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  1. #1
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    elk smell what????

    wed morn i was 3/4 up this mt where i sat under a lone pine tree on a south facing slope escaping the frigid cold and snow and rain. once i could see i spotted the elk i knew were close by, i started calling, in turn starting off a symphany of music from the elk....... 20 min later i hear a pound directly behind me, i turn my head to see a 5x5 bull staring me directly into my eyes. wind was directly in my face, he woulda shoulda had to have smelled me!!! he didnt care. he stood his ground, only flenching slightly when he seen me move slowly fo rmy bow. we sat there for 3 min before he was satisfied i wasnt an elk and he walked off, didnt run, walked off not giving me a shot at all. why didnt he smell me? why didnt he care? was i his first human contact? i was baffled, i sat up how i did so nothing would come in from behind me.

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    Here is my theory. I know that when bird hunting a dog can smell birds on cold/wet grass much better, to the extent that they will be convinced a bird is there when they likely flew hours earlier. This leads me to believe that the particles in the air that the animal smells will blow around more when it is dry and won't when it is wet. By this logic you could assume that when it is wet out there is less scent blowing, because the majority of it is adhered to a wet surface and isn't evaporating, making it more difficult for an animal to detect you because less of your scent particals are flying.

    How's that for some science/BS?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnhunter View Post
    Here is my theory. I know that when bird hunting a dog can smell birds on cold/wet grass much better, to the extent that they will be convinced a bird is there when they likely flew hours earlier. This leads me to believe that the particles in the air that the animal smells will blow around more when it is dry and won't when it is wet. By this logic you could assume that when it is wet out there is less scent blowing, because the majority of it is adhered to a wet surface and isn't evaporating, making it more difficult for an animal to detect you because less of your scent particals are flying.

    How's that for some science/BS?
    I think that's backwards? You're right on the dog smelling, but I think it would be the same with big game, in that they too would be able to scent you better?
    My grandpa was a bigtime bird hunter, and when my dad was younger, my grandpa would always tell him on the wetter days: "today's going to be a good day, Queenie will really be able to catch scent today" And he would always be right..
    It's been our observation that our deer tend to move and rut much better on days where it is wetter, and often times we will see hardly any movement, even during normal high rut activity times, during periods of longer term dry weather.

    I would think that bull would have had a pretty easy time scenting you, as your scent would have been just hanging around the area.. My guess is that he just didn't care?
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

  4. #4
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    im thinking he both didnt care and was to worked up for a cow to care. ive been on alot of elk before but never like that without him blowing out

  5. #5
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    Ivory, i have had a bull do that from 30 yards before and never give me a shot. Sometimes we are so still, smell isn't enough to spook them. When your still, camo does wonders to keep them somewhat calm.

    He wasn't happy with what you were, but wasn't spooked enough to run for it. Your movements were more than likely very small. Plus what ever scent control you used may have helped. My bull this year i took from 35ish yards. He came in on my back trail and never spooked. Must be something in these Idaho winds lol.
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  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    If it was raining while he came up behind you I think it could kinda hold your sent down or wash it away or something like that and make it harder for him to smell you.

  8. #8
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    Wasn't raining in the video.

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    I think people way under estimate most animals noses. My uncles bird dog has pointed pheasants while she was retrieving a pheasant. I have watched my lab while she was running downwind of a dead duck hit there scent from 10 to 15 yards away from the duck and she acts like she hit a wall, and that duck has only been laying there maybe 15 seconds.

  10. #10
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    I'm not sure hunters underestimate it. Otherwise the scent industry would go broke.

 

 

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