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  1. #1
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    Your favorite method - Archery Elk?

    What is your favorite method for archery elk?

    I have only been twice - both during last week of archery in CO (3rd week of Sept) and typically very heavy pine timbers with restricted long range viewing. Two years ago there were just enough bugles to chase and stay after them...last year, no bugles and very few sightings?

    When the going gets tough - do you prefer to cover as much ground as possible with higher chance of bumping something, or slow it down and creep knowing that your once sighting might be your only chance?

    I'm all ears!
    -Matt

    "Luck is when preparation meets opportunity"

    "Eighty percent of success is showing up"

    "If you want to achieve Excellence, you can get there today. As of this second, quit doing less-than-excellent work"

  2. #2
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    I like to cover ground when bow hunting elk. Where I hunt they move around quite a bit so its what I have to do to find them. I slow down if I get into really freash sign, but if I'm not seeing any sign or getting any response I'm on the move. I mostly hunt thick timber so seeing a long distance isn't an option.

  3. #3
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    The best method is to get on top of a high vantage point and glass with your binos and a spotting scope for hours. This is a much more effective method than just blindly walking through the forest bumping elk. It also helps you cover more ground quickly. Plus, when you see where the elk are, you know where they are but they don't know where you are which gives you a great advantage for the stalk. Walking and trying to bump elk is a very uneffective way to hunt elk, especially with a bow! Glassing on top of a vantage point is the way to go!!

  4. #4
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    Dhershberger, I couldn't agree more with you BUT, I have similar issues where I hunt as bz_711 does. Those being lots of quiet elk and cover so thick you couldn't pick it apart with napalm. I like to cover ground too and begin very early in the day. Often before light to listen for any possible elk in the area. I do still hunt with my bow and yes, I bump elk. However, I also have slipped up very close to them almost as often as I've spooked them. I grew up still hunting whitetails in the North Woods where deer populations are minimal and the wolves were never "reintroduced" so the deer were always super wary. I must say that sneeking up on an elk vs. sneeking up on a mature whitetail is, hate to say it... easy! That is not saying that still hunting for elk is a super effective method, it is not, but the chances afforded to me doing it have been a thousand fold more than those afforded napping the midday away back in camp! JUST HUNT! An old-timer once told me, hunt low (profile), hunt slow... good rules to live by pilgrim.

  5. #5
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    dhershberger, what would you do, if when you got to your vantage point, it looked like this?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    DIY til I DIE

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vanish View Post
    dhershberger, what would you do, if when you got to your vantage point, it looked like this?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I would take a nap untill 2:00, then eat a good late lunch and still hunt my way back to camp!

    Hopefully you know better than to glass thick timber and save yourself the hike.

  7. #7
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    I don't just go running though the timber hoping to run into elk. Its a little more complex than that. Hunting in close with the elk "IS" an effective method, and my favorite.

  8. #8
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    Where I hunt your not going to see farther than a 100 yds. In Utah the hunt is so early, a lot of times the bulls are not even talking, so it is hard to cover a lot of ground looking(or listening) for a bull. If they are talking then yes I am running and gunning, if the elk are not, I prefer to sit on a wallow as far up the mountain as I can find. The bulls are more apt to come in during the day to wallow up by there beds. This is also where scouting or knowing your area well comes into play. I much prefer to chase them when they are bugling. And sometimes when I am still hunting and bump a herd, I have been able to run as fast as I can parallel to the herd for a couple hundred yards, let things settle down for a few minutes and then give a lost cow call. Sometimes the bull will come back to round up what he thinks is a lost cow. It doesn't always work, but if you have bumped them chances are not all the elk saw you, and if the bull didn't he may come back, what have you got to loose. If you haven't picked up Elk Nuts Playlist book, I suggest you get a copy and you might learn some good tactics in it. It makes for good reading while I sit at those wallows, good luck.
    Shoot STR8

  9. #9
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    My favorite and most succesful way is on horseback. I know not everyone has them or wants them but they sure can take some of the pain out of chasing elk. We ride in then get off and try to get close. Ride, glass, call some....I love it !!


  10. #10
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    Brooks that looks like some awesome elk country! I love hunting terrain that consists of nice open parks, thick timber patches , High elevation, and aspen stands interspersed. Perfect!!

 

 

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