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  1. #31
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    I definetely fit into the "want to do more than I can afford". I am in a great spot with a senior and a junior in high school. My hunting passion is quickly getting revived.

    I am the solitary hunter, but love to hunt with my Brother and my Niece. I am a horrible shooter but i can sure find em. We have decided that my niece will run on my hip and finish the job. I am pretty good with that. I get just as much thrill just being part of it.

    I am not a huge fan of horses, but getting passed up by a four wheeler or simply listening to one in the distance really gets me depressed.

    I have found that most of the people I do run into in the backcountry are people like me, and we all have a mutual respect for one another. Whether we hike for miles from a base tent or a spike out, we are all putting out a huge effort for our passion. My brother and I spent an hour talking with a couple guys from Cali last year on top of Steens Mtn the day before the season opened. Good times!! You guys may be on the forum??

  2. #32
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    This is where I hunt. No trails, ATV's, or horses will get you there. Just boots. I never see another hunter. However, it will kill you getting the elk meat out alone. I hunt nothing but timber. 75 yds would be a long shot. I've never hunted any other way, and I never wanted to. Just me and the mountain.

    Last edited by Old Hunter; 04-10-2013 at 07:27 PM.

  3. #33
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    OH, I don't mean to toot my own horn but that is pretty country but it doesn't look like tough country. I think that if you lead a horse you can get them a lot of places. If you actually get off your horse and lead them they have a much easier time negotiating tough country. I have off loaded quarters just to get my horses thru some nasty stuff and them loaded them back on. I don't hunt in the collegiate peaks but maybe I will see you up there someday. My mule and I have talked and we want to ride up every canyon in colorado

  4. #34
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    Hunting the dark timber is something I need to try. I think it could be the answer to some of the overcrowding problems I have been having but it's a different hunt than I am used to. After the pressure is on the elk seem to go there and not come out.What does everyone do to find them in the timber do you move slow and get wind right or just set up along a trail?

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKC View Post
    OH, I don't mean to toot my own horn but that is pretty country but it doesn't look like tough country. I think that if you lead a horse you can get them a lot of places. If you actually get off your horse and lead them they have a much easier time negotiating tough country. I have off loaded quarters just to get my horses thru some nasty stuff and them loaded them back on. I don't hunt in the collegiate peaks but maybe I will see you up there someday. My mule and I have talked and we want to ride up every canyon in colorado
    It's tough when you have to walk up there. I'm right at timberline, and my Jeep is 3-4 miles away down the mountain. There's no trail at all, so you're fighting the timber all the way. Then again, i'm 70, so maybe it wouldn't seem so hard when I was younger. Seems so long ago I can't remember.

    This is on the way up. It sort of opened up here, and I stopped for a snack. I do that a lot.




    Some old miners cabin from the past.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by nebugle View Post
    Hunting the dark timber is something I need to try. I think it could be the answer to some of the overcrowding problems I have been having but it's a different hunt than I am used to. After the pressure is on the elk seem to go there and not come out.What does everyone do to find them in the timber do you move slow and get wind right or just set up along a trail?
    Exactly. You want to still hunt the timber. You're hunting elk that are bedded down, or moving back and forth to the bedding areas. Sometimes they just get up to stretch, and move around a bit. The best part is you can hunt like this all day. This is where they are during the day. In early and late hours they are moving from and to this area. I'm not one to sit in one spot glassing. I like to keep moving very slow. See them, before they see you. Be sneaky.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hunter View Post
    Exactly. You want to still hunt the timber. You're hunting elk that are bedded down, or moving back and forth to the bedding areas. Sometimes they just get up to stretch, and move around a bit. The best part is you can hunt like this all day. This is where they are during the day. In early and late hours they are moving from and to this area. I'm not one to sit in one spot glassing. I like to keep moving very slow. See them, before they see you. Be sneaky.
    Thats really the only way I really know how to hunt. My Dad & Granddad taught me that was the way. Learned to hunt deer in the Sierras in Cal that way and hunt elk the same way here. Works pretty well too!!
    Colorado Cowboy
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  8. #38
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    Same here. My dad taught me to still hunt, and I never changed. I don't know how guys can stay in a stand all day. It would be torture for me.

  9. #39
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    I thought the same way about stand hunting at one point in my life. I've mostly been a Midwest Whitetail hunter, and I came to realize for what I was doing, sitting still was my best shot at success. I can sit in a tree for hours. At some point, I took my watch and stuck it into a pocket where I couldn't easily reach it -- started just paying attention to the woods, it became like what I would imagine people who meditate experience (I know I probably sound like a loon here), and time just seems to slip by with me hardly noticing it. I also see more deer than I ever did. That said, I still like moving around bit too.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hunter View Post
    Same here. My dad taught me to still hunt, and I never changed. I don't know how guys can stay in a stand all day. It would be torture for me.
    You are right about that. I remember the first time someone told me I still hunted....I looked at him and said "Huh". I walk all day and don't sit in a blind, what the hell do you mean still!!!

    When I went to Texas for the first time to hunt hogs, I sat in a high stand on poles and watched a feeder in a food plot. Saw lots of deer and finally shot a pig after a couple of hours. I just about went nuts sitting there. I don't know how they do it, sitting in those tree stands all day!!!
    Last edited by Colorado Cowboy; 04-11-2013 at 07:29 AM.
    Colorado Cowboy
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    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
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