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  1. #11
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    +++ on the katydon pack pumps. I have been looking at adding a stery pen but not that concerned as the pump works dang well.
    I hunt because......

  2. #12
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    Water treatment methods:

    1) No treatment. Studies have shown in most backcountry areas of the Western US this is pretty safe, and people are far more likely to bring a pathogen into the backcountry than get infected with a pathogen from the backcountry. I don't like this method for peace-of-mind reasons.

    2) Classic pump filter. I have had several Katadyns. They don't work on viruses, and there is some debate whether they do much on other pathogens. They are heavier, and will break with use. They are better for filtering larger amounts of water than some other methods, but pumping sucks.

    3) "Flow" filters (Sawyer, etc.). I have these too, and like that they are at least as effective as a traditional filter and easier to use. I really like the inline filters because you can just dip your bladder and drink as you go. Downsides are similar to regular filters, but the biggest drawback is they WILL freeze in the cold and break, so cold weather use is limited.

    4) Drops/tablets. They are ultralight and convenient. I don't like the wait times or the taste of some methods.

    5) UV Treatment. I have a steripen and this is my favorite method for areas with a lot of water, because I can save weight by only taking a quart at a time, and filling as I go. It is quick and easy. It deactivates everything, including viruses. You do need pretty clear water and you depend on batteries. Works in the cold.

    6) Boiling. By far the safest method. It is slow, and you end up with really hot water. It takes fuel to do it.

    My .02

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  4. #13
    Senior Member
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    Sawyer filter with tabs for backup. Lightweight and effective. When I hunt in freezing temps I wrap the sawyer filter with a clothing item and stuff in pack. Haven't had one crack yet but I don't hunt in the extreme frigid temps of the far north either

  5. #14
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    I use the Katadyn Hiker Pro and the Katadyn water bottle. They will get rid of the bacteria, viruses, cysts and will improve the taste of the water. Pens treat the stuff but it stays in the water, they don't remove dirt, and the water needs to be clear for them to work. If you want to use tablets I'd go with the Katadyn Micropur tablets they are the only EPA registered tablets that kill all microorganisms to the EPA standard including Cryptosporidium.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bitterroot Bulls View Post
    Water treatment methods:

    1) No treatment. Studies have shown in most backcountry areas of the Western US this is pretty safe, and people are far more likely to bring a pathogen into the backcountry than get infected with a pathogen from the backcountry. I don't like this method for peace-of-mind reasons.

    2) Classic pump filter. I have had several Katadyns. They don't work on viruses, and there is some debate whether they do much on other pathogens. They are heavier, and will break with use. They are better for filtering larger amounts of water than some other methods, but pumping sucks.

    3) "Flow" filters (Sawyer, etc.). I have these too, and like that they are at least as effective as a traditional filter and easier to use. I really like the inline filters because you can just dip your bladder and drink as you go. Downsides are similar to regular filters, but the biggest drawback is they WILL freeze in the cold and break, so cold weather use is limited.

    4) Drops/tablets. They are ultralight and convenient. I don't like the wait times or the taste of some methods.

    5) UV Treatment. I have a steripen and this is my favorite method for areas with a lot of water, because I can save weight by only taking a quart at a time, and filling as I go. It is quick and easy. It deactivates everything, including viruses. You do need pretty clear water and you depend on batteries. Works in the cold.

    6) Boiling. By far the safest method. It is slow, and you end up with really hot water. It takes fuel to do it.

    My .02
    Sawyer actually recommends sleeping with it in your bag to keep it from freezing... I'm going the same route as slim jim and wrapping it good and keeping it in the tent with me.
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

  7. #16
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    I have been using the MSR hyperflow for 5 years and it is a great way to treat water in the back country. I recomend this pump to people but it is the only one I have used.
    A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    Shoot the best, Shoot PSE!

  8. #17
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    I have a MSR pump which is great. I used the iodine tablets one year to save weight but didnt like wait half hour to drink.

  9. #18
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    Steripen is a great lightweight and rapid working product, but I have experienced problems with it in the cold. I learned the hard way that you should take the batteries out and stick them in your pocket between uses, or keep the whole unit in a insulated pocket. The steripen is awesome when you know you will be encountering clear water sources, like mountain streams or lake water. For turbid water sources, like ones encountered in a lot of desert environments, the pump style or filtered products are really nice, and worth the extra weight- unless you are cool with slimy/gritty brown water in your mouth (yuck). I will also always have some chlorine dioxide tablets just in case- these are so lightweight and packable it is almost a no-brainer. Of all the topics on this great forum, I think that back country hydration is one of, if not THE most important aspect of a hunters preparation for a back country outing. Best of luck on your upcoming back country hunts.

  10. #19
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    Will be using my Geigerrig with inline filter on all archery elk season in Colorado.

    Works really well.

    Rudy

  11. #20
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    We used iodine tabs in the service, and today the smell of iodine will make me puke!. I'm hunting the high country, so this season I'll haul a steripen along with some Aquamira tablets, but I'll also take along some pieces of cheesecloth to put over the mouth of the container to act as a "large object" screen.

 

 

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