Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 29
  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    518
    Thanks
    317
    Thanked 63 Times in 52 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by buckbull View Post
    I believe the sportsman act of 2012 was going to address a lot of land locked land and create easements. It is very unfortunate that it did not pass.

    update: The act was going to open up 32 million land locked acres
    The bill didn't pass because the ranching/outfitting industry dominates the Wyoming legislature. The landlocked public land is their personal playground if they have a grazing lease. they have access 24/7/365 but we sportsmen don't.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Dolores, Colorado
    Posts
    2,585
    Thanks
    173
    Thanked 429 Times in 323 Posts
    Congratulations
    18
    Congratulated 2 Times in 2 Posts
    One of the ranches I hunt and an adjoining ranch have 3 school (state) sections totally surrounded and locked up. Each one is 640 acres (1 sq mile)and the one I don't hunt has an outfitter and yep....its their private playground! Its kinda funny because I have hunted the adjoining ranch for years and because one side of 1 of the state parcel borders the ranch. The other ranch has it fenced and posted. I just climb the fence and go hunting. The outfitter stopped me one year and was really ticked off because I had killed a really nice buck deer that he wanted for a client. When he saw that the adjoining ranch owner had signed my license and I told him it was state land that I had legal access to, he stomped off swearing ti himself.

    Moral of the story is you have to know what you can & can't do.
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    North Umpqua River, Oregon
    Posts
    2,318
    Thanks
    406
    Thanked 498 Times in 312 Posts
    Congratulations
    49
    Congratulated 56 Times in 8 Posts
    I think a great business for someone in SE Wyoming would be a helicopter drop service, to drop you into landlocked BLM. I know I would easily pay $500/person round trip for say 2 to 3 guys, just so they came back to pick us back up...lol.
    Grand Slam #1005 + 2: Dall (1986 Yukon), Fannin/Stone (1987 Yukon), Bighorn (1988 Colorado Unit S-26), Stone (1995 British Columbia), Desert (2001 Nevada Unit 161), Bighorn (2009 Wyoming Unit 5)

  4. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    518
    Thanks
    317
    Thanked 63 Times in 52 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Umpqua Hunter View Post
    I think a great business for someone in SE Wyoming would be a helicopter drop service, to drop you into landlocked BLM. I know I would easily pay $500/person round trip for say 2 to 3 guys, just so they came back to pick us back up...lol.
    Hunter, someone did just that some years ago and a fistfight ensued. Not sure of the outcome, but the rancher should have been charged. The guy was clearly legal.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    518
    Thanks
    317
    Thanked 63 Times in 52 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Colorado Cowboy View Post
    One of the ranches I hunt and an adjoining ranch have 3 school (state) sections totally surrounded and locked up. Each one is 640 acres (1 sq mile)and the one I don't hunt has an outfitter and yep....its their private playground! Its kinda funny because I have hunted the adjoining ranch for years and because one side of 1 of the state parcel borders the ranch. The other ranch has it fenced and posted. I just climb the fence and go hunting. The outfitter stopped me one year and was really ticked off because I had killed a really nice buck deer that he wanted for a client. When he saw that the adjoining ranch owner had signed my license and I told him it was state land that I had legal access to, he stomped off swearing ti himself.

    Moral of the story is you have to know what you can & can't do.
    Cowboy, we have a certain ranch around these parts that is leased by an outfitter and has "No Trespassing" signs posted on a fence that has 3 MILES of BLM ground on the other side. The outfitter & ranch hands try to blow smoke about calling the sheriff, but usually shut up when they see the GPS...but sometimes not. And it's always a hassle, even if you're right.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Blue Springs, MO
    Posts
    1,022
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 157 Times in 120 Posts
    Congratulations
    3
    Congratulated 24 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Umpqua Hunter View Post
    I think a great business for someone in SE Wyoming would be a helicopter drop service, to drop you into landlocked BLM. I know I would easily pay $500/person round trip for say 2 to 3 guys, just so they came back to pick us back up...lol.
    My cousin flies airplanes, it doesn't take much of a flat spot to land a Cessna, right? Maybe I'll request that he learns to fly a choppa.
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Dolores, Colorado
    Posts
    2,585
    Thanks
    173
    Thanked 429 Times in 323 Posts
    Congratulations
    18
    Congratulated 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by shootbrownelk View Post
    Cowboy, we have a certain ranch around these parts that is leased by an outfitter and has "No Trespassing" signs posted on a fence that has 3 MILES of BLM ground on the other side. The outfitter & ranch hands try to blow smoke about calling the sheriff, but usually shut up when they see the GPS...but sometimes not. And it's always a hassle, even if you're right.
    I understand what you are saying totally. I guess if I was in that situation, I would plan ahead and go talk to the county sheriff and get his take on the situation before you climb the fence. Depends on how determined you are to hunt that particular spot.
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Sterling, Colorado
    Posts
    251
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 31 Times in 28 Posts
    Congratulations
    2
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Welcome to the west.....hundred of thousands of acres of public land surrounded by private property and there is no way to access it unless you fork over the big bucks to the ranchers or outfitters. As long as these hoodlums are as powerful as they are in the legislature in their states, it will never change.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    229
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 41 Times in 37 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    The GPS's with the chips are a step in the right direction. However, I have been involved in one case where the GPS was flat wrong and the ranch manager was right. It just depends on what map the chip-maker looks at I guess . . . If we are going to pay that kind of money for a gps and chip, you would think we'd have accuracy on our side . . .

    The chopper and plane idea put a new spin on "gas money"!

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    The high plains of Colorado
    Posts
    597
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 65 Times in 59 Posts
    Congratulations
    7
    Congratulated 1 Time in 1 Post
    I was on a public road that went thru private property looking for access to a section of state land and found the road just went by the corner of this piece of land. I had my truck parked on the road and was standing in the ditch ( 10' from my truck ) leaning on the corner post, which was posted state land. The wire gate at the corner was permanently wired shut and had a length of chain and a lock on it. As I was scratching my head trying to figure out the lay of the land, the land owner told me I was on private property and I said how is that so. He said the fence was his and the ditch was his and the only public land was the gravel road and the state land. I could have tuned my truck perpendicular to the road and backed up to the edge of the road, droped my tailgate and jumped onto the state land over the fence. I don't know how I could have gotten out of there or what I would have done with my truck but It wasn't worth it for 1 section. Now if it would have freed up a ton of land, I would have figured something out. This is a classic example of how public land is tied up, basically our tax dollars NOT at work.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 34
    Last Post: 11-06-2013, 07:24 PM
  2. Tips on how to teach kids proper form?
    By jenbickel in forum Bowhunting
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-12-2013, 02:47 PM
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-20-2012, 09:44 PM
  4. Public access in region 7
    By clark33 in forum Montana
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 04-12-2012, 01:59 PM
  5. Access Questions
    By lineman1779 in forum Wyoming
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 12-27-2011, 06:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •