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    Bear Summer Sausage?

    Shot a little bear last year, got it tested and ended up not using any of it. Doing some research and found alot of people make it into summer sausage? Any idea's on that. getting pretty excited for this years spring bear, gonna try and do something with my bear this year. Any recipes or past experiences?

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    by tested, do you mean its was positive for trichinosis?

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    Quote Originally Posted by buckbull View Post
    by tested, do you mean its was positive for trichinosis?
    Yea, sorry should have included that.

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    I know the old adage was to cook pork to at least 160 degrees to kill trichinosis. Trichinosis has been pretty much wiped out of the domestic pigs here in the states. Bears on the otherhand have pretty high infection rates. If the sausage was smoked hot enough to kill the trichinosis it would be fine to eat I would think.

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    Quote Originally Posted by montanahunter10 View Post
    Yea, sorry should have included that.
    Where do you take meat to get tested?
    -NRA Life Member
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    i was unfamiliar with this.

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    I make summer sausge, jerky and brekfast sausage. As long as you get it to the right temps and make sure it is well cooked there is no problem.

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    Here's a great clip of Steve Rinella talking to the author of Charchutrie about parasites in bear meat:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2ulsLOPgNQ

    Trichinella spiralis is member of the roundworm family. You get infected by eating meat from another infected animal's meat, so only carnivores or omnivores can get it. The worm is released from the meat by the digestive enzymes in your stomach and the adult worms then burrow into the epithelial lining of your small intestine where they mate and produce new larvae. The larvae then burrow through your tissue into your blood and lymph vessels where they spread throughout your body and deposit into your skeletal muscle where they encased themselves and persist for years. Sometimes the larvae get lost and deposit into your heart muscle or brain which will kill you. When another animal eats that meat, the life cycle is completed. Yeah, crazy gross!

    The reason it used to be so prevalent in pork meat was because they used to feed pigs pork scraps, thus reinfecting other pigs. The banning of feeding pigs uncooked meat scraps has essentially eliminated this phenomena in pork, but that is why they always tell you to cook pork well done all the time.

    The state will usually test a sample for you. When I shot a bear in Montana, they offered to take a sample from the tongue to test. But even though the state will exempt you from wanton waste laws if it is positive, you can still eat its meat as long as you cook it well done. A combination of freezing your bear meat and cooking it well done every time would be a pretty good combo to make sure you won't get sick. I subscribe pretty heavily to the idea that you should do all you can not waste anything you have killed and would honestly still eat an infected bear.
    Can't spell scum without U&M... Go 'Cats!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSUcat61 View Post
    Here's a great clip of Steve Rinella talking to the author of Charchutrie about parasites in bear meat:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2ulsLOPgNQ

    Trichinella spiralis is member of the roundworm family. You get infected by eating meat from another infected animal's meat, so only carnivores or omnivores can get it. The worm is released from the meat by the digestive enzymes in your stomach and the adult worms then burrow into the epithelial lining of your small intestine where they mate and produce new larvae. The larvae then burrow through your tissue into your blood and lymph vessels where they spread throughout your body and deposit into your skeletal muscle where they encased themselves and persist for years. Sometimes the larvae get lost and deposit into your heart muscle or brain which will kill you. When another animal eats that meat, the life cycle is completed. Yeah, crazy gross!

    The reason it used to be so prevalent in pork meat was because they used to feed pigs pork scraps, thus reinfecting other pigs. The banning of feeding pigs uncooked meat scraps has essentially eliminated this phenomena in pork, but that is why they always tell you to cook pork well done all the time.

    The state will usually test a sample for you. When I shot a bear in Montana, they offered to take a sample from the tongue to test. But even though the state will exempt you from wanton waste laws if it is positive, you can still eat its meat as long as you cook it well done. A combination of freezing your bear meat and cooking it well done every time would be a pretty good combo to make sure you won't get sick. I subscribe pretty heavily to the idea that you should do all you can not waste anything you have killed and would honestly still eat an infected bear.
    Wow. Lol i watched that clip as well before i made this post. Just wanted to get some more opinions on it. I cant remember where i got it tested at, i had my dad do it for me lol. All i knew was that my dad didnt want to go through the trouble and i didnt know anything about it back then. I might try and make summersausage this year, have a pretty good dehydrater i can use.

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    I made some salami out of my spring bear turned out great.

 

 

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