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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKC View Post
    Here is what I don't like about high fenced hunts. Yes, there might be a ton of land that is inside the fence and it may have great elk habitat and the elk don't know any difference but the elk are there and they are not leaving! If you know they are there then it becomes a cat and mouse game. Other non high fenced elk hunts don't guarantee you any thing because the elk could move off at any time.
    Have you ever looked at the sci magazine and the advertisers? High fenced hunts will never be in my resume. I would think it would be pretty hard to sleep at night.
    When you look at their magazine and see all those freeky whitetails that are farm raised, you really get an idea what SCI is all about.
    Colorado Cowboy
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  2. #42
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    I was an SCI member for 1 year and never will be again because of all the high fence hunts in their magazine. No fences for me either!

  3. #43
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    "Have you ever looked at the sci magazine and the advertisers? High fenced hunts will never be in my resume. I would think it would be pretty hard to sleep at night."

    ***SCI "book" is a farce and that's all I'm going to say!

  4. #44
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    Here is something to ponder. Do you feel there is a difference between high fence and paying mega bucks to have an outfitter have his guides basically live and sleep with a great bull until the hunter arrives. I think they are basically the same situation. No thanks, I'm happy packing out a any elk on my own back. Trophy bull, cows, raghorns they all taste like elk and that to me is what matters.

  5. #45
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    To me there is always a difference if there is a fence or no fence but I agree with you on the guys paying big bucks and basically all they do is shoot the animal. Its not for me, even if I had that kinda money to burn! If I can find a mature animal and make a good stalk and take him without him knowing Im there Im happy even if he's not real big thats what gets me excited hunting! Going behind a fence or paying big money for someone else to do everything but shoot it would not be exciting to me at all no matter how big the animal was so I see no point in me doing it.

  6. #46
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    I assume you're talking about guys that buy these Governors tags at auction that lets them hunt almost an entire year and they generally hire Mossback (Doyle Moss) as their outfitter. He, in turn, hires a bunch of guys to go out for a finders fee to locate a big buck or bull and then basicly stay on it until the high roller comes and shoots it. It qualifies for B&C because it's considered fair chase with no high fences, but that's about as much of a hunt as shooting one in a pen as far as I'm concerned. That's the way the famous Spider Bull was taken in Utah by Denny Austad a few years ago.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topgun 30-06 View Post
    I assume you're talking about guys that buy these Governors tags at auction that lets them hunt almost an entire year and they generally hire Mossback (Doyle Moss) as their outfitter. He, in turn, hires a bunch of guys to go out for a finders fee to locate a big buck or bull and then basicly stay on it until the high roller comes and shoots it. It qualifies for B&C because it's considered fair chase with no high fences, but that's about as much of a hunt as shooting one in a pen as far as I'm concerned. That's the way the famous Spider Bull was taken in Utah by Denny Austad a few years ago.
    That's exactly what I'm talking about.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topgun 30-06 View Post
    I assume you're talking about guys that buy these Governors tags at auction that lets them hunt almost an entire year and they generally hire Mossback (Doyle Moss) as their outfitter. He, in turn, hires a bunch of guys to go out for a finders fee to locate a big buck or bull and then basicly stay on it until the high roller comes and shoots it. It qualifies for B&C because it's considered fair chase with no high fences, but that's about as much of a hunt as shooting one in a pen as far as I'm concerned. That's the way the famous Spider Bull was taken in Utah by Denny Austad a few years ago.
    +1 This was my only point. I agree.

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by ssliger View Post
    Here is something to ponder. Do you feel there is a difference between high fence and paying mega bucks to have an outfitter have his guides basically live and sleep with a great bull until the hunter arrives. I think they are basically the same situation. No thanks, I'm happy packing out a any elk on my own back. Trophy bull, cows, raghorns they all taste like elk and that to me is what matters.
    I've been on a few guided hunts and have never seen this situation. Generally the guide knows where the animals are (or where they are supposed to be) and you go looking.
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  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by 30Hart View Post
    Here lies a dilema that a lot of guys face that don't live close enough to the elk to effectively do their own scouting and prepare properly for a DIY hunt. They really want a big bull, but don't realize how difficult it can be to get a really big one say 340 or better. I'll use my uncle for an example...he's always wanted a 350 bull. I've pointed him in the right direction with the "short-list" of operations in various states like Wagonhound listed above. Obviously, he's found them too pricey even though he could afford them if he wanted to. Instead he's been on over 10 elk hunts ranging from $1,500-$4,000 and his biggest bull is a 260. He's spent over $25,000 spread over 30 years hunting elk. I told him to just save up for one premium hunt on a premium top-tier ranch. He's been "over-sold" on all his elk hunts trying to do it on the cheap. That's the problem picking up hunts at a "show"...unless you have first hand knowledge from guys that have hunted there you can fall pray to being oversold on a hunt.

    The DIYer is in the same tough boat as a lot of guys are putting faith in saving up points for that special elk hunt. The price can't be beat, but most guys don't realize the risks of putting all your eggs in one basket. A bad drought year, weather, forest fires...not being able to get off work for long enough to properly scout the area before the hunt, or family emergencies can ruin a hunt. Most guys w/ premium tags don't go home with monsters...some even go home with raghorns.

    That's a lot for a guy to consider, but if a guy is running out of time to hunt and defintely wants a big elk before they die I always advise them to just pay the money for a premium first-class operation on a ranch that has enough acreage to eliminate any issues.
    I'll take ten elk hunts over one "high priced hunt" any day.

 

 

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