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  1. #1
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    Adjustable Objective vs. Quality

    If you are buying a scope, and money is an object to a degree, and the intended use is hunting out to say 500 yards max (& probably way less more often than not) would you spend the extra money to get an adjustrable objective scope or use that same money to but a little bit higher quality scope -- or do neither and save the money for the nex thing you (think you) "need."

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    If you give us a budget, the caliber, and intended target, we could give you some options.

    FWIW, an adjustable objective is nice for certain types of shooting, but for most hunting 500 and in, it is completely unnecessary.

    You can usually get the most scope for your money in the 3-9X40 configuration, which is plenty of magnification for big game hunting out to 500 yards.

    Glass quality trumps magnification every time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitterroot Bulls View Post
    If you give us a budget, the caliber, and intended target, we could give you some options.

    FWIW, an adjustable objective is nice for certain types of shooting, but for most hunting 500 and in, it is completely unnecessary.

    You can usually get the most scope for your money in the 3-9X40 configuration, which is plenty of magnification for big game hunting out to 500 yards.

    Glass quality trumps magnification every time.
    Bitterroot Bulls has it right. Not one of my big game scopes (mostly Leupold VX-3 with B&C reticle) has an adjustable objective and I've run the gamut of shots in the past few years, from 23 yards last year on a Nebraska whitetail doe all the out to just shy of 400 yards on a South African gemsbok bull in 2010. Will you have a bit of parallax? Sure. Is it enough to take you completely off target with otherwise good shooting form. Probably not.

    Now, with my higher magnification prairie dog rigs I do run an adjustable objectives on slightly lower priced optics. That's because 1) I'll take a shot at a prairie dogs just about as far as I can dial in dope, so I need the magnification and 2) the bright daylight shooting conditions conducive to most prairie dog hunts don't really stress the optics quality, at least as far as low light conditions (not to mention that mirage is a far more brutal problem in those conditions). Those guns feature either Leupold VX-II with 1/8 MOA target dot and target turrets or Weaver Grand Slam glass. Regardless, when you make a choice like I did, you have to recognize every step down in optic quality combined with increased magnification is a double hit: more magnification with lower quality glass only makes things tougher, especially in low light.

    Bottom line: in a target rich enviroment with a fairly dumb critter that will often allow for a follow-up shot after a bullet impacts just shy of his feet (read: prairie dogs), you can get away with trading off some optical quality for feature like higher magnification and/or and adjustable objective. However, if you need strong low light performance and you've busted your butt to get within closing distance of a worthy big game animal, the last thing you want is poor glass hindering a good shot for the sake of an adjustable objective.
    Last edited by Six-Gun; 07-28-2012 at 06:53 PM.

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    Thank you both. That pretty much answers my question: "FWIW, an adjustable objective is nice for certain types of shooting, but for most hunting 500 and in, it is completely unnecessary." Was looking at Vortex Diamondback in 4-12; intended target is antelope first, then maybe deer. Currently they are on sale for $200 (bdc) and you can get one with AO for another $100 (that's about my budget). Putting on, most likely, a Savage 11 in .260 rem. Thanks again for the advice.

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    No problem at all. Best of luck with your setup; let us know how it turns out.

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    If it were me, and my budget was $300,

    I would bump up to the Vortex Viper 3-9X40 BDC. The Viper series has comparable glass to the VX-3 line from Leupold.

    http://swfa.com/Vortex-3-9x40-Viper-...pe-P51895.aspx

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    BB, do you consider the Viper line a significant step up from the Diamondback?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murdy View Post
    BB, do you consider the Viper line a significant step up from the Diamondback?
    Yes. And I like the Diamondback line.

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  12. #9
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    I have both types on my Leupold VXIIIs. Six gun hit the nail on the head. I do have an AO on my 4.5x14 on my .300 Wby and when I am hunting I usually have it set on the "Infinity" setting. The last thing I need to be doing when a shot opportunity is there is fiddling with that adjustment. Unless the animal is a lot further than I normally shoot, I don't use my range finder either. I do set the AO at the range when I am shooting as I get a sharper image and can see the bullet holes in the target easier.
    Colorado Cowboy
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    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

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    Quote Originally Posted by Colorado Cowboy View Post
    I have both types on my Leupold VXIIIs. Six gun hit the nail on the head. I do have an AO on my 4.5x14 on my .300 Wby and when I am hunting I usually have it set on the "Infinity" setting. The last thing I need to be doing when a shot opportunity is there is fiddling with that adjustment. Unless the animal is a lot further than I normally shoot, I don't use my range finder either. I do set the AO at the range when I am shooting as I get a sharper image and can see the bullet holes in the target easier.
    CC, setting the focus to infinity will add some unnecessary parallax (although not huge amounts) at common hunting ranges under 200 yards. Also, your scope will not be performing at its highest levels at those ranges. I would recommend setting the focus somewhere between 100 and 200 yards, which is a good balance, and also what manufacturers set their non-AO scopes at the factory.

 

 

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