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  1. #1
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    how far to glass?

    So just wandering how far do you all glass for game. I know that if an animal is out in the open with 10x binos you might be able to see them at 3 miles ish is my guess. I personaly try not to go to places that i can see more then two just so i spend more time on the places nearer to me and have found game that far. But its also if you can see them in the brush when there partly hidden ....so thats my question

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    In the mornings ill glass as far as my spotter will let me. In the evenings I rely on the binos. Typically if I can find em in the evening with a couple hours of light I can close the distance before dark. But with the spotter it will really mislead you on how far the game is. Im good at judging up to 300 yards or so with my eyeballs as a rangefinder. But behind the spotter 2 miles can quickly turn to four/five and I end up racing the sun.
    http://www.solooutdoor.com/ Contact me for used optic specials!

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    This is a very generic question. It has many factors that have to be considered. I have glassed 2-3 miles away and I have glassed 200 yards away. It all depends on the terrain and size of the area. I use a combo of spotter as well as 10x binos on and off the tripod. Too many guys try and glass miles away without thoroughly glassing the closer areas. However you glass make sure you pick an area completely apart. Any experienced hunter knows how it feels to blow an animals out of an area because they didn't thoroughly glass thay area. Patience is key.

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    ya i did forget to put in about what you use to glass ....so how about a a spotter and binoculars in the 8-12x range ...i like 12x myself i dont find many people use 12 power heaver but things look closer

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    8-12x is a pretty broad range. 8 power Is going to seem a lot less shaky than 12x. 12x binos on a tripod are a very useful tool. Same with 15x. It all depends what you need for the country you hunt in. Lots of variables to consider. Are you packing in? Do you bring a tripod? Do you have plan on using a tripod. With 8x binos and nothing else distance glassing is going to be tough. I have hunted country where 8x binos was all I needed though. As I said before lots of variables.

  6. #6
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    Fun question.. My very first rule of thumb is to get as high as i can. From there, I try my hardest to set up with a 500 yd immediate shooting area. Then I'll choose my focus area. Typically within a mile. Then everything else I will only glass for "fun", giving my eyes a break or my mind a rest.

    In my experience, most successful times for glassing is the morning and evening. During that time , the sun/light changes so many things so often having too large of an area can hurt you.

    Fun post... over the years glassing has become my favorite part of the hunt.

  7. #7
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    I also enjoy glassing. It is very relaxing to me and is a huge part of the hunt. I start with my binos first and pick apart everything from where I'm sitting out to a mile or so. Then I use the spotter out to as far as I can clearly see. Then I work backwards going from the farthest with the spotter back to the binos and back to where I'm sitting. It may take me an hr to do this once depending on how much country I can see. Then I repeat, picking out points of interest to concentrate on. A deep canyon, a group of trees, spring and so on. I will consistently re look at the same area over and over again. With each time I look at it I will slow down and look at the base of every tree, bush, bolder so by the time I'm done glassing I know I haven't missed anything that would be out in the open or even bedded in the shadows. Again this can take hrs but when I'm done glassing that area and I move to a new spot I want to be as sure as I can that I won't spook a big buck or bull cause I didn't see him.
    I don't Break the rules, I Modify them.

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    Just to be different. I find no need to glass, so I don't do it. Something else I don't need to carry, and look at the money I save by not buying binos and scopes.

    Don't hate me.

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    I'm kinda like Old Hunter. I've never owned a spottng scope. I use bino's when scouting, but don't always carry them when hunting. I did use glass when I went sheep hunting though. I borrowed a Spotting scope from a friend, but I used my 10x bino's for spotting. I used the scope to verify. Ihad a tough time trying to use the spotting scope for glassing. I would glass one canoyn for 5-6 hrs then move on, It was hard to sit that long, but I knew there were sheep there, they just had to be in the right spot to see them. The funny thing is, the ram I shot, I spotted with my naked eye at over a mile away.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old Hunter View Post
    Just to be different. I find no need to glass, so I don't do it. Something else I don't need to carry, and look at the money I save by not buying binos and scopes.

    Don't hate me.
    I don't hate ya at all. I just wish more hunters didn't glass

    I am a serious glasser, my earliest hunts were with guys who would sit on a high point and glass for hours, and I fell in love with it. For me it's a huge part of the hunt and can spend all day glassing and have a lot of fun doing it.

    Funny thing is when I look at the last four years of hunting. Last year 2012, my wife and I took 6 animals (4 antelope, 1 sheep, 1 mule deer) and all were spotted with our naked eyes. In 2011 I took two mule deer and a 6 point Roosevelt bull, and all three were spotted with my naked eyes. In 2010 we took a mule deer and two antelope, only one antelope was spotted by glassing. In 2009 I took a sheep and a big blacktail buck, and the sheep was located by glassing.

    So out of our last 14 animals only 2 were located by glassing....hmmmm a lot less than I expected. I guess one was to look at it is we are about 17% more successful by glassing.
    Last edited by Umpqua Hunter; 05-06-2013 at 03:13 PM.
    Grand Slam #1005 + 2: Dall (1986 Yukon), Fannin/Stone (1987 Yukon), Bighorn (1988 Colorado Unit S-26), Stone (1995 British Columbia), Desert (2001 Nevada Unit 161), Bighorn (2009 Wyoming Unit 5)

 

 

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