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Thread: Packing in

  1. #11
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    Buy your gear and then your pack

    The comment above about it depending on how lightweight your gear is was a critical one. Don't worry about what size pack to get until you get what will go into it. One person may be able to fit his standard gear (sleeping bag and pad, tent, cooking gear, clothes, water filter, etc.) and the food to be taken into a 5000 cubic inch bag while someone taller or or with bulkier gear may need a 6500 or 7500 cubic inch pack for the same list of equipment.

    Once you have your core set of equipment lay it out with something the same size as the food you will be taking into a rectangular cube and then measure it to see how many cubic inches you will need. Also, keep in mind that most backpack manufacturers measure the capacity of their packs based on a fully stuffed calculation which takes into account stretching. This means that a bag that is 10" x 10" x 20", or 2000 cubic inches might be rated as 2200 because you can jam 2200 ci's of stuff into it, so get something that is 10-20% larger that what your rectangular cube measures. This will also make it easier to pack for the trip out and you are sitting on ground stuffing stuff into your pack bag rather than carefully putting it in just the right place.

    Also, many packs have expansion collars on the top that they use to get their full volume, so the main pack bag may be 3000 ci's but with the expansion collar it goes up to 5000 ci's...but it is also 12 inches taller which makes it go over your head. If you are normal sized you may not like this design and might prefer a pack that is wider than some others.

    Hope this helps,

    Larry

  2. #12
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    I use a 5000 and think its plenty, as for feeling that you have to fill the space, just stick to your list and keep in mind that you will hopefully have it overstuffed with meat after getting your animal!

  3. #13
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    If you want everything in your pack then get a 4500+ and if you don't mind stuff on the outside of the pack then I use a 2800.But I have all my gear in titanium{took a few year to get it due to the cost}and the lightest gear i can get.
    Can you handle the challenge.... hunt hard but safe!!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ikeepitcold View Post
    I agree with the 5k but remember if you go bigger guys tend to want to fill it causing extra weight.
    yep.... just be prepared to be ruthless about every ounce you can possibly save. After you have shaved off every ounce you can, THEN you can go back and add luxury items. If you just jump in and start figuring out your kit on the fly you will rationalize a bunch of stuff you won't really use by saying "oh, it's only 1/2 oz. I might need that). It all adds up. I've found cut it all down to absolute minimum, then try it out on some overnighters. Once you have a baseline kit add a few luxury items (like for me I HAVE to stick in a block of cheddar cheese) and you won't go overboard as easily.

    I have a 6500 ci and a 3000 I use for day hunts and plan on using for 2-3 day "short" hunts.
    Last edited by ChadH; 07-22-2012 at 07:41 PM.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChadH View Post
    yep.... just be prepared to be ruthless about every ounce you can possibly save. After you have shaved off every ounce you can, THEN you can go back and add luxury items. If you just jump in and start figuring out your kit on the fly you will rationalize a bunch of stuff you won't really use by saying "oh, it's only 1/2 oz. I might need that). It all adds up. I've found cut it all down to absolute minimum, then try it out on some overnighters. Once you have a baseline kit add a few luxury items (like for me I HAVE to stick in a block of cheddar cheese) and you won't go overboard as easily.
    How do you keep the cheese from getting nasty? Or is that for short hunts only? I've been trying to figure out what kind of cheese I could take to put on a bagel with some salami, to break up the monantany of of peanut butter and honey.

  6. #16
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    I take string cheese or the little individual packets of cheese sticks. They stay fresher longer and easier to pack

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKC View Post
    I take string cheese or the little individual packets of cheese sticks. They stay fresher longer and easier to pack
    I've never had a problem with cheese keeping for the number of days we are talking about (say up to 10), realistically it is going to be gone in probably 5 days, it keeps just fine. I buy a chunk of chedder and if the end is a little "dried out" buy the last day shave it off, but usually you are eating a slice often enough it is fine. A good chedder doesn't melt easily, it isn't "greasey" so it is about perfect for me. The string cheese is very handy to pack, but it's a little to "processed" for my liking. Tastes ok though.
    Last edited by ChadH; 07-23-2012 at 11:23 AM.

  8. #18
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    I think the first question I would have is are you going early season archery or 3rd rifle season - climate being the critical component. I hunt out of a Badlands 2800 for 3-5 archery bivy hunts and have room enough to lash in the first hindquarter between the bat wing compartments on the pack back to the truck after the kill. Personally, bigger packs are too much temptation to pack gear that you aren't going to use anyways but still have to carry around for the better part of a week. Sitka 32 would be another pack that would perform nicely for a lengthy early season backcountry hunt.

  9. #19
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    Are a lot of you eating the dehydrated meals? Also trying to figure out our 2013 CO rut hunt, for food. the Mtn House Meals say 2 servings but is it more like 1 hearty meal? Plan on taking meals, gran. bars, string cheese...any other good high cal foods you've found? We plan on hiking in for as many days as possible without coming back out for supplies. What are some of your packs you're using?

  10. #20
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    Yes, I eat mountain house and 2 servings is a lot of food but you will need the calories. I am doing my first backcountry elk hunt is 3 weeks and my pack is a Mystery Ranch 6500. I have left over room but it is a bomb proof pack!! They tend to be a little heavy but I have been training with 85 pounds in the pack and it handles it with no problem. We are staying 8 days to give you some prospective pack with all gear is right at 50 pounds.

 

 

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