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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dearhunter3450 View Post
    This might be a stupid question but can I bring a quartered animal to a processor? I do not butcher my own game, I have no idea how to do so and I would hate to ruin good meat
    You bet you can! There are tons of youtube clips and such teaching how to quarter deer. I can't say I'm great at it, but once you do it a couple of times you will be pretty good at it. I know its actually cheaper where I'm at if you quarter it out, and even more cheaper if you bone it out. The less processing they actually have to do results in cheaper meat.
    Now therefore, please take your weapons, your quiver and your bow, and go out to the field and hunt game for me.
    Genesis 27:3 (NKJV)

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  3. #12
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    We have some videos planned for breaking down animals. I will see if we can get breaking down a buck on the list.

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  5. #13
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    Thank you guys. I just didn't want to walk into a processor with a sack of meat and have them throw me out lol! I will study up on proper quartering game. Thanks again

  6. #14
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    I was skeptical of this with the first cpl cuts, but he separates the major muscle groups which I think is the best way to go.


    http://youtu.be/xijmge8_NJw
    Last edited by WapitiBob; 03-01-2014 at 01:30 PM.

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  8. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 25contender View Post
    I do pretty much the same. First tag the animal then since most of my hunts are solo now I bone out my elk. I try to plan ahead and most of the areas I hunt have quite a few drainage's with cold water streams. I first place the meat in game bags and hang the meat. If it is warm out like most of bow season I carry some large plastic bags with me. After I am finished with the meat and it has been hung I then pack up my first load to take back to the truck. If it is warm I put the meat that is left in the game bags for the next trip in the large plastic bags and submerge them in a close by stream to keep it cool. I do the same at the truck if it is warm I place the meat in a close by stream to keep it cool if I don't have Ice. Then just Head back in to get the rest of the meat.The last trip will be with the horns,cape and camp if I can handle it. If not the camp comes out last.
    25contender,
    I've generally shied away from plastic bags at all, due to them not breathing and holding heat, but this sounds like an interesting option if need be! I can see how this could be useful especially on long pack-ins during early season if it's just not cooling down at night! Thanks

  9. #16
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    I process all my own game and if it's cool enough I like to quarter game rather than bone it out( where practical of course), just because it's so much easier to clean up and process if not all sides have been exposed in the field. Obviously if its too warm for cooling good,especially on elk size critters or if it's just too dang far to carry the bones out too, then I bone it out. I guess the weather and distance dictate my method in the field!

  10. #17
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    The plastic bags are only used to submerge the meat in Game bags in the cold water creeks between trips. When the meat is removed from the creeks the plastic bags come off.
    Quote Originally Posted by gonhunting247 View Post
    25contender,
    I've generally shied away from plastic bags at all, due to them not breathing and holding heat, but this sounds like an interesting option if need be! I can see how this could be useful especially on long pack-ins during early season if it's just not cooling down at night! Thanks

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  12. #18
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    This is all good stuff. One hard lesson I've learned over the years is that it isn't good enough to put them in just any game bag. The canvas and cotton game bags can be detrimental to your end product. I used to buy the el cheapo game bags from a Wal-Mart-type store for a couple of bucks and call it good. I liked the fact that I could throw them away when finished and they were cheap. However, they are made of cotton which does not dry quickly nor breathe well, and promote bacteria growth in short order. The canvas bags do the same and are much heavier. I didn't buy into the "quality game bag" argument for quite some time...until I used them. Complete game changer, in my opinion. They breathe unbelievably well, dry quickly, and are made of synthetic materials which don't rot. Tie this into the killer cooling tips in this thread from others and you have a good system to ensure proper table fare when you're 'back at the ranch'. I've also found that a gentleman named Larry Bartlett has some really good meat care tips in his videos on meat care. His website is: http://www.pristineventures.com/products.html. His T.A.G. Bags, and Caribou Gear's Big Game Bags, are the two best out there in my opinion.

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  14. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MulyBux7077 View Post
    This is all good stuff. One hard lesson I've learned over the years is that it isn't good enough to put them in just any game bag. The canvas and cotton game bags can be detrimental to your end product. I used to buy the el cheapo game bags from a Wal-Mart-type store for a couple of bucks and call it good. I liked the fact that I could throw them away when finished and they were cheap. However, they are made of cotton which does not dry quickly nor breathe well, and promote bacteria growth in short order. The canvas bags do the same and are much heavier. I didn't buy into the "quality game bag" argument for quite some time...until I used them. Complete game changer, in my opinion. They breathe unbelievably well, dry quickly, and are made of synthetic materials which don't rot. Tie this into the killer cooling tips in this thread from others and you have a good system to ensure proper table fare when you're 'back at the ranch'. I've also found that a gentleman named Larry Bartlett has some really good meat care tips in his videos on meat care. His website is: http://www.pristineventures.com/products.html. His T.A.G. Bags, and Caribou Gear's Big Game Bags, are the two best out there in my opinion.
    Best game bag bar none ! You guys might also think about packing a piece of Tyvek house wrap. You can take a 8'x8' piece of tyvek fold it down into a 12"x12"x1" and it weighs nothing. It gives you a place to lay your meat and work on it without getting it dirty. I then use it to reflect the sun away from the meat and give it shade.

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  16. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaska2go View Post
    Best game bag bar none ! You guys might also think about packing a piece of Tyvek house wrap. You can take a 8'x8' piece of tyvek fold it down into a 12"x12"x1" and it weighs nothing. It gives you a place to lay your meat and work on it without getting it dirty. I then use it to reflect the sun away from the meat and give it shade.

    Tyvek, why didn't I think of that? I have been using those cheap rescue blankets but I like this idea better. Thanks A2Go

 

 

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