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  1. #1
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    How do Bulls attract Cows

    and how do you take advantage of that to "git er done"
    I Love the smell of Elk in the mornin
    The arrow is everything

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    Actually the cows attract the bulls when they go into estrus. Once the bull has his herum of cows he will call them back to him with different types of bugles should they get split up. To take advantage, Spend time in the woods with the elk,learn how to call properly if your going to use that strategy. The elk around here are getting very very call savy from many hunters educating them with their attempts at sounding like an elk. That doesn't mean you cant call em in if you know what your doing. I've had way better luck letting the elk call me into them. Once I'm in their circle, i let the situation dictate whether I'm gonna bugle,cow call, or just sneak in for the shot.

  3. #3
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    i see your point there but it is my understanding that the cow chooses the bull so...would not the chosen
    bulls have favorable charactaristics and sounds to a receptive cows liking over other bulls in the area? if so that bull has to have something that the cow likes and attracted her to him ultimately.
    I Love the smell of Elk in the mornin
    The arrow is everything

  4. #4
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    The dominant bull will get the most cows no matter how much they are attracted to other bulls because the "Herd Bull" or most dominant will fight off the lesser satelite bulls and move them away from his cows.

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    Branch bulls usually summer away from the cows. As the rut draws near, bachelor herds of branch bulls will disband, start rubbing and bugling, to advertise their location to cows while they search for those cows. As the estrus cycle approaches, bulls and cows double their efforts in finding each other. Sometimes an inferior bull will find the cows first and will try his best to get the deed done, but if a more dominant bull enters the scene the lesser bull or bulls will be driven away, and he will wait in the wings for his shot that may never come. That's when you find groups of spikes that have been kicked to the curb until the rut is over and they can reunite with their mommy. Sometimes spikes never reunite, and wander seeking their own fortune. If its a very large herd of cows there may be many satellite bulls dogging the herd, and even breeding cows when the herd bull is preoccupied with fending off other bulls. Some times where the elk numbers are low the lesser bull will keep moving looking for his own cows again, or even keeping them and breeding them if they aren't found by a more dominant bull. That's the run down of what Ive seen in the areas where "I" hunt, and I'm sure other hunters have had many neat and different experiences in their areas.
    Dirk Durham
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    www.elk101.com

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    Its been my expierence that the herd bulls will actually allow the lesser bulls to hang with the cows early on prior to the heat of the rut. The younger bulls will march around acting the role of the big dog but as soon as the cow(s) come into estrus the big boys will move in and push off the satelites. The cows attract the bulls, the herd bull then fights to keep his cows. You really dont see the cows running off to another bull unless that bull sneaks in and pushes her away or whips the herd bull for rights to that group of cows.

  7. #7
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    Trophyhill, can you be more specific?-------- Good info being shared here as to the gathering process, Bulls come to the Cows as their Testosterone levels rise & they feel urges of the rut increase, some escalate quicker than others as they are not programmed robots! Sorta like teenagers! Watch cats & dogs as well, it's the males that travel great distances as a females scent can get into the air! (grin) As cows start showing the early signs of estrus this can & does attract bulls towards them, the cows do not start seeking out bulls as a rule. Sure they will be attracted to bulls once the bulls have made themselves available by some leaving bachelor groups while other smaller bachelor groups will stay intact & head to where the cow groups are. Many of these groups can entertain 1-5 bulls as they all are with these cows! These bulls are all tolerated within this group until these cows show real breeding is needed, this is when more dominant bulls can show on the scene & all will know their station or pecking order & where they stand in the scheme of things!

    This can vary from area to area as not every area supports big dominant bulls because of heavy hunting pressure. So as some herds may have bigger bulls there are only so many to go around & it's common to see 5X5 as the herd bull throughout Sept. where bull to cow ratio's suffer. This is especially so on OTC public Land hunts.

    Is your question though more of one how does a bull without cows try & attract cows their way?

    ElkNut1

  8. #8
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    Is your question though more of one how does a bull without cows try & attract cows their way?

    ElkNut1


    in a nutshell, yes. great responses so far though. i was under the impression that the cow chooses the bull she wants to breed with so my thought process in my little elkbrain took me to the conclusion that if this is true, the bull has to do something to attract the cow(s) to him.
    Last edited by trophyhill; 02-27-2011 at 10:07 AM.
    I Love the smell of Elk in the mornin
    The arrow is everything

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    Yeah i've always thought the cows attract the bulls but the bulls will then choose which cow he wants by running off the ones he's not interested in, maybe they are not hot enough yet? After he has chose which cows will be part of his harem this is when learning the different calling techniques becomes crucial! One trick i've learned to beat the call shy bulls is use reeds, most anyone can use a Primos "flute" but not everyone can use reeds, you can manipulate the sounds so much more with reeds and sound like a variety of animals with one tiny call, not only does this save on weight its also not so much of a pain in the butt fumbling with calls! We used this tactic all last season and we were calling in bulls left and right while others went all season in the same area without hearing a bugle!

  10. #10
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    Trophyhill, lets back up just a bit. In general, cows are attracted to a specific bull via his precieved fitness to supply quality genetics. Large antlers indicate a bull is able to procure enough minerals and protein to sustain quality antler growth. It also indicates an abilty to preserve through winters, follow migration patterns, avoid predators etc. Antler is what is termed as a "luxury tissue". That is biologically antler growth is a non-priority tissue. A bull must first be able to supply his bodies priority needs, so large antlers indicate over all fitness. Bugles, in general, indicate to cows that a bull may or may not be worth having a look at. Most herd bulls bugle a great deal to "imprint" thier bugles on their cows. However, large antlers and robust bugles alone do not dictate herd bull status, the willingness and abilty to defend the harem against competitor bulls is imperative. Bulls defend the harem in two ways, either by physically pushing cows away from competition, or by fighting rival bulls off physically or with threats. Cows through the selection process want to breed with the best representive of the species they can. This is where Elknuts theory of cow call aways comes in.
    Two Bear Outfitters

 

 

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