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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ceby7 View Post
    Sitting for hours without moving or making noise? plop myself in a lawnchair, sip on a cocktail, and wait till that elk comes walking out in the next county!
    Neither requires stalking ability but one is somehow better than the other? Picking a place for a stand, setting it up, waiting for a shot etc. all takes skill but so does being able to shoot great distances with success. As mentioned before I don't hunt long range, I don't have the equipment nor do I want it. I enjoy getting to the animals and being out in the wilderness. I feel comfortable at 400 yards if the conditions are perfect but they seldom are and I have passed up shots closer than that because of it. If we want to have more people join our group (hunters) I think we need to be careful where we draw the "that's not ethical" line. The greatest concern I would have is wasting an animal but that happens, with short range shots from arrows as well. Anyone who has hunted very long has lost an animal and its bad there is no other way to describe the feeling. While you may have a problem with someone who shoots 1000 yard they may also have a problem with you "Sitting for hours without moving" and calling it hunting.

  2. #22
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    If I could make my arrows fly that far and hit the mark, just maybe,,,, not. I guess there are some that can make the shot, but my rifle does not want to cooperate with me. I still think that it is too risky unless an animal is bedded. Even then the vitals are somewhat protected most of the time.

  3. #23
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    For me getting close and making a clean, ethical kill is not only part of the skill of hunting it is part of the responsibly we take on as hunters. I know things happen and animals will get wounded, it's part of hunting but I think we all need to do what we can to make sure it happens as infrequently as possible. I wounded a big buck deer about ten years ago by blowing his front leg off with a 650-yard shot. And I have been trained in long-range shooting and can make that shot all day long at the range. I looked for that buck everyday until the end of the hunting season, never found him. He without a doubt died somewhere, like no big buck should have to. Still feel like crap about it and decided right then and there to not to do it again. Shooting 1,000 yards at the range can be a great time, but I don't think big game animals should be used as target practice. I have had the great fortune to take seven Boone and Crockett qualifying big game animals in my life, probably more than any man should be given. All of them were taken at less than 300 yards with an average of only 189 yards each. I guess it just goes to show you don't need to shoot 1,000 yards to kill trophies. Just do what you think is right for the animal, you are taking his life. Just my 2 cents on the subject.
    N. Guy Eastman
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  4. #24
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    I was watching a show (it will be nameless for now) and the hunter said I dont think we can get any closer we better take the shot. It was over 1000 yds on a elk in a open meadow, completly surrounded by tree lines. First off all why couldnt you get any closer? And if for some reason you couldnt get any closer, set up your spotter and see if there is a pattern in what he does and make a move on him at that point. I dont care how much you practice there are to many variables that come into effect with a shot at that range. We all know that "wounding" an animal happens. But there sure isnt as many variables in a 100 yd shot as there is in a 1000yd shot. Everyone should know their weapon of choice and no their limitations. Limitations on the range and in the field are completly different and dont forget that.

    And I agree with the poster before about what a show like this teaches people. How many people do you think watch the show and see how "easy" long distance shooting is and go out and buy a set-up like the one on the show. You can only imagine the outcome of a situation like this.
    Monte Miles
    Beyond Addiction Adventures
    www.beyondaddictionadventures.com

  5. #25
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    with all do respect it is a individual choice I know I couldnt make a 1000 yrd shot and so I dont try but if you pay attention to the BOTW program those guys spend a ton of time building a perfect rest and waiting for the perfect shot yea there is a chance that things could go bad but I have had shots I thought were a slam dunk and something went wrong I think anybody who is honest could say the same thing. No body likes a wounded animal but it happens. I think its awsome to slip in close to a animal but I could see how it would be cool to make a long range sniper shot as well.

  6. #26
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    If all the closer you can get is 600 to 1000 yards on any animal, you need to work on your hunting skills. There is a difference between shooting and hunting and they should remain in different areas. I have seen guys who shoot thousands of rounds a year at the range out to 1000 yards and further and are good miss a shot at an animal at 150 yards because they are not prepared for the emotions. I just dont see any point in the distance shots. If I can get with in 15 yards of a screaming bull or a very skidish speed goat with my bow (and I am terrible at sneaking in, but with patience it has been done), a rifle hunter should be able to get closer than 600 yards easily. I rifle hunt too and can get with in 600 yards with out trying real hard, it just takes a little planing

  7. #27
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    There is absolutely no way that a 1,000 yard is an ethical shot in the field, in fact it shouldn't even be a debate. I did just a little bit of researching online about it and while I am most definitely not an expert, and I can't verify what some guys have said, here is what a few guys said:

    -With a 30 fps change in muzzle velocity at 1,000 yards, it would result in hitting 10 inches low.
    -The bullet will drop about 22 feet.
    -It will take roughly 1.5 seconds or so for the bullet to get there.
    -With a 10 mph crosswind, the bullet can drift from 6-10 feet.

    Soooo, what if your bullet doesn't come out of the barrel at exactly the velocity that you expect it to? What if you range the animal at 1,000 yards, but it is actually 1,020 yards. I don't know how much that bullet will drop in 20 yards, but that far out, I'll bet it is more than 6 or 8 inches. What about the 1.5 seconds that it takes for the bullet to get there? What if the animal takes 1 step forward and now the bullet hits the guts.
    I agree that it'd be cool to try shooting at a 1,000 yards, but ONLY on the range. There is absolutely no way that any hunter should EVER even consider a shot like that.

  8. #28
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    I'm happy to see that most here agree with me on this one. I appreciate everyones opinion. Those who are ok with making the "long" shot on an animal are really missing out on what "hunting" is all about. I've been a bow hunter most of my life here in Wyoming. Always been a spot and stalk guy. I feel very blessed to have expierenced many many encounters with animals at close range (2 to 60yrds) Some resulting in a successful harvest, but most have been the highs and lows of a missed opportunity. I wouldn't give those times up for anything. Good luck to all this fall. Thanks for all the discussion towards this thread.

  9. #29
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    I don't think I am "missing out" on what hunting is all about. We just have different interests; you can keep hunting with your bow and I'll keep hunting with my LR rifles. To each his own.
    Arise... Kill, Eat! - Acts 10:13

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post
    I have to weigh in on this long range shooting. #1. At 800 yards, if you do make a bad shot and wound the elk, what next? Now the elk at 800 plus yards is running. A follow up shot at 800 or 900 yards! Right! #2. A wounded animal 800 yards or more is leaving the country. Now the hunter has to cross the canyon, creek, or down the mountain. So how long will it take this long range shooter to close the distance? I know from my hunting experience that a wounded elk has long legs and leaves the country. Just those two points alone makes shooting long distances unreliable for me. Mike
    That is a valid point, Mike, although I disagree. An elk's will to live is incredible, but that is when their adrenaline kicks in. A gunshot at that range does not really spook elk, or deer for that matter. More often than not, after a long distance shot, they will just stand there looking around. It seems that they're not sure if the sound is dangerous or not. Also, the shot echoes and a lot of times they don't know which way to run. So, #1. If I did make a bad shot, I would most likely have a follow up shot, or the elk would just lay down and eventually die because of no adrenaline to push it. #2. If the elk does run off, there's just as much a chance it runs toward you, than away from you. My hunting experiences have shown me these examples several times. It is pretty funny to watch animals when they aren't sure what to do.
    Arise... Kill, Eat! - Acts 10:13

 

 

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