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  1. #1
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    257 Weatherby vs 25-06

    I have decided to buy another rifle this summer for myself and my son. Main purpose will be antelope/deer. I was set on a 25-06 but a friend is riding me hard to go with the .257 Weatherby. Anyone have any opinions on this rifle? Ballistics look pretty dang good but I didn't know if there were any negatives to consider with this cartridge. Thanks for any/all feedback.

  2. #2
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    Either is a fine choice. Essentially you get about another 100yards of range from the 257, with more flash bang. Ammo costs are lower and generally more available for the 25-06. You'd probably want a min. 24" tube, 26" probably better on the 257, where the 25-06 works well in a 22", with 24" probably better. Recoil is moderate with either, more a function of stock design and rifle weight, but if all is equal, 257 will give a bit more. I shoot a 25-06 often for deer and antelope and do not hesitate to use it on cow elk. It has taken game cleanly to over 400 yards, with the capability to go further. For me, I'd pick the 25-06 as I would not shoot one further than the other. When I want ultra long range, over 400, I step up to a 6.5mm to 7mm with at least 140-168 grains to keep energy
    up. But if you want to reach way out there with a 25 caliber, the 257 will give you more reach and become the better choice, IMO, for that sort of work. No wrong choice.

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  4. #3
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    I own both of them. If I was going to buy and shoot just one, it would be the 26-06. The ballistics aren't that much different, between 150 and 200 fps with the same bullet and it takes a lot more powder to do it in the .257 Wby. I have spent a lot of time working on loads for the Wby and have tried many different powder/bullet combinations. The barrel fouls a lot sooner than the 25-06 and it just doesn't shoot as tight groups as the 25-06. Not a lot of difference, the 25-06 always has shot less than moa and the best I've been able to get out of the Wby is 1.5 to 1.75.

    Rifles are both factory except for glass bedding on both stocks. The 25-06 is the old model M77 Ruger (tang safety) with a 4 x 14 Leupold VXlll. The Weatherby is a MKV with a 3x9 Leupold VXlll. I bought the Ruger new in 1974 and a friend gave me the Wby 3 years ago. It was his Dad's and really needed a lot of work. The barrel took several weeks of scrubbing to get it clean and I glass bedded the stock.

    Both are great guns and you can't go wrong with either caliber. I've loaned my Wby to my best friend, don't know if I'll ever get it back. LOL He keeps trying to buy it, but I tell him "Just go shoot it. You rental fee is backstraps off everything you shoot!"

    I did neglect to say that all I've ever shot in the Wby is reloads. I got 500 pieces of Wby brass with the gun. If I had to buy ammo, then there would be no choice as the Wby stuff is really expensive.
    Last edited by Colorado Cowboy; 02-13-2015 at 01:15 PM.
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  6. #4
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    For non handloaders the price of Weatherby ammo is crazy. That's the only drawback. Both are excellent calibers.

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  8. #5
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    Both cartridges are perfectly capable for your purpose, the decision to me would be in the cost of ammo/brass/powder vs. minimal gained performance. The 25-06 is simply cheaper to shoot and an antelope/deer would act the same if hit by either one.

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  10. #6
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    I've owned both in custom builds. The one I kept is the 25-06. To really reap the benefits of the Weatherby it should have a 26" barrel. I don't like a barrel that long as those extra 2" just seem to make it too long to handle nicely. That and I owned horses and the 26" did not ride right for scabbard use. Given that along with the cost of factory cartridges(or brass) and the extra powder needed to gain a bit more speed, I just did not think it was worth it in the end. Put both cartridges in barrels of equal length and the straight 25-06 isn't too far behind. Mine has a 23" barrel and I can hit 3150fps(110 Accubond) easily with a 23" barrel. I like Tim M will go to a different caliber bigger if I feel the need to hunt something bigger or further than what the .25 will do.

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  12. #7
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    I own both and as the ballistics indicate the 257 wby is superior. That being said I would not be able to afford the ammo if I did not hand load. Ammo is more readily available and affordable for the 25-06 and there are allot more choice in factory ammo for the 25-06 than the 257. But the good news is you will not be disappointed with the performance of either one if you use quality ammo. I would not recommend using cheap 100 grn bullets on deer with the 25-06, I have tracked lots of deer for my father in law that were hit decent but with crappy ammo that blew up on impact with the 25-06.

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  14. #8
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    I have shot the .257 and liked it, but never owned one, I do own a 25-06 . Browning A-Bolt and have killed Mule Deer, Antelope and Whitetail and love it.

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  16. #9
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    Thanks for the responses guys. My research shows about $10-$12 a box difference in the Hornady ammo I typically shoot. For me that is about $50- $100.00 a year as I may shoot 5-10 boxes throughout the year through each rifle. The cost difference to me isn't a deciding factor. Other mentions of barrel length may be. If I understand right the 25-06 "should have" a 24" barrel for optimal performance and the 257 should have a 26". I honestly have never owner a rifle with longer than a 22" barrel. I think I will have to go hold one to see and feel the difference. On paper the big advantage appears to be about 75 yards longer point blank range. The 257 appears to be flat enough to have a PBR of 400 yards where the 25-06 is about 325 PBR. Again thanks guys- time to go take them for a test drive.

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    For all the reasons stated I too would go with the 25-06. I have one in a Remington Mountain rifle with the .22 inch barrel and it is a great cartridge. I do wish it had the 24" barrel, but it works fine. My load with 120 gr. Partitions chronographs exactly at 3000 fps. That's a great bullet for anything I want to shoot with that rifle. I have used it to take a couple of elk with. I shot a spike bull at about 350 yards and I let a young hunter use it on his first big-game animal ever which was a nice fat cow elk. He drilled her one time at 250 yards and she went about 30 yards and dropped. The 25-06 is a great round and a good choice for what you plan with it.
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