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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elk Hunter View Post
    That is a good point Multi-SpeciesHunter. I am 5'11" and around 180lbs. Not sure how to determine calorie needs, but for me its not based on how hungry I am. I have a worksheet that will calculate the calories per day that I am carrying, but many times I think I am probably doing only 1300 to 1400 calories per day on a 7 day 70 mile section of the CDT. Never hungry, eat all I can, and weight is down to around 165lbs by the time I get off the trail. One of the other hikers, who is bigger than me, carries about twice what I carry, eats almost all of it, and doesn't lose nearly as much weight as I do. I've tried but I couldn't begin to eat that much. He also lives in Colorado Springs while I'm in Missouri. To many variables to say definitely cause and affect, but when I found doing research that it takes two weeks for your body to adjust to what your doing to it, it got my attention.
    The Live Strong website tells you figure out your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories your body requires just to stay alive. They then have other charts that help you get an idea of how many additional calories your body will burn based on the type and level of activity that you're doing.

    I do know that military mountain and artic warfare rations are designed to supply 3000 - 4000 calories per day.

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/25...y-expenditure/
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

  2. #22
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    This has turned into a great thread!! I have gotten a lot of great ideas and some great suggestions. Tough to change older ways but I will definitely make some changes. I am really trying to lighten the load yet get keep the nutritional value. I can all ready see a few pounds coming off the pack. Keep them coming. Thanks to all for the suggestions.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacDonald View Post
    Mark, take a look at the energy replacement drinks that are sold at cycling and running shops. Mixing them in your water will not only supplement your calorie burn, but help to maintain your electrolyte balance and allow your body to recover quicker from heavy exercise. I'm taking in freeze-dried stuff for morning and evening, and adding cheese, Costco crumbled bacon, nuts and fruit for modified trail mix, and I'm snacking frequently during the day. Since I'm an "old guy", I also take in plenty of Tylenol and some cognac in a small Platypus bladder. It's nice to have a little thimble-full of something while I'm hovering over my spotting scope in the evenings!

    A guy who was camping at the site I was at last fall had some Patron Anejo... I'd only had Jose Quervo before then, yack... That Patron is some good stuff.

    I didn't take anything up with me, but a little bit of that went a long way to take the edge off. I will be including that this year.

    For those of you that have used the Wilderness Athlete, is it a big enough improvement over Gatorade to justify the additional cost?

    I did see that they have meal replacement shakes, but they only come in a bucket, so not very useful for taking along. I could make multiple single-serving bags, but I've typically found that they don't hold up well after a couple of days - moisture gets in, they spill, etc.

    Thoughts?
    Last edited by JMSZ; 06-06-2013 at 12:04 PM.
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMSZ View Post
    The Live Strong website tells you figure out your Basal Metabolic Rate, which is the number of calories your body requires just to stay alive. They then have other charts that help you get an idea of how many additional calories your body will burn based on the type and level of activity that you're doing.

    I do know that military mountain and artic warfare rations are designed to supply 3000 - 4000 calories per day.

    http://www.livestrong.com/article/25...y-expenditure/
    Thank you for the link JMSZ. Looks like I need about 3000 calories/day, with approximately half carbohydrates and the remainder split between protein and fat. I'm going to try it this year.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMSZ View Post
    I've typically found that they don't hold up well after a couple of days - moisture gets in, they spill, etc.

    Thoughts?
    I use ziplock bags and I take a few extra just in case. No problems but then everything is in a bear canister. I keep the bear canister full with anything not needed on the trail as needed to minimize shifting.
    Last edited by Elk Hunter; 06-06-2013 at 12:14 PM.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elk Hunter View Post
    I use ziplock bags and I take a few extra just in case. No problems but then everything is in a bear canister. I keep the bear canister full with anything not needed on the trail as needed to minimize shifting.
    That reminds me, I was going to ask - Where do you keep the stuff that you eat on the trail during the day?

    My question pertains to bears, etc. Does everything that comes in contact with food (including your clothes) go in your bear bag/canister or do you just stuff your snacks in the pocket of your coat and hope a bear doesn't come into your tent looking for your goodies?

    I picked up some OpSacks, same company that makes the aLockSacks (sp?), I'll use those along with a bear bag as insurance.
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 25contender View Post
    This has turned into a great thread!! I have gotten a lot of great ideas and some great suggestions. Tough to change older ways but I will definitely make some changes. I am really trying to lighten the load yet get keep the nutritional value. I can all ready see a few pounds coming off the pack. Keep them coming. Thanks to all for the suggestions.
    In case you're considering instant noodles and looking for options besides Top Ramen, here's the kind that I take, it's the Korean spicy kind.

    http://www.amazon.com/Nongshim-Shin-...ds=shin+ramyun
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMSZ View Post
    For those of you that have used the Wilderness Athlete, is it a big enough improvement over Gatorade to justify the additional cost?
    The biggest factor here will simply be the glucosamine for joint and muscle recovery. The sweeteners they use are all natural and taste good, without the dye that Gatorade uses. WA also replaces the salts and electrolytes I need with the glucosamine which is what makes it a great chioce. Gatorade alone, will not meet all of your bodies needs.

    I have no use for their protein pak's - They are not what I want to choke down on a backpack hunt. Kippered herring snacks in the pulltab can are good energy foods, however that is separate from what the WA drink mix does.

    A lot of people like the other powdered/drop drink mixes like Mio and crystal light, however those do nothing more than add flavor. You need to replace nutrients, not watch calories when it comes to hydration.

    After the third to fourth day, the sleep will get MUCH better. It takes time for your red blood cell count to raise enough to handle the decreased oxygen absorption rates. After a week, you should be completely out of the woods and feeling pretty good, however, that just so happens to coincide at a time when your body is about done from the vertical hikes every day covering ground.... THAT is where the WA drink mix will save your butt.
    "This is A Way of Life"

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMSZ View Post
    That reminds me, I was going to ask - Where do you keep the stuff that you eat on the trail during the day?

    My question pertains to bears, etc. Does everything that comes in contact with food (including your clothes) go in your bear bag/canister or do you just stuff your snacks in the pocket of your coat and hope a bear doesn't come into your tent looking for your goodies?

    I picked up some OpSacks, same company that makes the aLockSacks (sp?), I'll use those along with a bear bag as insurance.
    Good question. It would seem to defeat the purpose of using a bear canister if your carrying your snacks in your side pocket all day. Trash, toothpaste, snacks and all go in the bear canister, but not my clothing or my backpack. Hopefully their nose is sharp enough to detect the strongest food smell that poses the least amount of risk.

    I don't see the bear canister as being a guarantee of no bear encounters. The biggest advantage I see is that if you are three days from anywhere thats going to become three days from anywhere without food if a bear does get it. Trees can't always be depended on to be where you need them either so it saves that hassle. I don't want to say anything that would cause anyone to let their guard down but I feel that the biggest problem would be in campgrounds where bears have become familiar with the presence of people and see them as a source of food. I have heard in the boundary waters bears have visually gone after backpacks with people in them because they have learned that is where the food is. I do sleep with at least a flashlight, bear spray and air horn, and if I am solo, a 357. I also don't travel far from my tent to urinate. Only once have I heard a bear. He took one sniff/snort next to my tent, which woke me up, and left. If I could smell me after a few days on the trail I would probably do the same. Based on my experience to date I would say being trampled by a herd of elk would be the biggest threat.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elk Hunter View Post
    Good question. It would seem to defeat the purpose of using a bear canister if your carrying your snacks in your side pocket all day. Trash, toothpaste, snacks and all go in the bear canister, but not my clothing or my backpack. Hopefully their nose is sharp enough to detect the strongest food smell that poses the least amount of risk.

    I don't see the bear canister as being a guarantee of no bear encounters. The biggest advantage I see is that if you are three days from anywhere thats going to become three days from anywhere without food if a bear does get it. Trees can't always be depended on to be where you need them either so it saves that hassle. I don't want to say anything that would cause anyone to let their guard down but I feel that the biggest problem would be in campgrounds where bears have become familiar with the presence of people and see them as a source of food. I have heard in the boundary waters bears have visually gone after backpacks with people in them because they have learned that is where the food is. I do sleep with at least a flashlight, bear spray and air horn, and if I am solo, a 357. I also don't travel far from my tent to urinate. Only once have I heard a bear. He took one sniff/snort next to my tent, which woke me up, and left. If I could smell me after a few days on the trail I would probably do the same. Based on my experience to date I would say being trampled by a herd of elk would be the biggest threat.

    That's why I'm going to do the OpSacks and the bear bag - the sacks are supposed to prevent any odors from getting out, but just in case, hopefully hanging the bag will keep the bear away from my food, but more importantly, it will keep the bear from coming to into my tent looking for food.

    I'm wondering about the snacks as far where to put them. I don't want to have to drop my pack every time I want a snack, but I don't want to have to hang my coat every night, either.

    I have some pouches that go on the waist belt of my ruck, so the more I think about it, the more I'm leaning towards keeping my snacks for the day in those, bringing a small block and tackle and just hanging my ruck.
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

 

 

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