Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    The Golden State
    Posts
    1,363
    Thanks
    33
    Thanked 71 Times in 71 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Incline and Decline Shots

    With most of us living out west, we are blessed to hunt in some of the most beautiful terrain our country has to offer. We pursue game from rolling foothills to high elevation,rugged steep canyons.

    The shots we make are not always flat, like at your local shooting range. Dose anyone have tips or a system that works for incline and decline shots? What is your preferred way to practice these shots before hunting season?
    -NRA Life Member
    -Wild Sheep Foundation, <1 club

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Buena Vista, Co.
    Posts
    1,137
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 52 Times in 38 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Never did practice them. When they pop up hunting I shoot a little low.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    242
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 4 Times in 1 Post
    I do not have a system. Based on yardage (either up or down) on the rangefinder and nowing what my drop is on my rifle I estimate. The steeper the angle the more I take of on yardage. In reality with a fairly flat shooting round your hold should not be too far off.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So.Cal., but don't hold that against me...UPDATE, soon to be NM
    Posts
    93
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Both responses nailed it. The amount of gravity affecting a bullets performance when shooting a steep incline or decline will make the bullet act like the yardage is closer. Its hard to explain, but easier to understand with a drawing. If you take point A (being your location) point B (the target location)
    A ========= (Horiziontal line = 180 yards)
    ---- *
    -------- *
    ----------- *
    ------------- *
    -----------------B (line of sight 240 yards)

    The amount of gravity affecting the bullet is the distant of the straight line horiziontally between the two rather than the distant from line of sight, so to make a long story short, aim lower (as if the target is closer). And as JNDEER mentioned, it doesn't matter if the target is up or down.
    Last edited by NoMoreOldNo7; 05-02-2012 at 11:33 AM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    155
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by NoMoreOldNo7 View Post
    Both responses nailed it. The amount of gravity affecting a bullets performance when shooting a steep incline or decline will make the bullet act like the yardage is closer. Its hard to explain, but easier to understand with a drawing. If you take point A (being your location) point B (the target location)
    A ========= (Horiziontal line = 180 yards)
    ---- *
    -------- *
    ----------- *
    ------------- *
    -----------------B (line of sight 240 yards)

    The amount of gravity affecting the bullet is the distant of the straight line horiziontally between the two rather than the distant from line of sight, so to make a long story short, aim lower (as if the target is closer). And as JNDEER mentioned, it doesn't matter if the target is up or down.
    That is a great drawing.
    An easy way to think about it, as well, is that gravity only works perpendicular (vertical) to the earths level surface. the bullet will only be affected in this direction by gravity, so horizantal distance only affects the time the bullet, or arrow, is in the air i.e. the time that gravity has to act on the object.
    The vertical distance to angle distance will always be d=R*cos(theta), where R is the actual line of sight distance, and theta is the angle. easy things to remember are that cos(30)=sqrt(3)/2~~.87 and cos(45)~~.71
    so if you are shooting 100yds at an angle of 30degrees, then this is like shooting 87yds horizontal. 100yds at an angle of 45degrees is like 71yds horizontal.

    Just remember those two numbers and you should be pretty good with a fairly flat shooting rifle.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    So.Cal., but don't hold that against me...UPDATE, soon to be NM
    Posts
    93
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Now all that being said unless the distance is way out there (maybe in excess of 400 yards) the path of the bullet won't be affected that much, at least with my rifle sighted in at 200 yards. Anything beyond 300 yards in that circumstance I would reconsider the shot and try to get closer or pass on the shot.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    547
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 83 Times in 68 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 37 Times in 2 Posts
    You can buy an angle measurement tool that mounts onto your rifle. Once you get the angle plug it into a ballistic calculator and you will have your adjusted yardage. Another way is to get a rangefinder with the angle compensation. See the thread titled "High Country Range Finder".
    A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    Shoot the best, Shoot PSE!

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Buena Vista, Co.
    Posts
    1,137
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 52 Times in 38 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    It's all relative to what you're shooting. I shoot a slow poke muzzleloader. So, i'm affected at short distances.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    951
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 48 Times in 38 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    ACI Indicator. Works pretty slick.
    Arise... Kill, Eat! - Acts 10:13

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Bitterroot Valley, MT.
    Posts
    567
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 46 Times in 29 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Nice post... Informational.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Montana For This Useful Post:


 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Archery Hunting Mule Deer- Steep Angled Shots!
    By ScottR in forum Ask The Eastmans'
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 04-17-2014, 10:04 PM
  2. Call your shots!
    By Never in Doubt in forum California
    Replies: 49
    Last Post: 11-13-2013, 05:04 PM
  3. Shots fired. T3 338.
    By ThreeTikkas in forum Guns, Muzzleloaders and Ammo
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-03-2012, 07:09 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •