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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Multi-SpeciesHunter View Post
    Well I'm getting to that age where I have to start making some decisions..so I need to choose a career. This is very hard for me since it needs to be able to afford my hunting habits and obviously have time for them. Some say I'm crazy for making this a priority. But it is, and always will be. So what do you diehards do for a living? I have been looking at being a lineman and working on power lines, but am not sure. I don't go on luxurious hunts and do mainly DIY and try to spend the least amount as possible. So I don't need to be a doctor or anything. So guys, what do you do?
    One thing I would recommend is to be very conscious of how much, if any, student debt that you will take on. I think people in America are finally realizing that going to a private/prestigious school isn't worth it all the time if you rack up a ton of debt. Community and public schools will be just fine for the majority of professions.

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  3. #62
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    If a guy has done well in math and science in school, or has the aptitude for it, I always encourage them to look into engineering then working for a PRIVATE company as one of the best opportunities for career and income growth. It usually only takes a four year degree (B.S.), so you won't have the years of post graduate work like a doctor does. There is a high rate of employment, good starting salaries, and if you are with a good company opportunities to move into management.
    Grand Slam #1005 + 2: Dall (1986 Yukon), Fannin/Stone (1987 Yukon), Bighorn (1988 Colorado Unit S-26), Stone (1995 British Columbia), Desert (2001 Nevada Unit 161), Bighorn (2009 Wyoming Unit 5)

  4. #63
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    Another BIG piece of advice, the money you save towards retirement in your first 15 years working (20-35 years old) if invested well will go much much further than all the money saved in your next 30 years of working (35-65 years old). That is due to compounded interest. It's better to sacrifice a bit on the front end and enjoy the rewards on the back end.
    Grand Slam #1005 + 2: Dall (1986 Yukon), Fannin/Stone (1987 Yukon), Bighorn (1988 Colorado Unit S-26), Stone (1995 British Columbia), Desert (2001 Nevada Unit 161), Bighorn (2009 Wyoming Unit 5)

  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Umpqua Hunter View Post
    If a guy has done well in math and science in school, or has the aptitude for it, I always encourage them to look into engineering then working for a PRIVATE company as one of the best opportunities for career and income growth. It usually only takes a four year degree (B.S.), so you won't have the years of post graduate work like a doctor does. There is a high rate of employment, good starting salaries, and if you are with a good company opportunities to move into management.
    You are spot on! I have a BS degree in Production Eng and an MBA (which my company paid for). I worked 40 years for 2 private aerospace companies. If you want to work hard and keep going to school while you are working, anything is possible. When I retired 13 years ago I was making around 150K a year. got great benefits and a good retirement.....and it was interesting, fun work. The only downside is I spent a lot of time a different test centers (Edwards, White Sands, Area 51, etc) living in a motel for months at a time. On call a lot and of course the further up in mgmt you get, the more hours you spend working.
    Colorado Cowboy
    Cowboy Action Shooter; Endowment Life Member-NRA
    The Original Rocket Scientist-Retired
    "My Father always considered a walk in the mountains as the equivalent of church going."
    Aldous Huxley

  6. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Umpqua Hunter View Post
    Another BIG piece of advice, the money you save towards retirement in your first 15 years working (20-35 years old) if invested well will go much much further than all the money saved in your next 30 years of working (35-65 years old). That is due to compounded interest. It's better to sacrifice a bit on the front end and enjoy the rewards on the back end.
    Well said. I just read something real similar today, as it continues, that many folks today do not heed this advice! Therefore, we give "handouts".

    Sorry, I'm off topic, ,,,

  7. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Multi-SpeciesHunter View Post
    Well I'm getting to that age where I have to start making some decisions..so I need to choose a career. This is very hard for me since it needs to be able to afford my hunting habits and obviously have time for them. Some say I'm crazy for making this a priority. But it is, and always will be. So what do you diehards do for a living? I have been looking at being a lineman and working on power lines, but am not sure. I don't go on luxurious hunts and do mainly DIY and try to spend the least amount as possible. So I don't need to be a doctor or anything. So guys, what do you do?
    Electronics tech for the Navy, working on my electrical engineering degree, and in the Air Force Reserves.

    As far as anybody saying you're crazy for making hunting a priority in your life, what do they think that your priority should be?

    Colorado Cowboy, I'm right up the road from where you used to work, I deal with your former companies on a regular basis.
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

  8. #67
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    I'm a Stewardship Forester with the Oregon Department of Forestry. Forestry has been good to me over the last 24 years and I've seen and found a lot of neat things over the years. Being very involved in wildland fire managment has made it tough to archery hunt during the month of September. That is the only negative.

  9. #68
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    Vice President - Investments. I have a MBA and a B.S in Enginnering Technology. Was a business development executive prior to entering the financial world in 2007. Some good advice above, getting a technical or engineering degree is a great path forward. I actually got an A.S in Instrumentation Technology before moving on to getting my B.S., then M.B.A. My previous company paid for most of my B.S. and for half of my M.B.A. Get your credentials and work hard, harder than the next guy, bring it everyday and you will do well. The B.S. or B.A. will open the door, hard work and being smart while working hard will take you up the ladder. Working harder than most also works well for me while hunting too !!! Good luck.

    WillPower

  10. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKC View Post
    Eye, You will love Colorado. We have everything to offer the outdoorsman.
    Like your new gun laws?
    Arise... Kill, Eat! - Acts 10:13

  11. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elkoholic307 View Post
    Like your new gun laws?
    Elkoholic, I hate our new laws! Checkout this video and pay particular attention to what she says at the end of the video. This women is a complete idiot. Not only is she screwing up Colorado, she is helping draft federal language for the gun laws and was praised Obama for her work.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mxtu228bYFw

 

 

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