Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    932
    Thanks
    53
    Thanked 499 Times in 193 Posts
    Congratulations
    1
    Congratulated 9 Times in 5 Posts

    After the Kill, Meat Care Tips-New Hunter's Resource

    So you have your first big game animal down, and breaking it down for a pack animal isn't an option. It will all be going out on your back. I want to hear how you prepare your meat for the packout, and what you do once you have it at the truck.

    The first thing that I always do is get the hide off, the hide is meant to keep the animal warm when it is alive. I am trying to do just the opposite. That meat needs to cool down and quick!

    Because I am a backpack hunter, I always bone out the meat. My methods may not be pretty, but they get the meat off of the bone. Meat actually turns green from the inside out, opening up the quarters to get every usable piece of meat off the bone helps tremendously to keep it cool.

    What do you guys do?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    814
    Thanks
    188
    Thanked 220 Times in 131 Posts
    Congratulations
    5
    Congratulated 17 Times in 3 Posts
    I do pretty much the same. First tag the animal then since most of my hunts are solo now I bone out my elk. I try to plan ahead and most of the areas I hunt have quite a few drainage's with cold water streams. I first place the meat in game bags and hang the meat. If it is warm out like most of bow season I carry some large plastic bags with me. After I am finished with the meat and it has been hung I then pack up my first load to take back to the truck. If it is warm I put the meat that is left in the game bags for the next trip in the large plastic bags and submerge them in a close by stream to keep it cool. I do the same at the truck if it is warm I place the meat in a close by stream to keep it cool if I don't have Ice. Then just Head back in to get the rest of the meat.The last trip will be with the horns,cape and camp if I can handle it. If not the camp comes out last.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to 25contender For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Edmonton AB.
    Posts
    164
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 6 Times in 4 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Depending on how long I think the pack will take I have a couple different strategies. If it is only going to be a few hours I will skin, quarter, debone, and simply hang the meat I'm not packing first trip in a tree.

    If it is going to be a longer pack out (several hours to overnight) I will split the large muscles group up (the same I would for butchering at home) and let them cool and set up for as long as I can in the shade while I deal with the rest of the animal. I start with the hinds and by the time I am done the fronts and caping the head the hinds are well set. I then hang and pack as fast as I can.

    If it is going to be a couple days I will split the large muscles groups down and find a place to stash them to cool. If there is a snowbank nearby I will toss the meat in a plastic bag and bury it. If there is a creek nearby I will double bag the meat and sink it in the water. My longest pack has been two full days and the night in between. I stashed the meat in some snow and it was cool and fresh for the last trip out.

    Back a the vehicle a big cooler with some ice or dry ice is handy if you expect a long pack. I was able to take the loads I packed out to a cooler at a butchers between trips.
    People in SUV's and suburbs will kill more game animals than a man with a bow, ever could.

  5. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    144
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 27 Times in 18 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    How long would you guys be comfortable with boned out cloth bags of deer meat hanging in the shade, in weather where the days high is about 65-75* and the low is 50-45*? There is usually some sort of breeze blowing too, I know that seems to help keep it cool.

  6. #5
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    932
    Thanks
    53
    Thanked 499 Times in 193 Posts
    Congratulations
    1
    Congratulated 9 Times in 5 Posts
    In those types of conditions I want to get it back to the cooler ASAP! My preference is freezing temperatures at night, or a dry bag and a creek to get it cool when the temperatures are warm.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to ScottR For This Useful Post:


  8. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    "I've been to a town Del."
    Posts
    208
    Thanks
    16
    Thanked 50 Times in 30 Posts
    Congratulations
    3
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Once my animal is down I'm getting the hide off those quarters asap as well! I like to hang my meat in the shade, preferably with a breeze (air circulation is important) I'll take as much as I can carry the first trip. On an elk that is usually both fronts(boned), both straps, and the tenders. I'll get this in my cooler or home to the freezer (I butcher my own) as fast as I can. If I have the luxury of a helping hand then we obviously get more out at once. I then go back in and bone out the hinds and get each one of those out, usually one at at time but I've done both at once a couple times when the distance and terrain allowed it. The point is, get it skinned and hung up in the shade and breeze to cool. I've built a "grate" of limbs over a creek once to capture that cold air, it worked very well. Obviously, if the temps are cooler to cold you have more time but getting the hide off and getting it hung up in the shade and breeze is still tantamount to having the best table fare possible.

  9. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Wyoming
    Posts
    586
    Thanks
    115
    Thanked 163 Times in 129 Posts
    Congratulations
    32
    Congratulated 5 Times in 2 Posts
    While I agree that skinning the animal quickly is a good idea, it is not the first thing that I do when breaking down. I prefer to leave the hide on until after completed with the quartering process to give me a some way to lay the quarters out on the ground without contaminating with foreign debris. Next, I'll hang in a shady spot and skinning and de-boning occurs for the subsequent loads. I'll leave the meat on the bone while hanging (if temps aren't too warm), much easier to handle and hang that way, and bone out for each load as I go. This way you give your legs and back a break in between the hauls during the time you're preparing the next load.

  10. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    144
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 27 Times in 18 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    In CA it's warm here and I usually skin one side right away, take off the quarters then roll it over and do the other side. Once in the shade and in a breeze they cool down ok. Then unless it's going to be night soon, I hike out and get them on ice in the truck in 4-6 hours after the kill. There's usually no trees around big enough to hang a deer so that's not an option for me. So far the meat has always been delicious. Some guys here say it's fine to leave them in the shade for a day or two. They hang the meat bags at night and cover them with a sleeping bag during the day for insulation. I guess that's one nice thing about hunting solo, when I'm ready to go, I go! (I hunt the high sierra's and not the 100*+ A-zone like many people do. I tried that and it's miserable.)

  11. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    43
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
    Congratulations
    0
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    What NID said I have hunted A zone and if you kill a deer in the AM it's too hot to pack it out so I would wait till evening then go. I would quarter them just like NID said and hang it in a cotton pillow case. Good thing the deer are small!

  12. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    239
    Thanks
    58
    Thanked 34 Times in 31 Posts
    Congratulations
    4
    Congratulated 0 Times in 0 Posts
    This might be a stupid question but can I bring a quartered animal to a processor? I do not butcher my own game, I have no idea how to do so and I would hate to ruin good meat

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Meat care long term
    By OregonJim in forum Back at the Tailgate
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 03-27-2014, 01:17 PM
  2. Boot Care-New Hunter's Resource
    By ScottR in forum Other
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-19-2014, 05:15 PM
  3. Clothing Layers-New Hunter's Resource
    By ScottR in forum Other
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-18-2014, 01:14 PM
  4. Replies: 30
    Last Post: 02-16-2014, 03:34 PM
  5. Need Advice on Meat Care?
    By bz_711 in forum Elk
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 09-24-2012, 08:32 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •