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  1. #21
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    I got a Wild Country (part of a company called Terra Nova) Duolite, I got it on sale for $170 off of Amazon.

    It's on the heavy side, about 6lbs, but it's free-standing, the inner and fly are connected together, the frame is outside the fly and the inner lining is the heavier, white material, not bug netting.

    I specifically looked for those features because I wanted something that would:

    a) be quick and easy to put up in a cold, gusty rain, you just lay out the tent, put the frame up over it and clip the fly to the frame;
    b) something that didn't require stakes to stay up if I was in area that didn't hold stakes well and;
    c) the heavier material is warmer in the mountains in the late fall/winter.

    It's also got a vestibule in front, my ruck is a tight fit, but it will fit.

    Definitely get at least a two person, Wild Country has a single person version of the same tent, but they must have used Japanese midgets to size it. Me and my sleeping pad take up most of the space in my two-person tent, so the single person would be more like a bivy tent.
    Ah, the nostalgic aroma of a yak dung stove brewing up some tea full of herbs best left untranslated.
    From the Zen Backpacking Site

  2. #22
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    My backpacking tents are an MSR Hoop 2P and Easton Rimrock 1P. The MSR is great for two people and was made specifically for two WIDE air matresses. With that in mind, it doesn't feel like you're being forced to spoon with your companion all night long. It has two spacious side entry/vestibules and has been a great tent overall. I love dual side entry tents! No more crawling over your partner to get in/out. I think total weight is in the mid-to-high 6 or low 7 pounds. Not the lightest 2P by far, but if you have a partner, it splits up to around 3-3.5 lbs each. You can also use the fly and ground tarp stand alone, and completely get rid of the tent if you like. That will save you a little more than a pound. It's also rated as a 3+ season tent, and there are additional side pole stiffeners that can be used to make the tent even stouter if nasty weather is expected.

    I just got the Rimrock last year, and only used it once in good weather. The vestibule is skimpy (~8-9 SF), but I got it knowing that if I'm trying to save weight, I can't be packing the Taj Mahal around with me in the hills. Total weight is 3.2 lbs if I remember right. It's also a side entry. Overall, its design and construction look good, and the price is hard to beat at $170. A lot of the other higher quality tents out there are going for $300-400! Its lower price tag was the only way I could justify picking up a 1P to my wife. I'm a firm believer that you pay for quality, but this one may be a gem based on my experience with tents in general.
    Last edited by MWScott72; 01-16-2014 at 01:40 PM.

  3. #23
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    For traditional tents, I have done well with MSR. (Hubba and Hubba Hubba)

    I have used Kifaru tipis and love them for using with a stove.

    I have a Tarptent Contrail for solo trips in buggy conditions.

    This year I mostly ran my GoLite SL5 both with the nest and floorless with perimeter netting (installed by BearPaw Wilderness designs). I think this is the best option of the ones I listed for the OP's uses when all things are considered including space, weight, flexibility, and cost.

  4. #24
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    I use the Big Agnes Fly Creek 2 as well. It holds up to extreme wind as well as rain. I use it above timberline here in Colorado and have slept through some helacious storms in it, last year being the worst by far. I stayed dry and it held up well. Great tent but it will cost you!
    A bad day in the woods is better than a good day at work.
    Shoot the best, Shoot PSE!

  5. #25
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    I picked up a Big Agnes Fly Creek 2 on sale to try out this coming season. The one I have says two person tent but I think it would be a tight fit for 2 people. I wanted something with a vestibule to have access to my backpack without carrying one extra and a bit more head room. I’ve had a 4 season Outdoor Research Alpine Bivy solo tent for the last few seasons. It works ok, it is lightweight and I can get some more space with a lightweight tarp to have access to my pack in the rain and all but just wanted a bit more head room in the tent.

    I picked up a GoLite SL5 last year more so for the family and taking more folks with me but still have not tested it out yet. It will be a roomy place from the footprint and has some nice options for fitting a few folks on a trip. From what I've tried I typically go up one more than what they say. Most two person tents are pretty tight fitting for two folks.

  6. #26
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    I have spent 4 seasons now above 12,000 ft. On 6 separate back country hunts in a Hilleberg AKTO - Tent is a true 4 season tent and the inner + rainfly pitches all at once. Yes it is pricey but you get what you pay for. This tent is a real back country winner when the weather hits. ONLY cons I have are that if you do not picth it into the wind, you will get some condensation in the tent by morning due to your body heat radiating off of the rainfly - I have no other complaints.

    Remember that it is a one man tent, not the Westin - Space is tight but practical. I have lived a total of a month in mine so far on these trips and love it - A couple friends of mine have had inferior tents in the back country with me in the past and the tub has leaked on them, getting their sleeping bag wet. They were using a footprint too, so no holes, just bad stitching/materials/seam tape - Look deeper than just vestibule size or loft -

    The quality is always in the details -
    "This is A Way of Life"

  7. #27
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    No matter the brand, if you intend to have two people in the tent, you will want a 3 man model. Unless you are both under 100 pounds, or she is particularly cute, you will enjoy (and need) the extra room of the 3 man model.
    I use the BA Fly Creek UL2 for one person, and UL3 for two people. This allows room for a small amount of gear and dry clothes inside, without leaning against the walls of the tent all night long.
    I looked at the side opening models, Copper spur, etc., but they let in too much rain in bad weather (Alaska). Sure, it is easier to get in and out, but I want my tent ( and sleeping bag) to stay dry. With the weight of a UL 2 at around 2 1/4 pounds, there just isn't any way to save noticeable weight with a floorless style. And although I don't particularly like the crawly bugs, they don't bother me near as much as the flying ones - mosquitos. I want a tent I can seal from the bugs and enjoy a peaceful nights sleep.
    llp

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by llp View Post
    No matter the brand, if you intend to have two people in the tent, you will want a 3 man model. Unless you are both under 100 pounds, or she is particularly cute, you will enjoy (and need) the extra room of the 3 man model.
    I use the BA Fly Creek UL2 for one person, and UL3 for two people. This allows room for a small amount of gear and dry clothes inside, without leaning against the walls of the tent all night long.
    I looked at the side opening models, Copper spur, etc., but they let in too much rain in bad weather (Alaska). Sure, it is easier to get in and out, but I want my tent ( and sleeping bag) to stay dry. With the weight of a UL 2 at around 2 1/4 pounds, there just isn't any way to save noticeable weight with a floorless style. And although I don't particularly like the crawly bugs, they don't bother me near as much as the flying ones - mosquitos. I want a tent I can seal from the bugs and enjoy a peaceful nights sleep.
    llp
    Curious what the entry has to do with letting rain in? I have the copper spur and I haven't had any issues using the rain fly and I have had it in some flatout downpours.

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk

  9. #29
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    Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2. Started with the Fly Creek UL1 and it was not big enough to sleep in and store anything that you didn't want to get wet (backpack, etc.) Sold the UL1 and got the UL2. Love it for its weight and I have slept two in it and it was cozy, but worked. Great tent in my opinion. Tried the MSR Hubba Hubba and sold it a few days later. It was not a freestanding tent, so trying to set it up in the rocks was tough. UL1 & UL2 are both freestanding and easy to setup and take down.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by twp1224 View Post
    Tried the MSR Hubba Hubba and sold it a few days later. It was not a freestanding tent, so trying to set it up in the rocks was tough.
    Are you sure it was a Hubba Hubba? I spent a lot of nights in a Hubba Hubba, and mine was freestanding.

 

 

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