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  1. #1
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    Picked up my "Free" Rifle today...

    The Cabelas Card finally indicated enough points for a "Free" gun so I made my selection today. Savage Long Range Hunter in .300 Winny. I'm not usually a fan of being beat to death by "big calibers" (I know, call me a wuss) but I have been wanting to try the new Accubrake personally. I had thought about the Bear Hunter, but with the 23" barrel I couldn't see going .300 Win. I would probably have purchased it if Cabelas had it in .300 WSM (kind of made for a short barrel), so that left me with the Long Range Hunter... Now to mount a scope and see how it shoots. It is the only .300 I have (or have ever had). I've been a fan of a lot of "smaller" calibers my whole life, now I live in the West and I guess I will follow the crowd and see how it works out. This makes Savage number 5 in my collection... the wife asks "How many guns does a guy need?" My answer is always "I have all I NEED, just not as many as I WANT." "And besides honey, the democrats want to take them all away..." She will catch on to that one before long...

    I also found a guy locally who was selling a set of Hornady Custom Dies in .300 win, an unopened box of 208 grain Hornady AMax bullets, and unopened can of H1000, a box of Hornady Custom 180 grain SST with 5 of them shoot, a half box of Rem Core Locs 180 gr, a bunch of Hornady brass, a Hornady COAL Gauge and .300 win Modified case, for $70.... I think I am set for a while.

    Now if I could just find someone who wants to trade something fun for the Kimber 8400 Classic, in 7mmWSM, I have sitting in my safe (to pretty to actually take out and drag around the mountains) I would be all set for "Summer Time shooting and reloading Fun".
    Last edited by ChadH; 02-15-2013 at 04:27 PM.

  2. #2
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    Nice, a free gun is always a good deal. To me, a .300 is an excellent choice, for reaching out to touch something at far distances.
    -NRA Life Member
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  3. #3
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    The problem with the 7mm WSM is that unless you reload there is no bullet selection.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by enysse View Post
    The problem with the 7mm WSM is that unless you reload there is no bullet selection.
    You must mean "ammo" selection as the same "bullets" are available for the 7 wsm as are available for all 7mm's. For sure there is not as wide a factory ammo selection or the 7wsm as for a .270 or .300, but Federal, Winchester, and a few others do sell several factory loads... all available at the "Big Box" stores. Both the Federal and Winchester Accubonds shoot well. Still, you are correct, reloaders have an advantage... however, I am not one that shoots only popular calibers so I can take advantage of available "factory ammo". Lots of people in the same position, realoading is fun and educational. Eventually I'll either sell it, trade it, or decide to shoot it in the field and live with the scratches... its just to pretty to actually hunt with (to me) and to heavy of a caliber (in such a light weight configuration as the 8400) to be FUN to shoot at the range... so it is kind of in the way.

    I'm excited to shoot the .300 Muleys. I'll break in the barrel with the factory ammo I bought with the reloading dies, then try several factory loads as well as work up several hand loads, to see how she shoots. Should be fun at the very least.

  5. #5
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    im glad to hear someone else talking bout breaking in a new barrel, most of the time when i bring up breaking in a barrel to a buddy that just bought a new gun i get the deer in the head light look.

  6. #6
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    Anyone who reloads I consider a serious shooter. If you are interested enough to research reloading and try to develope the "best" load for any gun you own, you will quickly find out that every gun is different enough from it's production partner and each one will shoot one particular load better. This usually leads to learning more about guns and you will soon find out that a barrel needs to be broken in. I usually really clean a new barrel thoroughly, then take it to the range. I start with some pretty mild loads and clean the barrel after every shot for at least the first 10. Then I work into some hotter loads, making sure the barrel has really cooled down before every shot. After 20 total shots, I scrub down the barrel with a good bore cleaner (I like Sweets), scrubbing until the patch is completely clean. Thats about it for me.

    I believe the reason this is necessary is that no matter how particular and how good the barrel manufacturer is, there are rough spots and slight variations in the finish of the rifling. My first custom rifle 50 years ago had an Apex barrel on a short Sako action and was a .22-250, which was a wildcat then. Apex was one of the premier custom match barrel mfgrs. The gunsmith who did my work put a borescope in the barrel and showed me what it looked like, which looked a little rough. We actually lapped the barrel with light valve grinding compound before I shot it. Todays barrels are much better quality and the materials used are really superior. But IMHO, they still need to be broken in.
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

  7. #7
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    Well CC,

    I don't have your years of experience but I have broken in a few rifles. While I agree that shooting works out minor barrel imperfections, and barrels shoot their best after some "breaking in," I think that cleaning rituals are mostly voodoo. It seems that even the big barrel manufacturers can't come to an agreement about it. I have done the frequent cleaning break-in, but now I just clean after the first 20 rounds, and clean as needed from there. I haven't ruined a barrel yet with that method, but that's me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Colorado Cowboy View Post
    Anyone who reloads I consider a serious shooter. If you are interested enough to research reloading and try to develope the "best" load for any gun you own, you will quickly find out that every gun is different enough from it's production partner and each one will shoot one particular load better. This usually leads to learning more about guns and you will soon find out that a barrel needs to be broken in. I usually really clean a new barrel thoroughly, then take it to the range. I start with some pretty mild loads and clean the barrel after every shot for at least the first 10. Then I work into some hotter loads, making sure the barrel has really cooled down before every shot. After 20 total shots, I scrub down the barrel with a good bore cleaner (I like Sweets), scrubbing until the patch is completely clean. Thats about it for me.
    ChadH,

    I think you are going to really like that new rifle, other than the noise of the brake.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitterroot Bulls View Post
    ChadH,

    I think you are going to really like that new rifle, other than the noise of the brake.
    I think so too Matt. The reason I wanted to try the LRH was because of the Accu Brake and the option of limiting recoil at the range and the noise factor in the field. I like the idea of being able to turn the dang thing off. I am also quite curious as to whether the POI changes with the on/off function of the brake. Logic would say it would, but I've had several people I trust tell me it didn't on their guns (and a couple tell me it did, the biggest change was noted at 3" left, but all in a nice tight group). So I am really curious to see it in action. Like I said, at least in my sometimes twisted logic, it seems to me it would have to change some, but then I thought the Nikon BDC reticle for the TC Muzzleloaders was a joke and wouldn't work, until I tried one and dang if it didn't work GREAT. So that shows what I know. I the other reason I went with another Savage, along with just liking them, is that they keep coming out with, what in my mind are, "innovations". The Accu Trigger, Accu stock, Accu brake ... are all cool things usually reserved for a more custom build, but Savage introduces them for a "non-custom" rifle that the average guy can afford. I like giving my hard earned money to a company that thinks out of the box a bit. And as I KNOW that you KNOW... they just flat shoot good.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitterroot Bulls View Post
    Well CC,

    I don't have your years of experience but I have broken in a few rifles. While I agree that shooting works out minor barrel imperfections, and barrels shoot their best after some "breaking in," I think that cleaning rituals are mostly voodoo. It seems that even the big barrel manufacturers can't come to an agreement about it. I have done the frequent cleaning break-in, but now I just clean after the first 20 rounds, and clean as needed from there. I haven't ruined a barrel yet with that method, but that's me.
    I kind of have "My Own Method"... which is basically what you just said Matt. I do think it takes a bit for the "rough spots" to work out of a barrel, but have no empirical data to prove that.... I saved this article from Gale McMillan some time ago, and filled it in my "Shooting and Reloading" file. I found it interesting:



    How to Break-in a Barrel
    -- A Dissenting Point of View

    Gale McMillan, of McMillan Stocks fame, was one of the finest barrel-makers and benchrest shooters of all time. Here he argues that elaborate barrel break-in procedures do more harm than good.

    Comments collected from Gale's Gun Forum postings.

    As a barrel maker I have looked in thousands of new and used barrels with a bore scope and I will tell you that if every one followed the prescribed [one shot, one clean] break-in method, a very large number would do more harm than good. The reason you hear of the gain in accuracy is because if you chamber a barrel with a reamer that has a dull throater instead of cutting clean sharp rifling it smears a burr up on the down wind side of the rifling. It takes from one to two hundred rounds to burn this burr out and the rifle to settle down and shoot its best. Any one who chambers rifle barrels has tolerances on how dull to let the reamer get and factories let them go longer than any competent smith would.

    Another tidbit to consider--take a 300 Win Mag that has a life expectancy of 1000 rounds. Use 10% of it up with your break-in procedure. For every 10 barrels the barrel-maker makes he has to make one more just to take care of the break-in. No wonder barrel-makers like to see this. Now when you flame me on this please [explain] what you think is happening to the inside of your barrel during the break in that is helping you.

    Consider this: every round shot in breaking-in a barrel is one round off the life of said rifle barrel. No one has ever told me the physical reason of what happens during break-in firing. In other words what, to the number of pounds of powder shot at any given pressure, is the life of the barrel. No one has ever explained what is being accomplished by shooting and cleaning in any prescribed method. Start your barrel off with 5 rounds and clean it thoroughly and do it again. Nev Maden, a friend down under that my brother taught to make barrels was the one who came up with the [one shot one clean] break-in method. He may think he has come upon something, or he has come up with another way to sell barrels. I feel that the first shot out of a barrel is its best and every one after that deteriorates [the bore] until the barrel is gone. If some one can explain what physically takes place during break-in to modify the barrel then I may change my mind. As the physical properties of a barrel don't change because of the break-in procedures it means it's all hog wash. I am open to any suggestions that can be documented otherwise if it is just someone's opinion--forget it.

    It all got started when a barrel maker that I know started putting break-in instructions in the box with each barrel he shipped a few years ago. I asked him how he figured it would help and his reply was if they shoot 100 rounds breaking in this barrel that's total life is 3000 rounds and I make 1000 barrels a year just figure how many more barrels I will get to make. He had a point; it definately will shorten the barrel life. I have been a barrel maker a fair amount of time and my barrels have set and reset benchrest world records so many times I quit keeping track (at one time they held 7 at one time) along with High Power, Silhouette, Smallbore national and world records and my instructions were to clean as often as possible preferably every 10 rounds. I inspect every barrel taken off and every new barrel before it is shipped with a bore scope and I will tell you all that I see far more barrels ruined by cleaning rods than I see worn out from normal wear and tear. I am even reading about people recommending breaking-in pistols. As if it will help their shooting ability or the guns'.

  10. #10
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    ChadH, you are correct I meant ammo in factory loads.
    About 15 years ago the 7mm STW was popular, today you never hear about it. 7 WSM is really an efficient caliber.

 

 

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