012 at 07:04 AM.
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

  4. #24
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    Just bought a pair of Kenetreks that I'm really anxious to get out for a break in hike. I also own a pair of LA Sportiva's that i absolutely love.

  5. #25
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    Have had good luck with Vasque breeze if dry. Danner 453 if looking at any wet conditions. The vasque are waterproof for like the first 10-15 miles. I have had 3 sets and all about the same, perfect boot if hot though.

  6. #26
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    I bought a pair of the Kenetrek mountain extremes. I like the design and was surprised to see how much I like the taller tops. They make side-hill hiking easier and offer better support. On flat ground they feel great, but do some climbing and they destroy my heels. Massive blisters. They're stiff boots and I paid a lot for them, so I've been committed to breaking them in. I feel like there's no heel cup in the back. It's just flat. I've done probably 10-15 hikes with them this summer, often going double or triple layer thin socks. This last hike i covered my heel in moleskin and that helped. At first I would only last a mile or two with some steep climbing before the blisters started. Now I'm getting up to 5-6 miles, but certainly not without pain. I bought their weather sealer hoping that would soften them up, which it did a little. Still not good enough, especially if i expect to wear them for a full week of hunting. I read one review where someone said it took about 50 miles before they broke in. He wasn't kidding! I'm probably in that range so far. I'm now hoping they break in before elk hunting in Sept. Starting to consider getting a different brand as backup.

    Now I know why when someone finds a brand that works for their feet they stick with it.

  7. #27
    Senior Member
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    Cabelas Danner ELk Hunter non GTX are very well made but pretty heavy, 5lbs , Cabelas claims 4lbs.They have removable Airthotic in soles. Pronghorns weigh about 4lbs. Elk Ridge boots have Air-bob soles and lace all the way to the toe. They look good with jeans while grocery shopping in Chama

  8. #28
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    I have Danner Pronghorns and the Cabela Outfitters, the pronghorns are the better of the two IMO.. If you want to stay under the 150 range they are comfortable, durable, and keep my feet dry. I also have the Danner Hood Winter Lights ($199 range) and I feel the pronghorns are the best boot I own..

  9. #29
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    My opinions on boots are a little different from what you'll hear from most hunting folks, but I hate Goretex in an early season-type boot (you don't wear your raingear all day, why wear it on your feet all day?). I think it makes your feet sweat more, and then keeps your boots from ever drying out. Skin is waterproof, after all.

    My other tip is to at least consider the weight of your boots. A few more ounces on your boots add up fast - and can increase your fatigue factor and reduce your efficiency. My chosen boots this year (Ahnu Moraga Mesh Mid) weigh 18 ounces apiece, which I feel like is enough for stability/support yet still fairly light.

  10. #30
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    For the most part I concur with HuntPrep365. In AFG, I wore a pair of ASOLO mid hiking boots on patrol with a much heavier load and on rougher terrain that most places I have hunted elk. The only thing to watch out for is a flimsy shank in the sole, it seams like this can lead to much quicker foot fatigue.

    I am a pretty novice elk hunter, but on one trip to Colorado the first few days got close to 80 at 9500ft. Then one morning we woke up to 65 degree temps, by 5pm it was clouding up and by the next morning we had 24 inches of snow. I had uninsulated goretex Danner Pronghorns. I was able to keep hunting, had I been wearing my Asolos I would have been walking out 5 miles to get other boots.

    Later in the season I like my Meindl Denalis.

 

 

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