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  1. #1
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    Breaking Down A Bull Elk-New Hunter's Resource

    Here is a video series that Guy put together in 2012.

    Part 1

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    Part 2

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    Part 3

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    Part 4

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    To get conversation going on this thread, what is your preferred method to break down an elk?

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    I saw this when Guy first did the series. It's a great way to break down a bull.
    I don't Break the rules, I Modify them.

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    Gutless method all the way and boning the meat off the bone. There is no reason on this earth why I would want to carry out the bones...especially if you are miles into the backcountry. Another fringe benefit of the gutless method is that you can stay much cleaner (typically) than if you are actually gutting the animal first. You can also grab the tenderloins by coming in from the backside. Now, if you like organ meat (heart, liver, kidneys, etc.) the gutless method is obviously not for you.

    One final benefit of going gutless method, IMO, is odor control. Case in point - I had to shoot a calf on an antlerless hunt twice this year. Turned out the first shot would have done the trick, but the animal was still standing, and if an elk is still standing, I'm still shooting. First shot was broadside behind the shoulder. Second shot was chest on, and due to the slope angle, the bullet exited out the bottom of the paunch. Completely blew up the stomach among other things. Opening that thing up would have been a HORRIBLE assault on the senses, but going gutless you couldn't tell the difference other than the pressure buildup in the animal as I was cleaning it.

  8. #8
    Eastmans' Staff / Moderator
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    Personally, I tend to bone out Elk. Like Guy stated, he learned this method from family outfitters. The advantage to leaving meat on the bone is that it is easier to maneuver. It also doesn't turn into a 100lb bowling ball at the bottom of your pack.

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    Skin, quarter, then backstraps and tenderloins, then lop the head off. I never cape and I leave the bone in for handling.

  10. #10
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    Gutless Method Rocks! I like to let the meat cool on the bone and then bone it out. Therefore, I usually take the straps, tenders, and both fronts out the first load leaving the hinds to cool on the bone and then bone them out the next day. Unless, I've got help then I'll take the same load as mentioned above and let my help take a hind. Once out I hang it to cool on the bone. Did four elk this way this past fall and it worked very well.

 

 

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