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  1. #1
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    If you could have been told just one thing.....

    If you would have been told just one thing before your first Western States hunt, what would it have been? If you could recommend one resource for a new Western hunter what would it be?

    I am lucky enough to have grown up in Wyoming, and things like elevation, never wear cotton, and other typical things are second nature. If you could share one thing with a new guy hunting in conditions similar to yours, what would it be?

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    This could be a great thread. Hopefully lots of guys reply.

    I don't have a ton of experience so maybe this is also common knowledge but my tip would be to have an extra pair of boot laces in your pack.....

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  4. #3
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    I would say to use the best optics you can afford would be number one for me.

    Second would be learn to shoot farther then 50 yards.

    Third would be to know how to glass

    The only place at that time that I knew about on a great place for a resource would be my family that hunted. I would hunt with my Uncle and he taught me as we went.

    As for now IMO although slightly bias is this Forum and the Eastmans magazines.
    I don't Break the rules, I Modify them.

  5. #4
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    The "Don't wear cotton!" subject is for sure one to note. A few years ago my old hunitng partner shot a bull in a deep canyon, the next day we went to recover it wearing nothing but levis and cotton sweatshirts. About an hour down the cayon it started to rain, by 10:00 a.m. we were soaked to the bone. We weren't cold yet but we had 2000 ft to climb back out ahead of us, by 2:00 p.m. we climbed enough evevation that we hit the snowline and by now ere extremely cold. We made it out at about 4:30 p.m. and were suffering from the early stages of hypothermia. It was supposed to be a quick 5-6 hour recovery, but it didn't go as planned, it took us over 10 hours. Here's the canyon we were in.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2010 Elk hunt 007.jpg   2010 Elk hunt 008.jpg  

  6. #5
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    Everything comes so fast and unexpected your first few times. DO NOT expect to kill anything your first time, maybe not your first few times.

  7. #6
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    Be there before first light, and stay until dark.

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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ikeepitcold View Post
    Second would be learn to shoot farther then 50 yards.
    This is pretty big on my advice list..........not sure how many folks I have come across in the NV mountains blazing shots, sounding like WWIII. Some occasions I get to talk to them once the dust has cleared and it seems all of them have never shot past 100 yards and they were not sure how the gun was sighted in. They were used to close encounters, mostly guys from California.

    So I would say practice, practice, practice with whatever weapon you choose to hunt with and know what that particular weapon is capable of.

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  11. #8
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    1. Be prepared for ANY weather conditions on any hunt. You never know when you could get a foot of snow in September.

    2. Get a good map of the area (blm,fs,ect) and a gps with a huntinggpsmaps chip so you know where you can and cant hunt.

    I learned both those things the hard way and a few fairly miserable hunts I have been on would have been completely different had I known them. To me nothing is worse then being cold wet miserable and not knowing where you can and cant hunt.

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    Make sure you have good boots and thet they are broke in prior to the hunt.

    Don't expect to see anything from a vehicle.

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  15. #10
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    So many 'just one things'....

    On your first hunt out west- Make it an antelope hunt, easier, and more fun... And you'll probably actually fill a tag.

    While on your first antelope hunt- Either before or after, put about 50 pounds in your pack, and go climb a big mountain. You'll figure out what kind of shape you actually need to be in.

    On your first backpack hunt- Unpack about half the stuff that's currently in your pack, you don't need 300 feet of rope, or 4 knives, or 7 days worth of food for a 5 day hunt.

    Most importantly: GET IN SHAPE! You will hate the hunt if you can't physically do it. And make sure your partner is in shape as well, especially if you are planning on hunting together the entire time.
    My mind is a raging torrent, flooded with rivulets of thought cascading into a waterfall of creative alternatives.

 

 

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