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  1. #1
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    hunting ethics and traditions

    Are hunting ethics and traditions being lost? With most of us being adults and raising families are we teaching are kids to respect the outdoors and animals. Are we using traditions and ethics when we hunt? And our we passing them down? Should hunter safety classes be teaching more of this? It has been so long since I took hunters safety I don’t remember. I was lucky to hunt a lot with my grandpa who had the upmost respect for the outdoors and all that came with it. But I feel that in this day and age that is being lost. How many people hunt just to kill, or only for the bragging rights. How many times have you heard people laugh when telling a hunting story about shooting legs off and animal getting away. I do not like that attitude at all it is not right and wish those people would not be able to hunt ever again. I would like to hear how you are teaching your kids to respect of the outdoors and to be ethical hunter.

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    Hunter safety perhaps is one good place to learn some ethics and traditions. I'm sure they could do more too in the course. Here in my state I know they discuss hunting ethics in the course. I've taken the hunter safety course a couple times on my end and refresher courses are not that bad of an idea in my opinion. Over the years our hunter safety course has changed for the better than what I remember taking years ago at least here. Hopefully the course will continue getting even better in the future in teaching values and ethics.

    In the end I think we all as parents and as mentors are responsible to talk the talk and walk the walk, continually showing and speaking about such things to our children. It's not just a one time event but an ongoing process to help nurture such things and develop those important attributes in our children. In many ways that phrase, "you are what you eat" applies. What kids are fed both in nutrition and in what they are fed in teaching helps mold them. In the end, children will choose their own path but hopefully that path, with some good guidance won't take them on to many detours or get them going in the wrong direction. I'd like to think so anyways .
    Last edited by Kevin Root; 04-18-2012 at 04:50 PM. Reason: Typo

  3. #3
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    I wish I had a son to pass on what my dad taught me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hunter View Post
    I wish I had a son to pass on what my dad taught me.
    Become a mentor for a young hunter. I'm sure you've accumulated a wealth of outdoor knowledge over the years, and it would be a shame not to pass that on to the next generation. You must know a few young folks out there whose parents don't hunt. If that doesn't interest you, I'll bring my 2 boys out and you can teach us about elk hunting.
    Live to hunt, hunt to live.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrimsonArrow View Post
    Become a mentor for a young hunter. I'm sure you've accumulated a wealth of outdoor knowledge over the years, and it would be a shame not to pass that on to the next generation. You must know a few young folks out there whose parents don't hunt. If that doesn't interest you, I'll bring my 2 boys out and you can teach us about elk hunting.
    I agree. I think Old Hunter would be a great mentor and pass down real tradition and ethics.

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    I've mentioned before that my dad started me hunting in the 50's. We hunted together until he passed away in the 80's. I've hunted alone since then.

    This year will be the first time i'll be hunting with two brothers in their 20's, and their father. I know it's not a youngster, but it's a start for me. We'll be hunting muley's and elk in muzzleloader season.

  7. #7
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    Our hunter safety courses here do a decent job teaching ethics but nothing replaces the experiance in the field with an ethical hunter.
    I try to discuss with my boys why I did or did not take a shot...I was fortunate enough to have my youngest boy with me for a few days on a archery bull hunt and we called in several bulls and discussed which presented a good shot and why the others did not. I also enjoy watching Team Primos with my boys, they seem to do the best explaining what there doing and why. They offer mentoring camps thru the Game and Fish Department here, I hope to have my boys participate in one of these camps so they here it from others than just..DAD.
    Confidence is contagious, so is the lack of - Vince Lombardi

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZbwhuntr View Post
    Our hunter safety courses here do a decent job teaching ethics but nothing replaces the experiance in the field with an ethical hunter.
    I try to discuss with my boys why I did or did not take a shot...I was fortunate enough to have my youngest boy with me for a few days on a archery bull hunt and we called in several bulls and discussed which presented a good shot and why the others did not. I also enjoy watching Team Primos with my boys, they seem to do the best explaining what there doing and why. They offer mentoring camps thru the Game and Fish Department here, I hope to have my boys participate in one of these camps so they here it from others than just..DAD.
    Good job. What our dads teach us really stays with us. I can still hear my dad saying.....that's not a shot you want to take son.

 

 

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