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  1. #11
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    I agree with Eric Bailey about the calorie burn and appetite lose. Just the high altitude ups your calorie burn. They say it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it. If your out that long your appetite may catch up, but otherwise I think the only way you could keep up would be to take a day off during the week, and who's going to do that? I try to minimize weight lose but it always happens. Getting your weight up before you go can help.

    I look at calories per ounce when choosing what to take. I have found energy bars to be a waste, except maybe for the Snickers Marathon bar. Most have a lot of sugar and I can't get ten feet on one. For breakfast I have Old Fashioned Oatmeal with Nido freeze dried whole milk, Spiru-tein protein powder, and raisins. Sometimes I add peanuts. Just add it with boiling water to a insulated bottle and let it cook. Nature's Path Pumpkin Flax Granola can be substituted for for the oatmeal for a faster breakfast, but cold. I plan to add flax seed meal to the mix this year (something I read). Oberto's pork jerky, peanut M&M's, cashews, dried tomatoes, walnuts, and peanuts are good snacks. Mountain House is good. The Sweet & Sour and Chili Mac with Beef are my favorite, two serving size only. Get the propak type or it gets bulky fast. Mission Wraps (Walmart) are good, high calorie, hold up well, and can be used with the MH chili mac to make a burrito. I also carry Bear Creek freeze dried soup (Walmart). Tortilla and Hot & Sour are my favorite. I add twice the recommended amount to boiling water in the insulated bottle to up the calories. Tyson's sausage crumbles are good if the OAT cooperates and are high calorie. Add to the Mountain House or the soup. High fat is good. Foil packaged tuna IN OIL and salmon are good for lunch and when taking a break. I also take Alpine Apple Cider mix. Great before getting into the tent for the night and helps you get more water down. Hard boiled eggs are good for the first few days, but I don't do that much. A frozen steak would be good the first day too, but you would have to build a fire, and I never do that.

    A hiking buddy goes all week on peanuts, raisins, and jerky. Thats all he eats all week, every snack, every meal. For me variety is important, otherwise consumption goes down.

  2. #12
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    Check out wilderness athlete products a little pricey but good drink mixes to help that energy need , I'm in my late fifties and I'll start using some of their products a week before the hunt starts ,they make a noticeable difference for me.

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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elk Hunter View Post
    I agree with Eric Bailey about the calorie burn and appetite lose. Just the high altitude ups your calorie burn. They say it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it. If your out that long your appetite may catch up, but otherwise I think the only way you could keep up would be to take a day off during the week, and who's going to do that? I try to minimize weight lose but it always happens. Getting your weight up before you go can help.

    I look at calories per ounce when choosing what to take. I have found energy bars to be a waste, except maybe for the Snickers Marathon bar. Most have a lot of sugar and I can't get ten feet on one. For breakfast I have Old Fashioned Oatmeal with Nido freeze dried whole milk, Spiru-tein protein powder, and raisins. Sometimes I add peanuts. Just add it with boiling water to a insulated bottle and let it cook. Nature's Path Pumpkin Flax Granola can be substituted for for the oatmeal for a faster breakfast, but cold. I plan to add flax seed meal to the mix this year (something I read). Oberto's pork jerky, peanut M&M's, cashews, dried tomatoes, walnuts, and peanuts are good snacks. Mountain House is good. The Sweet & Sour and Chili Mac with Beef are my favorite, two serving size only. Get the propak type or it gets bulky fast. Mission Wraps (Walmart) are good, high calorie, hold up well, and can be used with the MH chili mac to make a burrito. I also carry Bear Creek freeze dried soup (Walmart). Tortilla and Hot & Sour are my favorite. I add twice the recommended amount to boiling water in the insulated bottle to up the calories. Tyson's sausage crumbles are good if the OAT cooperates and are high calorie. Add to the Mountain House or the soup. High fat is good. Foil packaged tuna IN OIL and salmon are good for lunch and when taking a break. I also take Alpine Apple Cider mix. Great before getting into the tent for the night and helps you get more water down. Hard boiled eggs are good for the first few days, but I don't do that much. A frozen steak would be good the first day too, but you would have to build a fire, and I never do that.

    A hiking buddy goes all week on peanuts, raisins, and jerky. Thats all he eats all week, every snack, every meal. For me variety is important, otherwise consumption goes down.
    These are great suggestions. Going to have to try some of them this year to get a little more variety.

  5. #14
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    I'm not sure how they compare in terms of calories per ounce to what you normally carry, but I eat a bear valley pemmican bar most days for lunch along with some trail mix. They have 420 calories in 3.75 ounces (112/oz) . While they do have a fair amount of sugar they have more complex carbs than the average energy bar (about half of total carbs) along with 17 grams of protein. They don't taste great, but nothing tastes "good" to me in the middle of the day when I'm backpacking.

    I too eat granola for breakfast. I eat the mountain house Granola With Milk and Blueberries. It is the meal that is easiest for me to get down every day. It has 520 calories and less than 1/3 of the carbs are from sugar. I only bring a spork and my jetboil stove with me so I like that I can just eat it out of the bag. I think I'll try bringing some protein powder this year and mix it in. Good idea.

  6. #15
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    Be aware that the first two to three days, you're appetite will be almost gone due to the elevation changes. While your body is aclimating, the urge to eat is diminished greatly by the fact that you may not feel nauseous but the effects of elevation will make your stomach sensitive and at best you might squeeze down a few snacks and a mountain house meal... Just be sure to hydrate to help with the headaches and suppliment additives to your water with something like Wilderness Athlete "Hydrate and Recover" with glucosamine to reduce muscle and joint fatigue.
    "This is A Way of Life"

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  8. #16
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    I typically lose my appetite for three days or more depending how active I get and or how high in altitude I get or how hard I push myself. Fortunately I don't get much of an altitude sickness, sensitive stomach other than some slight headaches. Some of my friends get out right sick unless they acclimate slowly. I have to almost force and remind myself to eat and drink. Last week I went from 400 ft elevation where I live and drove a few hours up to 7,200 ft where I started my backpack hike in several miles up to a gain of 9,000 + ft. and then setting up camp. Keeping hydrated and some calories not only helps with my energy level, mind and muscles from fatigue but helps with me keeping warm when it's cold out or cool when it's warm out. I used to like to push myself on less when I was younger because I thought I could get away will less, perhaps I could but I think it's just wiser and safer to keep gas in the truck so to speak instead of trying to get around the mountains on an empty tank whenever possible.

  9. #17
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    I didn't read all above posts, but size of the person is VERY important. I'm about 6'2 190lb. I need a lot more than my 5'7 160lb hunting partner. But I also dont need as much as a guy who is 6'4 250lb. And I might want 3500 while sheep hunting, but only 2500 while mule deer hunting rolling hills. I'm sure my post isn't as detailed as above posts, but hopefully my 2 cents helped someone.

  10. #18
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    Your pemmican bar and granola sound like good ideas Eric. I will look those up. Know what you mean about things not tasting good. I've had things that taste great at home just refuse to go down by the third day. Cliff bars are the worst for some reason.

    Headaches, I believe, are a early sign of dehydration. I start drinking water, whether I need it or not, on the way out. A camelback type system is essential I think to maintaining hydration on the trail. I at least will tend not to go to the trouble of dragging out a water bottle as often as I should on the trail. With a camelback I drink water every time I think about it, especially the first three days.

    I know what Kevin Root is saying about maintaining body temperature. I have read that dehydration will cause the body to lose its ability to regulate temperature, just not sure its the same thing. Maybe just not getting enough calories for the activity level. You do have to feed the engine if you want it to work. The body will get what it needs, even if its muscle mass, which is why I try to minimize weight loss.

  11. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Multi-SpeciesHunter View Post
    I didn't read all above posts, but size of the person is VERY important. I'm about 6'2 190lb. I need a lot more than my 5'7 160lb hunting partner. But I also dont need as much as a guy who is 6'4 250lb. And I might want 3500 while sheep hunting, but only 2500 while mule deer hunting rolling hills. I'm sure my post isn't as detailed as above posts, but hopefully my 2 cents helped someone.
    That is a good point Multi-SpeciesHunter. I am 5'11" and around 180lbs. Not sure how to determine calorie needs, but for me its not based on how hungry I am. I have a worksheet that will calculate the calories per day that I am carrying, but many times I think I am probably doing only 1300 to 1400 calories per day on a 7 day 70 mile section of the CDT. Never hungry, eat all I can, and weight is down to around 165lbs by the time I get off the trail. One of the other hikers, who is bigger than me, carries about twice what I carry, eats almost all of it, and doesn't lose nearly as much weight as I do. I've tried but I couldn't begin to eat that much. He also lives in Colorado Springs while I'm in Missouri. To many variables to say definitely cause and affect, but when I found doing research that it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it, it got my attention.

  12. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graylight View Post
    Be aware that the first two to three days, you're appetite will be almost gone due to the elevation changes. While your body is aclimating, the urge to eat is diminished greatly by the fact that you may not feel nauseous but the effects of elevation will make your stomach sensitive and at best you might squeeze down a few snacks and a mountain house meal... Just be sure to hydrate to help with the headaches and suppliment additives to your water with something like Wilderness Athlete "Hydrate and Recover" with glucosamine to reduce muscle and joint fatigue.
    I need to try something like this for this year.

    Last fall was my first time hunting at high elevation, I was aware of the really important altitude sickness symptoms (the ones that would put you in the hospital), but I guess I didn't get well enough versed on the more subtle effects of altitude adjustment.

    I didn't get headaches or nausea, I just slept like crap (sleeping pad contributed to that plus a sore back), I just wasn't all that hungry and by the third day, my body just hurt. I did drink plenty of water, maybe not quite as much as I should have, but I made sure to drink regularly.

    Letting the cold creep up on me like I did (stupid mistake on my part) didn't help matters either, but at least I recognized the symptoms of that, which contributed to my decision to leave early.
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

 

 

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