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  1. #11
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    I must have received a bad pair, I really wanted mine to be what everyone talks about. Mine wore the back side of my heals raw, leak like a sieve and the tread was worn down 75% in the first season, is it possible I received a "lemon" pair of boots?

  2. #12
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    I bought a pair last year and was dealing with significant blisters on my heels as others have mentioned and was starting to get a bit frustrated, but I didn't really do much in the way of breaking them in before doing a lot of steep uphill hiking. I read that it takes about 50 miles to get a good "mid-foot flex." I spent some more time just wearing them around, mowing the lawn and whatnot. I also spent a few evening while watching TV just flexing my boots with my hands. Since, these boots have gone from blocky, uber stiff boots that I felt uncoordinated in, to absolutely awesome mountain boots with the just the right amount of stiffness. The heel blisters have disappeared and I am finally really satisfied with my purchase, but it took quite a bit of time and patience.
    Can't spell scum without U&M... Go 'Cats!

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  4. #13
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    Timberstalker, I don't think you bought a bad pair, I think that your foot needs a different boot. Everyones foot is different and you just haven't found the right boot for you. The bad part of this story is that it can get expensive trying boot after boot. Some people who have bad luck with Kenetrek have had good luck with the Mendle's, Lowa's and the Crispi. But I have never tried them. I have tried the Zamberlain and I had similar results as the Kenetreks but after a couple of months they stated hurting one of my feet which has problems. I don't think it was the boots fault but was the foot. Nevertheless, since the Zamberlain was similar to the Kenetreks for me then it probably will not be good for you. Good luck in your search for the right boot. fatrascal.

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  6. #14
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    I just bought me a pair of these boots and I really like them, but when I go uphill, I can feel my heel slip in and out of the heel pocket and I know this will absolutely kill my feet in the long run. I have 30 days to wear them and return them if they don't fit right, but how long do I give them to see if I can get rid of the heel slip? Its not like I can go out hiking a few miles a day to test them out then try to return them. Any suggestions?

    I'm assuming that its just because they are really stiff and don't flex with my foot quite right yet, but I don't really want to gamble $400 on a pair of boots I hope stop letting my heel slip.
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

  7. #15
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    I only know what I went through. I bought mine in June of '11, that September was my sheep hunt. I wore them all summer trying to break them in, hiking, walks, when ever I could. I thought they were ready by my hunt. Within the first few days of the hunt the backs of my heal were raw with blisters, I bandaged them up and kept at it. By the end of the first week the blisters healed and I have been good ever since. I must have had 200+ miles on mine before they quit giving my heals troubles. Then that next month I wore them elk hunting in wet conditions and my feet were wet within the first hour of the hunt. Not good....

  8. #16
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    I bought the uninsulated wide version as my feet are usually hot and are wide. They seemed crazy stiff at first but were comfortable, if that makes sense. Then had some heel hot spots and minor blisters when under load and actually pretty easy hiking. thought they were going to have that problem indefinetly, and that they just didn't fit me well. Continued wearing them and heel problem seemed to work out (maybe it was as the sole began to flex a bit more). This was their third season and finally wore through tips on a NM desert hunt that had lots of vertical and sharp rocks. Plan on filling the two hole with some Aqua seal and keep on using them. Also plan on buying some insulated ones for a winter/snow likely hunt, either Kennetreks or Lowa.

  9. #17
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    I'll continue to try and break mine in, but damn it's a painful process. 100 miles on them and they still tear my heels up when hiking up steep terrain. Sent them back so the boot-smith could work on them. Didn't make much difference. At $400 a pair I'm committed to continue trying, just won't do it during real hunts where I can't afford to get a blister. I don't believe the theory of the sole breaking in and flexing. I think it's the front that needs to break in, allowing your ankle to pivot forward without the leather torquing your heel back. I've done a lot of mountaineering and wear extremely stiff plastic boots all day long, often carrying a heavy pack and climbing thousands of vertical feet in a climb. There's almost no break in either. I wear them on snow, ice, rocks, trails and scree with no issues. Those soles don't break in because they don't flex. The upper flexes, actually pivots forward, but not the sole. I don't know why the hunting industry doesn't learn from the mountaineering industry.

    We'll see, hopefully next year I can write a post that my Kenetreks finally work great. Otherwise I have $400 door stops.

  10. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bughalli View Post
    I'll continue to try and break mine in, but damn it's a painful process. 100 miles on them and they still tear my heels up when hiking up steep terrain. Sent them back so the boot-smith could work on them. Didn't make much difference. At $400 a pair I'm committed to continue trying, just won't do it during real hunts where I can't afford to get a blister. I don't believe the theory of the sole breaking in and flexing. I think it's the front that needs to break in, allowing your ankle to pivot forward without the leather torquing your heel back. I've done a lot of mountaineering and wear extremely stiff plastic boots all day long, often carrying a heavy pack and climbing thousands of vertical feet in a climb. There's almost no break in either. I wear them on snow, ice, rocks, trails and scree with no issues. Those soles don't break in because they don't flex. The upper flexes, actually pivots forward, but not the sole. I don't know why the hunting industry doesn't learn from the mountaineering industry.

    We'll see, hopefully next year I can write a post that my Kenetreks finally work great. Otherwise I have $400 door stops.
    Yeah, I'm afraid of that happening to me. I think I'm going to return mine and try some different boots. Called Lathrop and Sons but no answer. Waiting on a call back to see which boots they recommend for heel slip.
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

  11. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdcour View Post
    Yeah, I'm afraid of that happening to me. I think I'm going to return mine and try some different boots. Called Lathrop and Sons but no answer. Waiting on a call back to see which boots they recommend for heel slip.
    I think you are making a good call. I believe Fatrascal is right, not every one has the same foot. Good luck

  12. #20
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    I thought about a pair,but seemed like alot of issues with heal slip.I tried the crispi's and have had no problems with a hard full season of hunting in Idaho"s mnts and rocks.Hope this helps,Larry

 

 

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