View Poll Results: Should I get a single pin for hunting?

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  • Yes

    6 33.33%
  • No

    12 66.67%
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhershberger View Post
    That still has way to many what if's and unknowns for me! When you practice at home at 50 yds., you dial in for 50 yds.! You don't dial in for 30 yds and then shoot at 50 yds so you can try to guess how far the arrow drops! It really is not ethical to shoot at an animal at fifty yards when you sight is dialed in for thirty because there is a good chance that your arrow hits to high or to low and you end up wounding the animal. Eliminate the guess work and get a spot hogg five pin!
    I heat what your saying but I don't stand in my backyard shooting a bag at 50 with the pin set at 30. I go shoot 3d 1-2 times a week where I get to shoot at life size bull at 50 yards using the 30 yard pin constantly making kill shots. Not to mention all the other animals with uphill and downhill shots at verying yardages. Practice makes perfect. The guys who haven't shot single pin won't ever get it but your missing out. If you put the time and effort in to learn where your arrow will hit between 20 and 50 yards there's nothing unethical about. Different strokes for different folks

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  3. #22
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    I have used a multi pin my whole life until about 2-3 years ago. Eyes just aren't what they used to be and find myself more accurate with one and to me accuracy is first in my book. I read through a few of these posts and the biggest complaint is having to readjust your sight on something at the last minute. Another is forgetting to dial in your sight at the correct yardage. These are easy to fix and will take some time, it's called knowing your equipment. I'm not going to lie to you, it will take some time to get efficient with a single pin when you make the change but once you do, I doubt you would go back to a multi pin.

  4. #23
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    I love my MBG Ascent with 3 pins. I have them set at 20, 30, 40 and the 40 is the pin sighted in for the slide. It can be adjusted from 15yds-90yds. If I want to shoot past 90 yds im going to need to get another pin, or reduce the range on the lower end.

    love it. best of both worlds

  5. #24
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    I can understand where you advocates for a single pin are coming from. Like everything, practice makes perfect. And the biggest hurdle is getting over your fear of trying something new...

    With that said, I'm a chickensh!t. I will stick with what works for me (5 pin sights). Like somebody has said, too many "what ifs" IMO, for me to see any of the benefits of a single pin.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuntOregon View Post
    I heat what your saying but I don't stand in my backyard shooting a bag at 50 with the pin set at 30. I go shoot 3d 1-2 times a week where I get to shoot at life size bull at 50 yards using the 30 yard pin constantly making kill shots. Not to mention all the other animals with uphill and downhill shots at verying yardages. Practice makes perfect. The guys who haven't shot single pin won't ever get it but your missing out. If you put the time and effort in to learn where your arrow will hit between 20 and 50 yards there's nothing unethical about. Different strokes for different folks
    Good post! Anyone who shoots their equipment lots learns how to shoot it well. There was just as much "learning curve" to shooting a multi-pin well it was just long enough ago that most of us have forgotten how hard it was by now and the multi pins are second nature. The same is true with a single pin. It becomes second nature when you put the effort in to shooting it day in and day out.

    A couple of additional points for Dhersberger.... if you want a "sure thing" don't be a bow hunter. It is by nature full of "what if's". If you don't like "what if's" FOR SURE never pick up a recurve.

    Chad

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  8. #26
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    I have never used one, that being said I can't say yes or no. I would definitely try it out though. I am very comfortably with my 6 pin set up right now though, it is so ingrained what pin to shoot at for what distance it might be tough to change.

  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChadH View Post
    Good post! Anyone who shoots their equipment lots learns how to shoot it well. There was just as much "learning curve" to shooting a multi-pin well it was just long enough ago that most of us have forgotten how hard it was by now and the multi pins are second nature. The same is true with a single pin. It becomes second nature when you put the effort in to shooting it day in and day out.

    A couple of additional points for Dhersberger.... if you want a "sure thing" don't be a bow hunter. It is by nature full of "what if's". If you don't like "what if's" FOR SURE never pick up a recurve.

    Chad
    You are right Chad H. There are a lot of unknowns and "what if's" in bowhunting but I like to try to to minimize the amount of what if's and unknowns as much as possible and I think a five pin sight does that much better than a single pin sight. Sometimes shots happen very quickly in bowhunting and I want to be able to draw, pick a pin, and shoot rather than have to adjust my sight right at the moment of truth. I know that there is no "sure thing" in bowhunting but having the right gear can really multiply your odds for success! Minimizing your amount of unknowns and what if's in bowhunting is very important. I'm not being confrontational, I'm just stating my opinion.

  10. #28
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    I shoot a single pin, and don't like the clutter of the multiple pins, although I only had cheapo multi pin sights when I was younger. I know where to aim with my pin set at 30 yards to cover 10-40 yards. I practice it all the time so if I can't adjust it I am set. I started out shooting recurves with no sights. It's about the same thing. If I have to reach out, beyond 40, I usually have time to make a quick adjustment. I like it, but I am going to look at the newer higher quality multi pin sights. It is a drag if you shoot at 50 yards and forget to set it back to 30. Oops

  11. #29
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    i watched a guy yesterday,with a single pin, make a 120 yard shot, he hit bout 6 inches low but good god! 120 yards!!!? the dude didnt even use a range finder, he looked at the target, looked at the trees adjusted the sight and the arrow whent airborne. that was neat. then i raised my 70 yard pin way over the back and made myself look stupid. ha not saying the single pin allowed him to shoo tthat far but it was pretty cool how he was able to field guess that far. good thing it was just a target but non the less, cool

  12. #30
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    I used to have a multiple pin sight (sword) and loved it. Then a pro shop talked me into using a HHA and I have been using it for quite some time now. I've tried going back to a fixed pin sight, but after using the single pin for so long, it is honestly like starting over for me. Yes, you can forget to adjust it to the correct yardage, but you can easily use the wrong pin when looking at 5 different ones that are becoming closer together with today's high speed bows. As ontarget7 mentioned, the bottom line is to shoot what is working for you and most importantly, know your equipment.

 

 

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